Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

CSU - BC 103 - Life 103, exam 1 study guide - Study Guide

Created by: Addy Carroll Elite Notetaker

> > > > CSU - BC 103 - Life 103, exam 1 study guide - Study Guide

CSU - BC 103 - Life 103, exam 1 study guide - Study Guide

School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life 103, exam 1 study guide
Description: Dr. Lockwood doesn't provide a study guide. I put all my notes for the past 3 weeks on one document, as he said that will be what to study, in addition to the material that will be covered on Monday. Additionally, he said to know life cycles. I also posted the quiz questions with the correct answers to use as a study tool.
Uploaded: 02/06/2016
0 5 3 85 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 17 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Life 103 Study Guide Exam 1  Phylogeny  •  Terminology  -Evolution: “The change in allele frequencies in a population over time.” 
As an allele is a specific version of a gene, this definition means that 
certain gene versions become more/less prominent in a population as time 
progresses. 
-Four ways evolution can occur 
 
1. Selection: “Changes in allele frequencies due to organisms with     advantageous alleles reproducing more successfully than                 organisms with other alleles.” This simply means that certain     organisms with one version of the gene reproduce more     frequently/with more success than other organisms.     2. Genetic Drift: “Random changes in allele frequencies in a     population.” In addition to just knowing this simple definition, it    might be helpful to note that these changes are completely based    on chance; for example, if a natural disaster happened to take out    more organisms with one allele than the organisms with a different    allele.    3. Mutation: “The source of all new allelic diversity.” This is an    evolutionary change that occurs on a more molecular level. The    actual gene sequence of an organism has to change.     4. Migration: “Movement of alleles between populations.” This    could happen, for example, if an organism having a certain allele    reproduces with an organism from another population where the     allele is never found to be present. Thus, this would introduce the    allele to the population.  -Adaptation: “A trait that evolves by selection for a particular function 
(because it increases fitness) from an ancestor that did not have that trait.”  
 
~ Adaptations can be morphological, behavioral, or molecular    ~Adaptations solve problems faced by populations and different     populations may have different solutions to similar problems  -Phylogeny: “The evolutionary relationships of a group of organisms 
(species level and higher)” 
-Phylogenetic tree: “Diagram of the ancestral relationships among 
species” (see “Phylogenetic trees” section below for more details” 
 
~Describe patterns    ~Provide information about when certain large events may have     occurred  •  Phylogenies show evolutionary relationships  -Taxonomy is the ordered division and naming of organisms 
-In the 18
th  century, Carl Linnaeus published a system of taxonomy based  on resemblances 
-Two key features of his system remain useful today: two-part names for 
species (see “binomial nomenclature” section below) and hierarchical 
classification (see “Hierarchical Classification” section below) 
background image •  Binomial Nomenclature  -The two-part scientific name of a species is called a binomial 
-The first part of the name is the genus 
-The second part, called the specific epithet, is unique for each species 
within the genus 
-The first letter of the genus is capitalized, and the entire species name is 
italicized 
 
Ex. Homo sapiens (human)  -Both parts together name the species (not the specific epithet alone)  •  Hierarchical Classification (see textbook figure 26.3)  -Linnaeus introduced a system for grouping species in increasingly broad 
categories 
-The taxonomic groups from broad (most inclusive) to narrow (least 
inclusive) are domain, kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, 
and species 
-A taxonomic unit at any level of hierarchy is called a taxon 
•  Phylogenetic trees   -Darwin used the metaphor of a tree to explain the relationship between 
similar species 
-How do we build these trees? 
 
~What type of evidence/data can we use to reconstruct a tree?    (see textbook figure 26.12)  1.  Morphological traits 
2.  Behavior 
3.  Chemical composition 
4.  Chromosome number 
5.  DNA 
~These types of data are called characters. It may be important to 
note, characters are not the same as characteristics. A 
characteristic is a specific character. For example, “In observing the 
character of hair color in the classroom, we saw that 69% of the 
students had the characteristic of blonde hair color.” 
~Character state: variation among characters 
•  Phylogenetic Tree Terminology (see textbook figures 26.5, 26.10)  -Each branch point represents the divergence (split) of two species 
-Sister taxa are groups that share an immediate common ancestor 
-A rooted tree includes a branch to represent the last common ancestor of 
all the taxa in the tree 
-A polytomy is a branch from which more than two groups emerge 
•  A simplified tree of life  -The tree of life suggests that animals and fungi are more closely related 
to each other than plants 
-The tree of life is based largely on rRNA (ribosomal RNA) genes, as 
these have evolved slowly 
 
