×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 102 - Study Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 102 - Study Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

CSU / Life Science / LIFE 102 / life 102 csu exam 1

life 102 csu exam 1

life 102 csu exam 1

Description

School: Colorado State University
Department: Life Science
Course: Attributes of Living Systems
Professor: Louis bjostad
Term: Spring 2016
Tags: Biology
Cost: 50
Name: Life 102
Description: This study guide covers chapter 1-7, and is arranged in an outline format for each chapter with key words and phrases highlighted.
Uploaded: 02/11/2016
16 Pages 12 Views 10 Unlocks
Reviews

Giovanna Yost (Rating: )

Why didn't I know about this earlier? This notetaker is awesome, notes were really good and really detailed. Next time I really need help, I know where to turn!



Exam 1 Study Guide


How do atoms bond?



(Chapters 1-7)

Life 102

Prof. Louis Bjostad

HIGHLIGHT: Key Terms HIGHLIGHT: key concept

CHAPTER ONE

CELL 

● lowest level or organization

● performs life

● enclosed by membrane 

● use DNA for genetic coding 

● ability to divide  

Eukaryotic Cell 

Prokaryotic Cell

big: 1000X volume of prokaryote membrane enclosed organelles membrane enclosed nucleus

animal and plant cells

small

no membrane enclosed nucleus DNA is in region called nucleoid no membrane enclosed organelles bacteria

DIVERSITY OF LIFE

● 1.8 million identified species, estimate 10X that 

● taxonomy: study of naming/ classifying new species 

● Grouping of life 

○ Domain­Kingdom­Phyla­Class­Order­Family­Genus­Species ○ Acronym to remember: Did King Phil Come Over For Good Sex? ● 3 domains of life 


What is a chemical reactions?



○ Bacteria= Prokaryote

■ first form of life

■ more bacteria than any other cell in our bodies

○ Archaea=Prokaryote

■ resemble bacteria and eukarya

■ Extremophiles can live in very hot/ salty environments 

○ Eukarya = eukaryote

■ protists: single celled 

■ Plant kingdom: produces own food 

■ Fungi kingdom: absorbs food 

■ Animal Kingdom: ingests food  

CHAPTER TWO

CHEMICALS OF LIFE

● Carbon, Hydrogen, and Oxygen make up 96% of  life If you want to learn more check out lance ferris msu

● remaining 4%= Calcium, Phosphorous, Potassium, and Sulfur ● Trace elements those used in only tiny amounts

○ although only used in minute proportions, very important to life ○ deficiencies of any element has bad negative impact 

SUBATOMIC PARTICLES

● make up atoms

● Neutrons (0 charge, mass 1 Dalton), Electrons (­ charge, negligible mass), and  Protons (+ charge, mass 1 Dalton)  


What is a hydrophobic?



● Neutrons + protons makes up the nucleus, electrons form cloud around  nucleus

● atomic #: # of protons

● mass #: protons + neutrons

● atomic mass: approximated by mass # 

ISOTOPES:  two atoms of same element that differ in # of neutrons  ● radioactive isotopes: atom is not stable, so slowly decays

○ gives off particles and energy

○ half­life: time it takes for amount of element to decay to half of original amount, used as a tracer 

○ used to date fossils and in diagnosing medical disorders

VALENCE E­: # of e­ in outermost shell (valence shell)

● determines chemical behavior of atoms

● atoms with full valence shell are chemically INERT 

○ noble gasses 

BONDING ATOMS 

● covalent bond: two atoms share a pair of e­ in valence shell­ like marriage ○ only gas elements, makes a molecule 

○ single bond: atoms share one pair of e­ ( H­H)

○ double bond: atoms share two pairs of e­ (H=H)

● electronegativity: atoms ability to attract e­ in a covalent bond  ○ more electronegativity, greater ability to pull shared electrons towards its  nucleus  If you want to learn more check out art history exam 2

○ results in partial charges/ polarity, one side of molecule shows slightly more  +/­ charge

