×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UTEP - PSYC 2310 - Class Notes - Week 1
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UTEP - PSYC 2310 - Class Notes - Week 1

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UTEP / Psychology / PSYC 2310 / In what ways does reasoning vary between adults and children?

In what ways does reasoning vary between adults and children?

In what ways does reasoning vary between adults and children?

Description

School: University of Texas at El Paso
Department: Psychology
Course: Life Cycle Developmemt
Professor: Lawrence cohn
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: psyc 2310
Cost: 25
Name: Week 1
Description: Detailed lecture notes for 01-19 and 01-21
Uploaded: 01/29/2016
8 Pages 65 Views 2 Unlocks
Reviews


01­19­16


In what ways does reasoning vary between adults and children?



∙ Showed slide of 3 hands: man, woman, infant

∙ Reviewed syllabus

∙ Showed multiple slides of pictures

o What are changes from infancy to old age

∙ Show picture of a baby

∙ Originally assumed a blank slate 

∙ Shows old painting of young child in adult style clothing

o Assumed children mini adults

o Understand morality, makes good judgements, decision

∙ What ways does reasoning vary between adults and children

∙ Mickey Mouse math

∙ Research by Dr. Karen Wynn

o Found 5 month old like Michelle Follet reacted diff according to whether the # of  mickey mouse statuettes saw represented correct or correct addition


What happens if a human infant is raised by diff species?



o Kid sitting on rocker ask bizarre question can 5 month old add and subtract? o Think when you started to add/subtract

o Wynn thought lacking ability

o Wynn encountered how to test babies

o Takes baby and placed on rocker then places in front of stage with mickey  Only find surprising if expecting to see 2 mickeys, will look longer If you want to learn more check out How is personality organized?

 Found babies look long when there are not 2 mickeys upon reveal

 Violates expectation process

∙ Found babies understand environment

∙ Showed diagram of test procedure

∙ Non­human; primate, Gorilla Koko


What is the impact of television violence on children’s aggressive behavior?



∙ Baby gorilla rescued by Penny Paterson in Cali

o Wanted to address is human language uniquely human, can other species use  language

o Other species can communicate but can they use language

 Ex bees: but hardwired and language is complex

 Will teach Koko ASL

 Video tapes all exchanges with Koko

∙ Comments regularly on environment with humans based on 

randomly selected clips in month period

∙ Ex. Listen quiet when an alarm stops

∙ Ex mike cry for another gorilla is tearing

∙ Ex that’s soft referring to a hatIf you want to learn more check out What country is the world’s first industrial economy, that’s why it industrialized way before the rest of the world?

∙ Penny signs what can you think of that’s hard and Koko responds 

rock and work

∙ Go over interactions between penny and Koko about newsletter and alligators ∙ Are adolescence mini adults

o Death penalty when tried as adults?

o Is development continuous

o Early experiences shape subsequent results

∙ If I want new Mozart what is necessary

∙ Practical ?’s

∙ Spanking ok or not

∙ How do we acquire right and wrong

∙ Real Life Tarzan

∙ Wild Child

∙ What happens if human infant is raised by diff species?

∙ Watched YouTube video portrait of Vince birth to 13 in 3.5 minutes

∙ What changes cognitive, physical, so on

01­21­16 Research Method

Key Constructs

• Hypothesis: informal definition­an educated guess about something works • Formal: tentative statement about the relationship between two or more variables. • Good hypotheses must be testable We also discuss several other topics like What is the use of lewis dot structure?

• Ex the amount of aggression that children display is related to their level of inborn aggressiveness. Yes hypothesis but not testable.

• What is a variable: any stimulus that can vary in value

• Height

• Time

• Social class­as long as we can measure it

• Independent Variable: The experimental factor you manipulate, the treatment itself. • Dependent Variable: The behavior measured; the factor that might be affected by changes in the independent variable We also discuss several other topics like What was the reason for common sense?

• Operational Definitions: Specifies the operations and procedures that are used to define  the independent and dependent variables. (the details of what you did)

• Allows you to move from concrete to abstract.

• Very important to results

• Ex. Runaway defined as runaway with no preexisting safe place to go vs.  staying anywhere overnight w/o permission.

