PreparED Study Materials

CHEM 3321: Physical Chemistry I

School: University of Texas at Dallas

Number of Notes and Study Guides Available: 13

Notes

Videos

Finding NaOH Molarity: Titration of 0.200L SO?-Derived H?SO? Solution
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Determine the molarity of a NaOH solution through titration with sulfurous acid. Starting with the ideal gas equation we derive the concentration of a 0.200L SO?-derived H?SO? solution. Concluding with a molarity of 1.64 M for NaOH using calculated values.

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Differentiating Strong & Weak Electrolytes: Ionization in Aqueous Solu
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Discover the difference between strong and weak electrolytes by understanding their ionization in water. Using nitrous acid and nitric acid as examples, this video provides chemical equations that visually distinguish the ionization behavior of these electrolytes.

Cyclohexane to Adipic Acid: Nylon's Yield Calculations
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Explore the fascinating conversion of cyclohexane and oxygen into adipic acid, essential in nylon manufacture. This video breaks down the calculation of theoretical yield, actual yield, and the resultant percent yield of the process. From molar masses to intricate equations, get a concise understanding of this industrial reaction.

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Determining Moles of Released Ions in Dissolution Reactions
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When an ionic compound dissolves in water, it undergoes dissociation into its constituent ions. The total moles of ions released is determined by adding up the moles of each ion generated during this dissociation process. In the case of (a) disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na?HPO?), it dissociates into two sodium ions and one hydrogen phosphate ion. For (b) copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate (CuSO? · 5H?O), it dissociates into one copper ion and one sulfate ion. In (c), nickel(II) chloride (NiCl?) diss

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