● ionic bonds: between metal and nonmetal, transfer of e­ from one atom to the  other­ like dating

○ cation: full + charge

○ anion: full ­ charge

● hydrogen bonds: H atom is bonded to electronegative atom (N,O,F), atom is  attracted to another electronegative atom because of difference in partial  charges

○ water

○ individually weak, but many H bonds makes for collective strength ● Van der Waals: molecules attracted to each other by partial charges due to  asymmetrical arrangement of atoms

○ attraction of e­ in one atom to nucleus of adjacent atom

● biological molecules react based on charge, if two molecules have similar  size/charge, they will act similar in the body 

● chemical reactions: making/breaking of chemical bonds We also discuss several other topics like todd allee umd

○ reactants: starting molecules

○ products: final molecules

CHAPTER THREE

WATER

● water is polar molecule: opposite ends have opposite partial charges ● water can form hydrogen bonds b/c of polarity

● 4 properties of water: 

○ cohesive 

■ hydrogen bonds hold molecules together

■ water can move against gravity in plants 

■ adhesion: attraction between water and other polar molecules ■ cohesion is emergent property: simple concept that has big biological effects ■ water has high surface tension: how hard it is to break surface of liquid,  ○ moderates temperature 

■ high specific heat: amount of heat needed to raise 1g by 1 degree Celsius ● for water, takes 1 calorie : heat needed to raise 1g of water by 1 degree Celsius ● 1 Joule: energy unit, 4.184 J= 1 calorie 

■ resists temperature change

■ ocean regulates temp of Earth

■ evaporative cooling: as liquid on surface of water evaporates, surface cools ● heat of vaporization: heat liquid must absorb for 1g to become a gas ○ expands when freezes 

■ H bonds have more order in ice, so it is less dense than water= ice floats ■ water is most dense at 4 ℃ Don't forget about the age old question of uwf pensacola

○ versatile as a solvent 

■ solution: liquid that is homogenous mix of substances

■ solvent: dissolving agent ( like water)

■ solute: substance that is being dissolved (like sugar)

■ aqueous solution: water is the solvent

■ ionic compounds surrounded by sphere of water molecules when dissolved =  hydration shell 

● due to charge attractions 

■ water can also dissolve non­ionic polar molecules (sugar)

■ large polar molecules (proteins) can dissolve if they have ionic/polar regions ● hydrophobic: water hating

○ oil molecules, non­polar bonds

● hydrophilic: water loving

● Colloid: stable suspension of fine particles in a liquid (jello?) MOLECULES

● molecular mass: sum of all masses of atoms in molecule

● 1 mole: 6.02 X 1023 molecules, relates molecules to real world measurement ○ 6.02 X 1023 Daltons= 1 gram

● molarity= # of moles of solute per L of solution 

ACID & BASIC CONDITIONS

● Hydrogen atoms can shift between water molecules, making: ○ hydronium ion: H30+, often written as H+ (chemically unstable)  ○ hydroxide ion: OH­ (chemically unstable) 

○ this process is constant and reversible

● acid: substance that increases H+ in solution

● base: reduces H+ in solution

● Changes in pH (acidic/ basic measurement)

○ in pure water, concentration of hydronium and hydroxide is = ○ adding acids/ bases changes OH­/H+ concentration

● pH scale

○ pH= ­log[H+]

■ in neutral solution, [H+]= 10­7=­(­7)=7

○ product of the concentrations of H+ and OH­ is constant in an aqueous  solution at 25 ℃ Don't forget about the age old question of diplocaulus habitat

■ [H+]X[OH­]=10­14 

○ acidic solutions: pH < 7 

○ basic solution: pH >7 

● Buffers: minimize changes of OH­ and H+ concentration

○ all cells must have neutral internal pH

CHAPTER 4

CARBON

● cells are 70­ 90% water, the rest is carbon based compounds  ● carbon can form large, complex, diverse compounds  Don't forget about the age old question of what is Composite pose?