• Experimental group: the condition that exposes subjects to one version of independent  variable.

2

• Control group: a condition identical to the experimental one, except independent variable  has a different value, such as zero.

• Random selection: assigning subjects to conditions by chance, thus minimizing  preexisting differences between those in different conditions.

• Random assignment: same as random selection

• Experimental design

• Correlational design

• Cross­sectional design: always testing in relation to age, N consists of ppl at each age  group tested at same time, not same participants at each age. If you want to learn more check out What is an atom with its electrons in the lowest possible levels?

• Longitudinal design: Involves more than one testing which can span over spans of time. • Blind design: participant doesn’t know which condition they are in

• Double blind design: when experimenter and participant don’t know which condition

• Reliability: refers to the consistency of the measurement

• Validity

• Is it a valid measure?

• Refers to if the measure is actually measuring what you claim properly. Confounds

• “… a variable whose uncontrolled presence serves to confound your results possibly  leading to false conclusions.”

• Expectancy effects (Robert Rosenthal): expected results effect the outcome.   • blooming IQ test­ identifies who will excel. Gave teachers “feedback” on who  would or not excel. IQ scores compared and those of children who were predicted to blossom did. CATCH: no blooming test (placebo) results showed “bloomers”  did excel. Don't forget about the age old question of Define displacement.

• Attrition (longitudinal studies): sample size decreases due to drop­out • N=100 and studying correlation between age and risk taking, 20/40/60 yrs. old,  same participants tested at each age. At 60 yr. N=50 so correlation appears to  have decreased.

• Need to compare remaining samples results at each point.

• Cohort effects (cross­sectional studies): results vary due to background/experiences Does cynicism increase as age increases? Test different participants at each age and test them.  Find 20 yrs. less cynical that 60 yrs. appears to have a positive correlation. But the cohort of  20 may be diff from 60, 60 bring level of cynicism that was present when they were 20 due  to experience differences.

Generating Evidence

Research evidence

vs.

Personal knowledge

Want to separate personal knowledge from research evidence

Gave grandma and coffee example

Important because psychology is about ppl but need to be empirical

3

Scientific method: asking and answering questions

Research Method

• Hypothesis

• Data collection

• Data analysis

• Replication: IMPORTANT!!! 10 most important advances in science Mid life crisis: 40 men, most reported crisis around 40 yrs., when published couldn’t go  anywhere without seeing it.  BUT did not hold up could not be replicated. Exception vs. the  rule

In­class project

Research Question: What is the impact of television 

violence on children’s aggressive 

behavior?

Hypothesis: As exposure to television violence increases aggressive behavior in children  increases.

Distribution: randomly assign distributes differences in individuals equally—reduces systematic  bias

4

01­19­16

∙ Showed slide of 3 hands: man, woman, infant

∙ Reviewed syllabus

∙ Showed multiple slides of pictures

o What are changes from infancy to old age

∙ Show picture of a baby

∙ Originally assumed a blank slate 

∙ Shows old painting of young child in adult style clothing

o Assumed children mini adults

o Understand morality, makes good judgements, decision

∙ What ways does reasoning vary between adults and children

∙ Mickey Mouse math

∙ Research by Dr. Karen Wynn

o Found 5 month old like Michelle Follet reacted diff according to whether the # of  mickey mouse statuettes saw represented correct or correct addition

o Kid sitting on rocker ask bizarre question can 5 month old add and subtract? o Think when you started to add/subtract

o Wynn thought lacking ability

o Wynn encountered how to test babies

o Takes baby and placed on rocker then places in front of stage with mickey  Only find surprising if expecting to see 2 mickeys, will look longer

 Found babies look long when there are not 2 mickeys upon reveal

 Violates expectation process

∙ Found babies understand environment

∙ Showed diagram of test procedure

∙ Non­human; primate, Gorilla Koko

∙ Baby gorilla rescued by Penny Paterson in Cali

o Wanted to address is human language uniquely human, can other species use  language

o Other species can communicate but can they use language

 Ex bees: but hardwired and language is complex

 Will teach Koko ASL

 Video tapes all exchanges with Koko

∙ Comments regularly on environment with humans based on 

randomly selected clips in month period

∙ Ex. Listen quiet when an alarm stops

∙ Ex mike cry for another gorilla is tearing

∙ Ex that’s soft referring to a hat

∙ Penny signs what can you think of that’s hard and Koko responds 

rock and work

∙ Go over interactions between penny and Koko about newsletter and alligators ∙ Are adolescence mini adults

o Death penalty when tried as adults?