Ecology 
background image •  Ecology (eco-=house, -ology=study of)  -The study of the distribution and interaction of organisms with other 
organisms and the environment 
-Word coined by Ernst Haeckel 
-Most interdisciplinary (involving two or more areas of knowledge) 
discipline in biology  
•  Organismal Ecology   -The study of the interaction of an organism and its environment 
-Behavioral Ecology 
 
~Response to stimulus     ~Foraging    ~Group interaction  -Evolutionary Ecology 
 
~Adaptations to the environment (see phylogeny notes for    adaptations)  -Events in ecological time (the length of time an organism experiences) 
influence evolutionary time processes 
•  Population Ecology  -A population is a group of individuals of the same species living in the 
same area 
-Population Ecology focuses on factors affecting how many individuals 
of a species live in an area 
 
~Most mathematically based subdivision of ecology  •  Community Ecology  -A community is a group of interacting populations of different species in 
an area  
-Community ecology deals with the whole array of interacting species in a 
community 
•  Ecosystem Ecology   -An ecosystem is the community of organisms in an area and the physical 
factors with which they interact 
-Ecosystem ecology emphasizes energy flow and chemical cycling among 
the various biotic and abiotic components 
 
~Movement of carbon, nitrogen, and other chemicals through the     ecosystem    ~Climate change  •  Ecological interactions  -Organisms and Environment 
-Species Distributions 
 
~Range limitations  -Environment is composed of: 
 
1. Biotic factors (living; see “Biotic Factors” section below)    2. Abiotic factors (nonliving; see “Abiotic Factors” section below)  •  Biotic Factors  -Organisms interacting with other species 
 
~Interactions can be positive, negative, or neutral 
background image     Ex.) plant/pollinator              predator/prey              herbivore/plant              competition   •  Abiotic Factors  -Nonliving parts of the environment  
 
~Chemical      Ex.) pH, salinity    ~Physical      Ex.) weather (temperature, moisture, soil), light, nutrients             (O 2 , N 2 •  Dispersal   -The movement of individuals 
 
~One way trip, while migration is a round trip  -Dispersal is natural 
 
Bacteria and Archaea 
 
-Prokaryotes are made up of two domains      1. Bacteria      2. Archaea   •  The problem with prokaryotes  -Biologically, prokaryotes are a non-monophyletic group (see textbook 
figure 26.10a and/or phylogeny notes)  
-Thus, the term prokaryote is not a biologically sensible term 
•  Bacteria and Archaea  -Life is mostly single-celled 
-Highly adaptable (see adaptation in phylogeny notes) 
 
~live just about everywhere    ~hot, cold, acid, sulphurous, salty conditions  -Vast numbers 
 
~More bacteria in a cup of soil than the number of humans that         have ever existed  -Very high genetic diversity 
-Bacteria are unicellular, although some species form colonies 
-Most bacteria are 0.5-5 micrometers, much smaller than the 10-100 
micrometers of many eukaryotic cells  
-Bacterial cells have a variety of shapes (see textbook figure 27.2) 
 
~The three most common shapes are spheres (cocci), rods (bacilli),      and spirals  •  Cell Walls  -Most bacteria have them 
-Maintains shape 
-Physical protection 
-Prevents bursting in hypotonic environment  
  -Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, a network of sugar polymers        cross-linked by polypeptides 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
17 Pages 64 Views 51 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life 103, exam 1 study guide
Description: Dr. Lockwood doesn't provide a study guide. I put all my notes for the past 3 weeks on one document, as he said that will be what to study, in addition to the material that will be covered on Monday. Additionally, he said to know life cycles. I also posted the quiz questions with the correct answers to use as a study tool.
Uploaded: 02/06/2016
17 Pages 64 Views 51 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Recommended Documents
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 103 - Study Guide
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 103 - Study Guide

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here