○ tetravalence: Carbon has 4 valence e­

■ can form up to 4 bonds

■ tetrahedral shape with single bonds

● organic chemistry: study of carbon compounds, which also contain hydrogen ● Protein, DNA, carbohydrates made from carbon 

NAMING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

1) length 

● longest string of C atoms in a row

2) branches 

● for example, methyl group is a branch with one C surrounded by 3 H

=

H H H H

● when drawing molecules: one peak for every C  H­C­C­C­C­H

3) double bonds 

● “ene”= double bond ● “ane”= single bond

H H H H

● numbers show where the double bond is located in string of carbon atoms 4) rings 

● cyclohexane: “cyclo”= ring, “hex”= six carbon atoms, single bonded ● when drawing, double line represents double bond (benzene) HYDROCARBONS

● organic molecules with only C and H 

● Fats have hydrocarbon components ( ex. adipose cells store triglyceride) ● relatively non polar = hydrophobic 

● undergo reactions that release a lot of energy

ISOMERS: compounds with same molecular formula, but different structure  and properties

● structural isomers: different covalent arrangements of atoms ● geometric isomers: same covalent arrangements, differ in spatial arrangements ○ cis: same atoms on same side of central atoms

○ trans: same atoms on opposite, diagonal sides of central atoms ● enantiomers: mirror images of each other, like L and R hand (amino acids) ○ important in pharmaceuticals: two enantiomers have very different effects FUNCTIONAL GROUPS : parts of organic molecules most used in reactions

Functional Group

Parts

hydroxyl

­OH

carbonyl

>C=O

carboxyl

­COOH

amino

­NH2

sulfhydryl

­SH

phosphate

­OPO32­

methyl

­CH3

ATP

● adenosine triphosphate: primary energy transferring molecule ● like a battery

CHAPTER 5

MACROMOLECULES 

● large biological molecules

● carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids 

● polymer: long molecule made of many smaller molecules 

● monomers: the small molecule, building block 

● synthesis of polymers 

○ condensation reaction: connecting monomers to make polymers, also called  dehydration reaction, loss of one water molecules

○ enzymes: macromolecules that speed up dehydration reactions ● breakdown of polymers 

○ hydrolysis: reverse of dehydration, breakdown by adding a water molecule CARBOHYDRATES: sugars and polymers of sugars

● monosaccharides: monomer, a single sugar

○ multiples of CH2O­ each C has one O

○ glucose (C6H12O6) most common, it runs the brain

○ linear and ring forms(in aqueous solutions)

○ disaccharide: to monomers joined by dehydration reaction

○ glycosidic linkage: dehydration bond formed by two monosaccharides ● polysaccharides: more complex polymers

○ storage polysaccharides: 

■ starch: storage in plants

● surplus starch stored as granules in chloroplasts and other plastids ■ glycogen: storage in animals 

● stored in liver and muscle cells

○ cellulose: part of tough cell walls

■ polymer of glucose

■ alpha (helical/coiled) vs. beta (straight) glycosidic linkages

■ beta linkages allow for parallel cellulose molecules, grouped into micro fibrils  which is strong building material for plants

■ cellulose is indigestible in animals, passes through digestive tract 

● cows, termites, have symbiotic relationships with microbes that can digest  cellulose 

○ chitin: structural 

■ exoskeleton of arthropods

■ cell walls of fungi

LIPIDS: Class of large biological molecules, but not usually polymers ● hydrophobic, not soluble instantly

● fats, phospholipids, and steroids

● Fats 

○ used for energy storage

○ glycerol + 3 fatty acids connected by dehydration reaction= triglycerol ■ fatty acid: long carbon skeleton + H atoms + Carboxyl group  ● very in # of C and #/location of double bonds

○ saturated fatty acids: no double bonds, most possible # of H atoms ■ solid at room temp