o Is development continuous

o Early experiences shape subsequent results

∙ If I want new Mozart what is necessary

∙ Practical ?’s

∙ Spanking ok or not

∙ How do we acquire right and wrong

∙ Real Life Tarzan

∙ Wild Child

∙ What happens if human infant is raised by diff species?

∙ Watched YouTube video portrait of Vince birth to 13 in 3.5 minutes

∙ What changes cognitive, physical, so on

01­21­16 Research Method

Key Constructs

• Hypothesis: informal definition­an educated guess about something works • Formal: tentative statement about the relationship between two or more variables. • Good hypotheses must be testable

• Ex the amount of aggression that children display is related to their level of inborn aggressiveness. Yes hypothesis but not testable.

• What is a variable: any stimulus that can vary in value

• Height

• Time

• Social class­as long as we can measure it

• Independent Variable: The experimental factor you manipulate, the treatment itself. • Dependent Variable: The behavior measured; the factor that might be affected by changes in the independent variable

• Operational Definitions: Specifies the operations and procedures that are used to define  the independent and dependent variables. (the details of what you did)

• Allows you to move from concrete to abstract.

• Very important to results

• Ex. Runaway defined as runaway with no preexisting safe place to go vs.  staying anywhere overnight w/o permission.

• Experimental group: the condition that exposes subjects to one version of independent  variable.

2

• Control group: a condition identical to the experimental one, except independent variable  has a different value, such as zero.

• Random selection: assigning subjects to conditions by chance, thus minimizing  preexisting differences between those in different conditions.

• Random assignment: same as random selection

• Experimental design

• Correlational design

• Cross­sectional design: always testing in relation to age, N consists of ppl at each age  group tested at same time, not same participants at each age.

• Longitudinal design: Involves more than one testing which can span over spans of time. • Blind design: participant doesn’t know which condition they are in

• Double blind design: when experimenter and participant don’t know which condition

• Reliability: refers to the consistency of the measurement

• Validity

• Is it a valid measure?

• Refers to if the measure is actually measuring what you claim properly. Confounds

• “… a variable whose uncontrolled presence serves to confound your results possibly  leading to false conclusions.”

• Expectancy effects (Robert Rosenthal): expected results effect the outcome.   • blooming IQ test­ identifies who will excel. Gave teachers “feedback” on who  would or not excel. IQ scores compared and those of children who were predicted to blossom did. CATCH: no blooming test (placebo) results showed “bloomers”  did excel.

• Attrition (longitudinal studies): sample size decreases due to drop­out • N=100 and studying correlation between age and risk taking, 20/40/60 yrs. old,  same participants tested at each age. At 60 yr. N=50 so correlation appears to  have decreased.

• Need to compare remaining samples results at each point.

• Cohort effects (cross­sectional studies): results vary due to background/experiences Does cynicism increase as age increases? Test different participants at each age and test them.  Find 20 yrs. less cynical that 60 yrs. appears to have a positive correlation. But the cohort of  20 may be diff from 60, 60 bring level of cynicism that was present when they were 20 due  to experience differences.

Generating Evidence

Research evidence

vs.

Personal knowledge

Want to separate personal knowledge from research evidence

Gave grandma and coffee example

Important because psychology is about ppl but need to be empirical

3

Scientific method: asking and answering questions

Research Method

• Hypothesis

• Data collection

• Data analysis

• Replication: IMPORTANT!!! 10 most important advances in science Mid life crisis: 40 men, most reported crisis around 40 yrs., when published couldn’t go  anywhere without seeing it.  BUT did not hold up could not be replicated. Exception vs. the  rule

In­class project

Research Question: What is the impact of television 

violence on children’s aggressive 

behavior?

Hypothesis: As exposure to television violence increases aggressive behavior in children  increases.

Distribution: randomly assign distributes differences in individuals equally—reduces systematic  bias

4

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here