×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UCLA - MODER 23 - Study Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UCLA - MODER 23 - Study Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UCLA / Art History / ART HIS 23 / Who is edouard manet?

Who is edouard manet?

Who is edouard manet?

Description

School: University of California - Los Angeles
Department: Art History
Course: Modernism
Professor: George baker
Term: Winter 2016
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Midterm Study Guide
Description: This is a study guide for the midterm. It includes all lecture notes up to the end of Week 5, which provides analysis of the paintings studied in class, historical context, and the definitions of key terms that need to be included on the painting analysis portion of the exam.
Uploaded: 02/09/2016
18 Pages 19 Views 9 Unlocks
Reviews

Mr. Granville Champlin (Rating: )

Killer notes! I'm stoked I can finally just pay attention in class!!!



Edouard Manet 


Who is edouard manet?



• Music in the Tuileries, 1862 o Sense the painter turning away from large painting s which told stories fro  mythology or the bible 

o Focises on urban and daily life, a public/crowd in public space to hear a musical performance  o Less political 

o Figures of the day, leaders/people who are not gods 

o Art style: less precise brush strokes, turns away from detail and precision of traditional times that the  western tradition enforced 

o He was the first to go away from it, and as a result received harsh criticism Thomas Couture 

• The Romans of the Decadence, 1847 

• He trained Manet 

• One of the more innovative academic painters, he would put wet paint on without letting the previous  coat dry fuly 


How is van gogh as an artist?



If you want to learn more check out What did wundt and titchener contribute to psychology

• Inspired by powety about Roman imperia forces and their lve for wealth and slendor that then led to the  fall of the empire 

• Compared to the status of the French during this time as the people forgot about the revolutionary spirit   Manet, Spanish Singer, 1860.  Victorine in the Costume of an Espada, 1862 

• Clear brush strokes, not the smooth finish of the academy 

• Victorine Meurent was a model for Manet multiple times 

• Artificial costumes o Singer is dressed in a seemingly nonsensical outfit, wrong handed guitar o Female  bullfighter, seems to be dressed in drag 

• Spanish culture o Why are they wearing/engaging in this culture? Napoleon III, the new emporer of  France, had married a Spanish aristocrat 


Who painted la orana maria?



• Painterly Painters o Loosening up how they used paint to draw out its qualities and color instead of  making it appear to be a sculpture 

o Anti­classical values MAnet, The Old Musician, 1862 

• Landscape seems given over, cloudy undefined background. NO cities/buildings. Probably on the outside  of the city 

• The characters aren’t aristocratic, they are poor (tattered clothes) and worn down (half standing, lifeless)  • Thinking about Velazquez “Los Barachos”, 1629. Essentially copies it into his own painting. In this time  period, copying was encouraged and seen as respectful of past artists  If you want to learn more check out High concentration of hydrogen ions means a solution is what?

• Basis in the western tradition because of the religious idea that men are created in the image of god  • Wattear, Gilles 1718 o A painting about a painting 

o A mime is the subject, seems to be grown up from the boy in The Old Musician o Also copies himself in  “The Absinthe Drinker” 1858 and “The Rag Picker” 1869 

Manet, Dejeuner Sur L’Herbe (Luncheon on the Grass), 1863 

• Manet’s paintings are rejected along with 3,000 paintings that were submitted by other artists. These  paintings went to the Salon of Rejects  

• Again seems to be figures from the past o 2 men, 2 women o One of the women is nude 

o None are looking toward each other, they are all looking in other directions and seem to be disassociated  with each other 

• Combines landscape, nude, still life, history 

• Copies poses of the art of the Renaissance past 

• If this is a painting that has sorf of sloppy brush strokes, lacks a story, an combines so many genres, its  more a painting about paiting and more outlined as a moment in time rather than a painting that is meant  to be read as a story  If you want to learn more check out Who is the author of the wealth of nations?