■ animal fats

■ contribute to cardiovascular disease

○ unsaturated fatty acids: one or more double bonds

■ liquid at room temp, cis double bonds cause bending in C chain ■ plant fats

● Phospholipids 

○ hydrophobic tail + hydrophilic head

○ head: glycerol, phosphate, and choline

○ tail: fatty acid

○ phospholipid bilayer: compose cell membranes, two layers of phospholipids  with connecting tails

● Steroids: 

○ C skeleton of 4 fused rings

○ cholesterol: component of animal cell membrane

■ high levels in blood contribute to cardiovascular disease

PROTEINS

● 50% of dry mass in cell

● Types of proteins:  

○ enzymatic

■ end with “ase”

○ storage

○ hormonal

○ contractive & muscle 

○ defensive

○ transport

○ receptor

○ structural

■ collagen: glue for cells, holds animal cells together: extracellular

● polypeptide: many peptides, which are polymers built from selection of 20  amino acids

○ protein is one or more polypeptide

○ amino acids: differ in properties due to different side chains ■ amino group, carboxyl group, and variable R group surrounding central C atom ■ R group 

● nonpolar

○ made of C and H

○ hydrophobic

● polar

○ also have O and N

○ hydrophilic 

● full charge

○ acidic (O­)

○ basic (NH+)

● 4 levels of protein structure 

○ primary

■ order of amino acids

○ secondary

■ folds/coils of polypeptide chains attracted by H bonds

■ make alpha helix and beta pleated sheet 

○ tertiary

■ interactions among side chains

■ H bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals interaction, disulfide bridges (S­S between side chains)

■ hydrophilic/hydrophobic interactions

○ quaternary

■ when protein has multiple polypeptide chains, they stick together ■ ex. collagen and hemoglobin 

● Nucleic Acids: store/transmit hereditary info

○ nitrogenous base + 5 carbon sugar + phosphate group

○ monomer= nucleotide 

○ deoxyribose (has H on second C) and ribose/RNA (has OH on second C) ■ deoxyribose is more stable

○ nitrogenous bases of DNA= adenine, thymine, guanine, cytosine ■ RNA has uracil instead of thymine

○ nitrogenous bases match up to form double helix 

CHAPTER SIX

THE CELL

● fundamental units of like 

● membrane 

○ phospholipid fabric, plus cholesterol and protein 

○ cell boundary, and enclose organelles

● plant cells have cell wall, chloroplast, and central vacuole that distinguish  them from animal cells

SEEING THE CELL

● Light microscopes

○ compound and dissecting 

○ use glass lenses

● Electron microscopes

○ higher magnification and resolution than light microscopes ○ scanning electron microscope (SEM): 3D images, beams e­ onto surface ○ transmission electron microscope (TEM): beam e­ through surface, used to  study internal structure of cells

● Cell Fractionation 

○ separates cells into major organelles

○ blend cells­spin in centrifuge­ pallet of specific organelles forms depending on  speed and duration of centrifuge

○ allows study of organelle function

○ correlates cell structure and function using biochemistry and cytology PARTS OF THE CELL

● Plasma Membrane: baggie that contains everything else

○ selective barrier

■ allows passage of oxygen, nutrients, and waste

■ fluid, can move

■ holds proteins and carbohydrates

● location, type, and # of glycoproteins distinguish cells from each other ● Cytosol: semifluid in interior of cell

● Nucleus 

○ like library of cell

○ contains most DNA

■ mitochondria have their own DNA

○ nuclear envelope: encloses nucleus from cytoplasm

■ double layer membranes

○ nuclear pores: holes through double membrane 

■ regulate entry/exit of molecules

○ nuclear lamina: skeletal structure of nucleus, region of protein between each  layer of double membrane

○ chromatin: DNA + proteins inside nucleus

○ chromosomes: condensed chromatin

○ nucleolus: center of nucleus, site of rRNA synthesis

● Ribosomes

○ made of rRNA and protein

○ in charge of protein synthesis 

○ free ribosomes: floating in cytosol

○ bound ribosomes: anchored to endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear envelope ● Endomembrane System­ controls protein traffic and metabolic functions ○ includes:

