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CSU - BC 103 - Life 103 3rd Week - Class Notes

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CSU - BC 103 - Life 103 3rd Week - Class Notes

School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life 103 3rd Week
Description: These notes cover the evolution and characteristics of fungi and seedless land plants, which will be on the first exam.
Uploaded: 02/05/2016
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background image Fungi fungi are heterotrophs and absorb nutrients from outside their bodies —use enzymes to break down complex molecules (catabolism) fungi and animals are more closely related to each other than they are to plants or 
other eukaryotes
where do fungi get their energy? —heterotrophs A. consume other animals —saprophytic A. decomposers
B. digestive enzymes excreted from surface
C. no stomach, grow into their own food
—symbiotic A. mycorrhizae, lichens —parasitic A. take energy from living host body structure —majority of fungal structure is underground  
—single-celled = “yeast”
—many are multicellular
—consist of mycelia: interwoven networks of branched tiny filaments with very 
high surface areas called hyphae —cell walls contain the polysaccharide chitin
—mushrooms are temporary reproductive structures 
mycorrhizae - mutually beneficial relationships between fungi and plant roots —mycorrhizal fungi deliver ions and minerals to plants
—plants supply fungi with organic nutrients
reproduction —fungi produce haploid spores 
—spores can be produced through sexual or asexual lifestyles
general sexual life cycle plasmogamy: union of cytoplasm from 2 parent mycelia
heterokaryon: haploid nuclei from each parent coexist before fusing 
karyogamy: nuclear fusion—>diploid cells
—meiosis—>spores produced—>germination in moist soil
general asexual life cycle —mycelium—>spore producing structures
—spores produced—>germination in moist soil
—entirely haploid throughout asexual life cycle
important fungal groups zygomycetes A. most ecologically diverse group
B. pathogens, soil, bread molds
background image glomeromycetes A. mycorrhizal symbiosis with plant roots “higher fungi” ascomycetes A. produce sexual spores in saclike asci contained in fruiting bodies  called ascocarps B. ex. fungus that makes penicillin basidiomycetes A. include mushrooms, puffballs, and shelf fungi
B. many are decomposers of wood
C. produce sexual spores in fruiting bodies called basidiocarps
D. rusts and smuts are pathogens in this group
lichen - symbiotic association between fungus (provides environment) and 
photosynthetic microorganism
—photosynthetic component is green algae (provide carbon compounds) or  cyanobacteria (provide organic nitrogen)

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School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life 103 3rd Week
Description: These notes cover the evolution and characteristics of fungi and seedless land plants, which will be on the first exam.
Uploaded: 02/05/2016
4 Pages 24 Views 19 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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