• The bird frozen in flight shows that it is a snapshot 

• Addresses our ability to see and our other senses 

• Underlines that it is not complete 

Manet, Portrait of M. and Mme. Manet, 1860 

• He’s painting his family and dresses them in clothes from paintings of the past  • Eyes that don’t see or interact, seem to gaze at nothing. Positioned as if they are oblivious that people are  looking at it 

Manet, The Nymph Surprised, 1861 

• Nude female body, staring at the viewer 

• She seems to suddenly whirl her head toward us 

• Based on the biblical story of the bathing woman who is surprised by elderly men spying on her while she is bathing 

• Modermism is a form of medium specificity  

• A form of self criticism 

o What is most crusicl to understanding painting is the optic realm 

• Invokes art, history, stories 

• Seeing it, viewing it, not living it  We also discuss several other topics like What is wallace's theory of natural selection?

• The connection of painting to text is broken down 

Manet, Olympia 1863 

• Painted at the same time as Luncheon on the Lawn 

• Sent to the salon, where it was accepted. However, there was much scandal and outrage regarding this  work 

• Similar to Titian’s Venus of Urbine, 1538 o Naked Venus, Goddess of Love, laying on a sort of bed  • The genre of the nude o To start modernism with the genre of the nude is significant because the human  body is the center of paintings, the letters/words of a painting   We also discuss several other topics like What is a molarity?

o Provoked outcry and confusion because critics didn’t know how to read it 

• She confronts the viewer with her gaze and is unreadable 

• Challenges the viewer in a way that can’t be figured out 

• Lacks euphemisms and clues 

• Goas against the classical types of nude 

• Starting point of that form of self­critique where tradition and the academy is challenged  • Perspective no longer seems to be operative; the space is not only shallow but flat  • Not a nude body dressed like the gods o The space of a brothel not the heavens Cananee, The Birth of  Venus, 1863  If you want to learn more check out What are the types of rock?

• She is laying horizontally, passively 

• Brings the female nude back to tradition as with Venus 

• Not challenging the norms of the times or the relationship between genders 

• William Adolphe Bouguereau, Nymphs and Satyr, 1873 o Every aspect of the female body is presented o Male fantasy in France during this time period Francois Aubert, Maximillians Shirt, June 1867 

• Picture of a shirt of the executed emperor of the 2nd Mexican empire 

• Maximillian was an Austrian aristocrat who was made emperor when Napoleon III appointed him Manet,  The Execution of Maximillian, 1867 

• Loose scumble of the paint and lack of a lot of detail 

• Uses language that causes it to be censored by the government 

• He couldn’t complete the work, ended up redoing it twice 

• The second painting is more complete, but ends up being cut into pieces by his step son  o the sword of  the officer is raised as it would be before the soldiers fired, however they are already shooting in the  painting. This causes disconnects in the story 

o the third version has the smoke from the guns firing while they are shooting which is also an  inconsistency with the logical sequence of events 

January 19, 2016

Manet, The Exocution of Maximillian, 1867

∙ He was attempting to paint something he knew would be censored

∙ Unfinished, looks like a sketch

∙ Endless repetition in the painting

∙ Form itself is in progress, much like the public knowledge of this event

The third Version

∙ Switches to a sturdy border with everything in its place

∙ Leaves a place in the painting for the viewer, seen by the shadow on the ground ∙ The painting is read from right to left (opposed to traditional left to right of history  painting) with the viewer placed toward the right side

∙ Very flat, shallow

∙ There are viewers on the back wall

o Some excited, others inscrutable

∙ One prisoner seems to be in between life and death, the other two are waiting to be shot

∙ The contradictions and unfinished aspects show that modernism isn’t going ot be  monumental or stable. It will habe political and social lessons

∙ The sketch and unfinished becomes the essence of modernism

Poussin, the Israelites Gathering Manna, 1637­8

∙ Debatedin the French academy as how a history painting should tell stores ∙ Previously, before modernis,, the idea was that your painting was based in texts and  illustrated those characters

∙ Ut pictora oasis

o “in painting as in poetry, in poetry as in painting”

o Poetry and painting are one, paintings were meant to be read just like a story Claude Monet, Impression, Sunrise. 1872