■ nuclear envelope

■ endoplasmic reticulum 

● makes up more than ½ of total membrane in eukaryotic cells ● continuous w/ nuclear envelope

● two regions

○ smooth ER: no ribosomes

■ synthesize lipids 

■ metabolize carbohydrates 

■ detoxifies poison 

■ stores calcium 

○ rough ER: ribosomes

■ secretes glycoproteins (protein + carbohydrate)

■ distributes transport vesicles

■ Golgi apparatus  

● warehouse/ shipping center 

● made of cisternae: flattened membranous sacs

● modifies product of ER

● manufactures molecules

● sorts proteins

● cis face: receiving, facing ER

● trans face: shipping, away from ER

■ lysosomes 

■ vacuoles 

■ plasma membrane

○ all components are continuous or connected by transfer vesicles ● Mitochondria/Chloroplasts 

○ enclosed by double membranes

○ contain their own DNA

■ thought to once have been separate living organisms, consumed by larger cells  to perform function= endosymbiont theory 

○ mitochondria: 

■ make ATP in all eukaryotic cells

■ have smooth outer membranes

■ Cristae: folded inner membrane

● increases surface area for enzymes to make ATP

■ intermembrane space: space between two membranes

■ mitochondrial matrix:  inside cristae, where work is done

■ cellular respiration

○ chloroplasts 

■ capture light energy: photosynthesis

■ thylakoids: membranous sacs that are stacked inside chloroplasts to form  granum 

■ stroma: internal fluid

■ chloroplast is part of the plastid family

■ contain chlorophyll: green pigment

● lysosomes 

○ membranous sacs of hydrolytic enzymes

■ digest proteins, fats, polysaccharide, and nucleic acids using hydrolysis ○ fuses with food vacuoles to digest molecules

○ recycles parts of cells: autophagy 

● peroxisomes 

○ specialized metabolic compartment: only single membrane ○ makes hydrogen peroxide and converts to water

■ uses oxygen to blow up molecules using oxidation 

● vacuoles: 

○ warehouses of plant and fungal cells

○ food vacuoles: used for holding engulfed macromolecules in phagocytosis ○ contractile vacuoles: pump excess water out of plant cells ○ central vacuole: holds cell sap (organic compounds + water)  ● Cytoskeleton 

○ microtubules: thickest (24 nm)

■ hollow tubes of tubulin

■ functions 

● maintain cell shape

● cell motility

● chromosome movement in cell division

● organelle movement­ like railroads

● control locomotor appendages

○ flagella: swimming (sperm)

○ cilia: beating (oviducts)

○ basal body: anchors flagella/cilia to cell

○ dynein: motor protein that moves flagella/cilia

■ grab, move, and release outer microtubules

■ protein links on microtubule sheaths prevent sliding during movement ■ centrosomes: microtubules grow out of them 

● near the nucleus 

● organizes microtubules, like railway station

● centrioles: pair of them make up centrosome in animal cells ○ 9 triplets of microtubules arranged in star shape

○ placed at right angles to each other

○ microfilaments: thinnest (7 nm)

■ made of two intertwined actin strands

■ resists pulling forces like a rope

■ functions 

● maintain cell shape

● change cell shape

● muscle contraction

○ myosin: protein that works with actin for contraction

● cytoplasmic streaming

● cell motility

● cell division

■ forms 3­D network inside cells to support shape like steel reinforced cement:  cortex 

○ intermediate filaments: middle, 8­12 nm

■ made of keratin

■ functions 

● maintain cell shape

● anchors nucleus and organelles

● formation of nuclear lamina

● extracellular components: synthesized by cells and secreted out membrane ○ cell walls: 

■ plant cells

● prokaryotes, fungi, and some protists

■ protects, maintain shape, and prevents excessive water uptake ■ made of cellulose embedded in polysaccharides and fiber

■ multiple layers 

● primary cell wall 

○ thin and flexible wall of young plants

● middle lamina 

○ in between primary cell wall and secondary cell wall

● secondary cell wall 

○ between plasma membrane and primary cell wall, tougher than primary ■ plasmodesmata: channels between adjacent plant  cells 