∙ No varnishes or depth

∙ Thinness in painting

∙ About subjective relationships to the world as opposed to objective views Manet, Woman in a Garden, 1867

∙ Figure painting is in crisis

∙ Four figures, landscape of nature created by man and culturally made place ∙ Same individual each time

∙ Fleeing into space, into the medium

∙ Not something he paints indoors on large scales based on what he remembers, as was the  academic tradition

o he rejects the space of the studio and uses outdoor light

o eventually the large canvases are done away with and small scale canvases, much  quicker paiting is needed

Monet, The woman in the Green Dress, 1866

Monet, Le dejeuner sur l’herbe, 1865­66

∙ uses his wife as a model often

∙ shows leisure

Monet, Terrace at Sainte­Adresse, 1867

∙ paint/visual brushstrokes are used/seen

∙ secne about everyday life and leisure

∙ the sean seems to be unbounded and purely optical

∙ depicts the act of looking and gazing

∙ the horizon line is 2/3 up the painting, which puts the viewer up and makes them seem to  be floating up above the scene

∙ three zones that hug the 2 dimensional aspect and vancas of the painting o terrace, sea, sky

∙ looks outside the European tradition to japan and borrows their devices Monet, Boulevard des Capucines. 1872

o painted through the window of one of Monet’s friends apartments

o His friend, NAdar, was one of the most famous photographers of the time.

o He rented out his space to the new group of anti­traditional artists so they could  meet and exhibit their works

o Boulevarda and avenues were large and constructed for more functionality and made  transportation easier

o New apartments that had to be uniform lined the streets

o There is dead, lifeless nature in the center

o Anti­classicism, organized against symmetry and balance

o Pieter bruegal, Hunters in the Snow, 1565

o Landscape organized towards a point that’s not in the center

January 21, 2016

Bruegal, Children’s Games, 1560

∙ Birds eye view is used to show the social aspect of the scene

∙ No center point of interest, instead the vanishing point is in the far right of the canvas  following the road

∙ Everything is unfixed. There is mayhem and its disharmonious

∙ The body is everywhere in motion

∙ Painted as part of a series of worls that show the world turned upside down Terms:

Chiaroscuro: refers to shading, shadows used to give dimension with black paint. This was  absent for most of impressionism

Plein air: “painting out of doors”, outside the studio. Meant you had to paint quicker using  smaller canvases

Facture: unfinished painting, visible brush strokes. You can see the way paint is applied to the  canvas. In academic practice, you didn’t see this.

Impasto: built up thickness, almost a crust of paint

Monet, Regatta at Argenteuil, 1872

∙ Employed facture and impasto

∙ He didn’t water his paint down as traditional artists would

Degas, Place de la Concorde, 1875

∙ City­scape, social square of a city

∙ The high raised horizon line contributes to the flatness of the work

∙ The center has yellow, thick paint, which then makes the rest of the figures radiate from  that point

∙ He paints his friend, who was also an aristocrat, with his daughters

∙ The metaphor is figures walking/moving through a public space

∙ Empty gazes and a lot of empty space

o Everyone is distracted, no one is paying attention to one another

∙ Anti­classical form (open center, figures are cut off, off­tilt walking) is echoed in the  subjects as they are isolated although physically together

Degas, Young Spartans Exercising, 1860

∙ Degas began as a history painter and was more traditional

∙ His painting does have a sense of classical nature, but he falls short of achieving the  desired effect

Gustave Cailebotte, Young man at his Window, 1875. Man at his bath, 1884 ∙ Consistant tactic of oblique lines that place all figures into motion and instability ∙ Looking at them from the back

∙ One of the few male nudes

o Possibly used to habe viewers, normally males, compare the bodies to their own  and be connected with the painting in that way

Cailebotte, Paris Street, Rainy Day, 1877

∙ Most famous impressionist painting in the U.S.

∙ Light pole enhances the center focus

∙ Reflected light on the street from the rain

∙ Dillenation of umbrellas, givel all views of figures but then very obvious open spaces that provide depth

Cailebotte, Le Pont de l’Europe, 1876­77

∙ Characters all to one side

∙ We are deprived of the infinite depth by the X of the bridge

o We don’t know what the figures are looking at

∙ Same level as the figures, allows the viewer to participate

Flaneur: 

∙ Wanderer, figure that Caillebotte speaks about. 

∙ They are in the crowd but above it. Not included in the masses. 

∙ Aspect of mobility/movement

∙ Impressionist painters used these figures and echoed them

∙ Figures seen visually, but not engaged with the events

Degas, Absinthe, 1876 & Manet, The Plum, 1878

∙ Oblique lines in motion

∙ Bodies separated from the viewer, off center and solitary

Pierre­Auguste Renoir, Le Moulin de la Gallette, 1876

∙ Painting in the area where workers and common people met and socialized Renoir, the Swing, 1876

∙ Painting in the area where workers and common people met and socialized Monet, La Grenouillere, 1869

∙ Broken down, dissolved brush strokes

∙ Repression of line/tradition

Caillebotte, Calf’s Head and Ox Tongue, 1882

∙ As if he’s trying to paint flesh itself

∙ Play w/ forms, reinvents what you paint and how

Monet, Gare St. Lazarre, 1877

∙ Goes to the train stations of paris

∙ Mist/steam dissolve the lines and solidity of objects

Monet, Unloading Coal, 1872

∙ Working class, blackness and omnimity

Monet, The Poplans, 1891

∙ Disassociating his painting from the viewer, can be upside down and is still readable Janurary 26, 2016

Monet, Water Lillies, 1903 and 1915

∙ Monet was blind when he died

∙ He painted this painting multiple times

∙ Dematerialixed optial space of light and water

∙ Sky above, water beneath all at once

∙ Groundless floating optical space that surrounds the viewer

Modernist painting orientates itself toward physical sight more than any other sense ∙ Emploration of purely optical properties, based on an experience of separation from  narrative story telling/history painting and became more about painting itself ∙ Freedom and autonomy

Women in Impressionism

∙ Mary Cassatt and Borthe Morisot were two women of the impressionish group. The  challenging of traditional painting allowed painting to be opened more to women and the  working class like Renoir

Cassatt, In the Loge, 1879

∙ Woman watching an opera/show, there is a man in the background clearly watching her ∙ Self criticality or reflexivity

∙ The logic of looking/the gaze

∙ Geneder specifity of the time period

o Woman looking at a cultural event

o Man (society) looking at her as an object

Cassatt, The Family, 1892

∙ Themes and subjects of femail social roles and domesticity

o Seems to underline the ways that women were suppressed in society

Cassatt, Baby’s First Caress, 1890 & Mother About to Wash Her Sleepy Child, 1880 ∙ Naked babies, based on traditional paintings of the Virgin Mary with baby Jesus  ∙ Exploration of the visual ecperience of maternity. The viewer is pressed up close to the  relationship

Cassatt, Mother and CHid, 1889 & Maternal Caress, 1896

∙ Broken brush strokes, full of color

∙ Still focused on physical qualities, contact between bodies

Berthe Morisot, Psyche, 1876 & The Wet Nurse Angele Feeding Julie Manet, 1860 ∙ Painting her own wet nurse, subject matter of maternity

o Kind of labor, working class body forking for her

o Two bodies pressed together

∙ What is being given to be seen is also being erased at the same time

Cassatt, AL Toilette, 1891 & Mother’s Kiss, 1891

∙ Not just the labor and work of maternity, but the physical connection of the subjects MAnet, A Bar at the FOlies BErgeres, 1882

∙ Modernist/impressionist engagements with looking

∙ Mirror in the back stops our gaze, yet also extends it behind her

∙ Experience of a worker and isolation in her facial expression where she is disengaged  with the viewer

Post Impressionism

∙ Georges Seurat, Bathers Asnieres, 1883­84

o Rejected form the salon of academic ainting, goes to the salon of independents o Subjects impressionism to intense criticism

 Outdoor scene, summer time suburban leisure, signs of work (factories,  clothing)

 Broken brush strokes are miniaturized, deliberate, and evenly distributed o Rushes back harmony, line drawing, symmetry

o Painted in a studio the academic way

o Classicism returns with the boy calling out like a river god in Rafael’s Gallata o Goes back to the Egyptians with the immobilization of bodies and rigidity of form o Progress of 3 main figures’ legs

 Is he going back or moving forward to the advancements in film and 

cinema that captures movement individually

∙ Thomas Eakins, The Swimming Hole, 1884­85

o Language of French realism, not broken strokes

o Partakes in none of the shifts in painting

o Brings back the pastoral, the language of the nude

o Given in stages of an action scene

o Basing male nudes on classical subjects

 Shares this with Seurat, who wanted to confront the formlessness of 

impressionism

∙ Seurat, Bed du Hoc at Grandcamp, 1885

o Centers the cliff in the painting, which is anti­impressionist

o Broken brush strokes, starts with longer cross hatches then goes to points that are  all equal in size (pointalism, chromalism)

∙ Seurat, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, 1889

o Critical of the fluidity of impressionism

o Working class and bourgeouse together in a space

o Again, stone like and rigid like Egyptian art

o Chromo­luminerism, divisionism, paintilism

o Anti expressive type of painting

o Things don’t add up in this work

 Oblique lines, rigid bodies, the vanishing point is on the very far left

o Seems to be the completion of the painting with the bathing boys

o Attempts to engage with a scene of leisure

o Not utopian, instead there is a sense of melancholy and isolation

 This view is missing the point that this is meant to be an anarchic painting  Casting down of all hierarchies

January 28, 2016

Seurat, Le Chahut, 1889 & Les Poseuses, 1886

o Wants to paint like a machine

o Borrows from mass culture

o Comparing the ambitions of large scale painting to advertisements

o He puts painting before of the lawn inside his new one

o Internal look at the practice of art

o Repetition and rigidity of body

o Almost mechanic, speaks to how he wants to engage in modern mass culture Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, Summer, 1873

o Strangely generalized classicism

o Old genre of the pastoral

o Are they dreams of a utopian culture

o Illustrations of a timelessness and a reconciliation between nature and man Gauguin, Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going?,1897 o Exagerations of color that seem to break from the science of color

o Formal trandformation of the color form the modernists

Gauguin, The Vision After the Sermon, 1888 & The Yellow Christ, 1889 o The artist had been a broker, but left that to pursue his hobby in art

o Not formed by entering the academy then later rejecting those teachings. Instead  he is the first artist to have been formed by modernism

o Wants to move to northern france to paint the peasants and folklore there instead  of urban life

o The vision

o No horizon line, no perspectural space

o Devoted to female bodies

o Returns to black lines, to drawing

 Outlinean form ends up being named

 Its like they are regressing, going back in time

o Cloisonisme: named after the dark lead paint in medieval stained glass windows.  The word for the dark outlines seen in this painting

o Yellow Christ

 Given to the viewer as visionary and unrealistic

 Hes painting the spiritual and the sacred

Gustave Moreau. The Apparition, 1876

o Not necessarily classic or modern

o Given to us in the of the female figure, who is evil or fatal

Odilon Redon, Cyclops, 1895­1900

o Deeply anti­naturalistic

Manet, Portrait of Zola, 1867

o Emile Zola was a literary man

There are tokens from different cultures throughout the painting

January 19, 2016

Manet, The Exocution of Maximillian, 1867

∙ He was attempting to paint something he knew would be censored

∙ Unfinished, looks like a sketch

∙ Endless repetition in the painting

∙ Form itself is in progress, much like the public knowledge of this event The third Version

∙ Switches to a sturdy border with everything in its place

∙ Leaves a place in the painting for the viewer, seen by the shadow on the ground

∙ The painting is read from right to left (opposed to traditional left to right of history  painting) with the viewer placed toward the right side

∙ Very flat, shallow

∙ There are viewers on the back wall

o Some excited, others inscrutable

∙ One prisoner seems to be in between life and death, the other two are waiting to be shot

∙ The contradictions and unfinished aspects show that modernism isn’t going ot be  monumental or stable. It will habe political and social lessons

∙ The sketch and unfinished becomes the essence of modernism

Poussin, the Israelites Gathering Manna, 1637­8

∙ Debatedin the French academy as how a history painting should tell stores

∙ Previously, before modernis,, the idea was that your painting was based in texts and  illustrated those characters

∙ Ut pictora oasis

o “in painting as in poetry, in poetry as in painting”

o Poetry and painting are one, paintings were meant to be read just like a story

Claude Monet, Impression, Sunrise. 1872

∙ No varnishes or depth

∙ Thinness in painting

∙ About subjective relationships to the world as opposed to objective views Manet, Woman in a Garden, 1867

∙ Figure painting is in crisis

∙ Four figures, landscape of nature created by man and culturally made place ∙ Same individual each time

∙ Fleeing into space, into the medium

∙ Not something he paints indoors on large scales based on what he remembers, as was the  academic tradition

o he rejects the space of the studio and uses outdoor light

o eventually the large canvases are done away with and small scale canvases, much  quicker paiting is needed

Monet, The woman in the Green Dress, 1866

Monet, Le dejeuner sur l’herbe, 1865­66

∙ uses his wife as a model often

∙ shows leisure

Monet, Terrace at Sainte­Adresse, 1867

∙ paint/visual brushstrokes are used/seen

∙ secne about everyday life and leisure

∙ the sean seems to be unbounded and purely optical

∙ depicts the act of looking and gazing

∙ the horizon line is 2/3 up the painting, which puts the viewer up and makes them seem to  be floating up above the scene

∙ three zones that hug the 2 dimensional aspect and vancas of the painting o terrace, sea, sky

∙ looks outside the European tradition to japan and borrows their devices

Monet, Boulevard des Capucines. 1872

o painted through the window of one of Monet’s friends apartments

o His friend, NAdar, was one of the most famous photographers of the time.

o He rented out his space to the new group of anti­traditional artists so they could  meet and exhibit their works

o Boulevarda and avenues were large and constructed for more functionality and made  transportation easier

o New apartments that had to be uniform lined the streets

o There is dead, lifeless nature in the center

o Anti­classicism, organized against symmetry and balance

o Pieter bruegal, Hunters in the Snow, 1565

o Landscape organized towards a point that’s not in the center

January 21, 2016

Bruegal, Children’s Games, 1560

∙ Birds eye view is used to show the social aspect of the scene

∙ No center point of interest, instead the vanishing point is in the far right of the canvas  following the road

∙ Everything is unfixed. There is mayhem and its disharmonious

∙ The body is everywhere in motion

∙ Painted as part of a series of worls that show the world turned upside down Terms:

Chiaroscuro: refers to shading, shadows used to give dimension with black paint. This was  absent for most of impressionism

Plein air: “painting out of doors”, outside the studio. Meant you had to paint quicker using  smaller canvases

Facture: unfinished painting, visible brush strokes. You can see the way paint is applied to the  canvas. In academic practice, you didn’t see this.

Impasto: built up thickness, almost a crust of paint

Monet, Regatta at Argenteuil, 1872

∙ Employed facture and impasto

∙ He didn’t water his paint down as traditional artists would

Degas, Place de la Concorde, 1875

∙ City­scape, social square of a city

∙ The high raised horizon line contributes to the flatness of the work

∙ The center has yellow, thick paint, which then makes the rest of the figures radiate from  that point

∙ He paints his friend, who was also an aristocrat, with his daughters

∙ The metaphor is figures walking/moving through a public space

∙ Empty gazes and a lot of empty space

o Everyone is distracted, no one is paying attention to one another

∙ Anti­classical form (open center, figures are cut off, off­tilt walking) is echoed in the  subjects as they are isolated although physically together

Degas, Young Spartans Exercising, 1860

∙ Degas began as a history painter and was more traditional

∙ His painting does have a sense of classical nature, but he falls short of achieving the  desired effect

Gustave Cailebotte, Young man at his Window, 1875. Man at his bath, 1884 ∙ Consistant tactic of oblique lines that place all figures into motion and instability ∙ Looking at them from the back

∙ One of the few male nudes

o Possibly used to habe viewers, normally males, compare the bodies to their own  and be connected with the painting in that way

Cailebotte, Paris Street, Rainy Day, 1877

∙ Most famous impressionist painting in the U.S.

∙ Light pole enhances the center focus

∙ Reflected light on the street from the rain

∙ Dillenation of umbrellas, givel all views of figures but then very obvious open spaces that provide depth

Cailebotte, Le Pont de l’Europe, 1876­77

∙ Characters all to one side

∙ We are deprived of the infinite depth by the X of the bridge

o We don’t know what the figures are looking at

∙ Same level as the figures, allows the viewer to participate

Flaneur: 

∙ Wanderer, figure that Caillebotte speaks about. 

∙ They are in the crowd but above it. Not included in the masses. 

∙ Aspect of mobility/movement

∙ Impressionist painters used these figures and echoed them

∙ Figures seen visually, but not engaged with the events

Degas, Absinthe, 1876 & Manet, The Plum, 1878

∙ Oblique lines in motion

∙ Bodies separated from the viewer, off center and solitary

Pierre­Auguste Renoir, Le Moulin de la Gallette, 1876

∙ Painting in the area where workers and common people met and socialized Renoir, the Swing, 1876

∙ Painting in the area where workers and common people met and socialized Monet, La Grenouillere, 1869

∙ Broken down, dissolved brush strokes

∙ Repression of line/tradition

Caillebotte, Calf’s Head and Ox Tongue, 1882

∙ As if he’s trying to paint flesh itself

∙ Play w/ forms, reinvents what you paint and how

Monet, Gare St. Lazarre, 1877

∙ Goes to the train stations of paris

∙ Mist/steam dissolve the lines and solidity of objects

Monet, Unloading Coal, 1872

∙ Working class, blackness and omnimity

Monet, The Poplans, 1891

∙ Disassociating his painting from the viewer, can be upside down and is still readable February 2, 2016

Vincent Van Gogh, Self-Portrait, 1888

∙ Studio of the south, where he hoped painters and artists could come together and paint in the warn sunny climate of southern France

∙ Seeing oneself as another

o Van Gogh paints himself as a monk/Japanese

o Turns back past European culture and classicism

Primitivism: Travel back away from the now, Gauguin had always had been called to the past. His parents left France in 1850 and moved their family to Peru

Gauguin, Bay of the Bretagne, 1889 & Two Tahitian Women, 1899

∙ He moves himself not just out of Paris or France but out of Europe all together ∙ Followed France’s colonial objectives

∙ Uses unnatural colors

o Paste, chalky, white flesh

o Green, yellow tint of the women

∙ The nude is now experiencing a shift in gender (female to male) and age  (adult to child)

o Also now has non-European subject

∙ The boy is positioned beneath us and temporally before us

o The body is deeply troubled by the fragmentation and unfinishedness o This is not a child of innocence

∙ He has a somewhat problematic sex, the boys genitals seem to be defaced. ∙ With the Tahitian women…

o nothing has to do with the natural skin or color that would be seen on  these women

o Turning to a temporal and special otherness

o Confronts racial ideals and the implications of one’s race

o Neither face meets the viewers gaze, but they present their half nudity to the viewer, as Gauguin underlines with props of flowers

o Not an attempt to transcribe reality, but it’s a fantasy

Gauguin, Spirit of the Dead Watching, 1882

∙ Painted toward the end of this first trip to Tahiti

∙ This was one of his first lovers who was given to him by a neighbor family o The girl was only 13 at the time. He was 50

∙ He talks about how she was silent and reserved then they became more  acquainted and taught each other the names of stars

∙ Attaches a story to this painting

o He had gone to town and came back too late. It was dark and the lamp had gone out, he opens the door and sees his mistress looking at him  with a look of fear.  

o There is a demon figure in the background

o He wanted to paint her in the nude but couldn’t do so with a tone of  lust/sex so he chose fear

Degas, After the Bath, 1866 & The Tub, 1886

∙ Never let go of the body

∙ Where does it exist? The stage, the brothel, and domestic privacy ∙ Seem not to be classicizing at all

o They are fragmented, and shown from behind

Renoir, The Large Bathers, 1884-87

∙ Everything is about the visual pleasure

∙ Its utopia, the body is shown from all sides

Gauguin, Exotic Eve, 1890 & The Loss of Virginity, 1890-91

∙ Reaction to the utopian nude of Renoir

∙ Not painterly art

∙ Themes of the fall of purity to impurity

∙ Ambiguity of a return to origin/culture

Gauguin, The Birth of Christ, 1896

∙ Back to his religious paintings

∙ Translated into items that Tahitians would realize in relation to the nativity  scene

Boucher, Odalisque, 1745

∙ Oblique lines

∙ Back view of the woman

∙ Influenced Dead Spirit Watching

Gauguin, Ya Orana Maria, 1891 & Mahana No Atua, 1894

∙ Conversion to Christianity is shown here as he puts the Tahitians into  European scenes

Gauguin, Where do we come from…., 1897

∙ Summary of his primitive painting

∙ Ironizing the questions about Tahitian origins

∙ A painting form the past, arises from an archaic site

∙ Wanted to have t read from right to left

∙ Dislocated spaces, non-coherent symbols

∙ Lines that flow like water through the painting

∙ Looks like a forest space where one confronts darkness and distance/sight ∙ Spiritual visions of his work are intensified and more easily identified ∙ Dreamscape/fantasy-scape

∙ Figures are disjoint form each other

o Seem to be in different landscapes, don’t interact

∙ No clear answer to the questions in the work of for the artists ∙ Involves an attempt to engage with the eyes of European subjects who gaze  upon it

February 2, 2016

Gauguin, Self-Portrait 1889 & Self Portrait with Idol, 1893

∙ Assertion of art and fantast/dream, lack of reality

∙ Beginning of abstraction, no more copying the way the world appears ∙ Subjectivity and identity are at stake

o Not about the typical European male

o He paints himself as St. John beheaded alongside a scared Tahitian idol Van Gogh, Self-Portrait, 1889

∙ He paints at least 40 self portraits

∙ Embraces change, the self becomes different

o Opposed to cultural difference without, there is the darkness within ∙ Takes paint, light, and color as far as impressionism can go. Paint as paint,  and paint as light

∙ Ambitions for political art, both died very young

∙ Thick brush strokes, blue color scheme takes over both the background and  foreground

∙ Assertion that the eyes are seeing past what is viewable

Van Gogh, The Shoes with Laces, 1886-88 and The Potato Eaters, 1885

∙ Started as an artist late in life

∙ Painted in relationship to a palate of dust, dirt, ad Earth

∙ Realism

∙ Personifications of beings, the laborers

o Female shoe and male shoe

∙ Identifying with their labor, but has the paint become part of what they are

Tenebrism: shadows, darkness sense of a deep movement from black. Flight from  the modern, going back into the 1600’s with Rembrandt, self-portrait & slaughtered  Ox 1658

Van Gogh, The irises, 1889

o Everything is in motion, like its alive

o Not just about flowers, but the genital organs of the plants

Van Gogh, The Starry Night, 1889

o Began to think about metaphors for the way he applied his thick paint o Interested in the way his paint lines could be similar to textiles

Van Gogh, Harvesting Wheat…, 1888

∙ Spermatic language of his paint

∙ Life giving aspects of his paint

∙ Return to peasant laborers

∙ Staring into the sun itself

Van Gogh, The sower, 1888

∙ The sun became doubled: the ideal sun (the heavens/God) compared to the  rotten sun (madness)

∙ Deeply engaged in the natural

∙ Coples Millet, The Sower, 1850

∙ Stare up, directly into the night

Van Gogh, La Berceuse, 1889

∙ On of five paintings of her

∙ Cared for by them, is distressed about how people have to take care of him ∙ Solar-colored, excessive light

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here