○ extracellular matrix: animal cells

■ functions 

● support

● adhesion

● movement

● regulation

■ made of glycoproteins: collagen, proteoglycans (core protein + carbohydrates),  and fibronectin

● bind to receptor proteins on membrane: integrins 

INTERCELLULAR JUNCTIONS

● Plant Cells

○ plasmodesmata

■ allows passage of water and small solutes

● Animal Cells

○ tight junction: membranes pushed together 

○ desmosomes: velcro, anchoring junction

○ gap junctions:  communicating, cytoplasmic channels between cells

CHAPTER 7

CELL MEMBRANE

● phospholipids most abundant component

○ amphipathic: have both hydrophilic/ hydrophobic regions

○ creates stable boundary between two aqueous compartments ● fluid mosaic model: plasma membrane is fluid, and has mosaic of proteins  embedded in it

○ proteins are not random (can be grouped)

○ lipids/ proteins drift laterally 

○ lipids may also flip transversely across membrane

● membrane solidifies at cold temperatures 

○ temp at which it solidifies depends of type of lipids

■ saturated lipids are less fluid than unsaturated, solidify faster ○ cholesterol acts as temperature buffer

■ restrains movement at warm temperatures

■ maintains fluidity at cold temperatures

● prevents tight packing of lipids

MEMBRANE PROTEINS

● determine functions of membrane

● peripheral proteins: bound to surface of membrane

● integral proteins: penetrate hydrophobic interior of membrane ○ transmembrane proteins: cross through entire membrane

■ hydrophobic regions of protein contain non polar amino acids coiled into alpha  helices

● 6 functions 

○ transport

○ enzymatic activity

○ signal transduction

○ cell/cell recognition

○ intercellular joining

○ attachment to cytoskeleton and ECM

MEMBRANE CARBOHYDRATES

● used for cell recognition

● bind to lipids (glycolipids) or proteins (glycoproteins)

● vary between species, individuals, and cell types within individual MEMBRANE SIDEDNESS

● inside and outside of membranes are different

● asymmetrical placement of proteins, lipids, and carbs determined as ER and  Golgi apparatus build them 

PASSAGE THROUGH MEMBRANE

● permeability 

○ hydrophobic molecules pass quickly through membrane, can dissolve with  interior 

○ hydrophilic molecules are hard to pass through

● diffusion: molecules spread out evenly into available space

○ each molecule moves randomly, but diffusion may be directional ○ dynamic equilibrium: no net movement, the same # of molecules cross in each  direction

○ molecules diffuse down concentration gradient: high concentration to low  concentration

○ passive transport: diffusion down concentration gradient

■ no energy needed 

■ transport proteins: allow passage of hydrophilic molecules, specific to  substance they move

● channel proteins: hydrophilic channel that acts as a tunnel ○ aquaporins: channel proteins that allow passage of water

● carrier proteins: bind to molecules and change shape to carry them across  membrane

○ facilitated diffusion: transport proteins speed passive movement of molecules ■ down concentration gradient 

■ no energy

● ion channels: diffusion of ions

○ gated channels: type of ion channels, open and close in response to stimulus ○ active transport: against concentration gradient

■ requires energy 

■ allows cells to maintain concentrations that differ from surroundings ■ sodium potassium pump: active transport protein

● Osmosis: diffusion or water across membrane from low SOLUTE concentration  to high SOLUTE concentration

○ until solute concentration is even

● membrane potential: voltage difference across membrane 

○ electrochemical gradient: drives ion diffusion, membrane potential and  concentration gradient 

○ electrogenic pump: generates voltage across membrane when transporting  proteins

■ sodium potassium pump

○ proton pump: electrogenic pump in plants, fungi, and bacteria ● Cotransport: active transport of solute indirectly drives transport of other  molecules

○ plants use proton pumps, which uses hydrogen ions, to drive active transport  of nutrients into cell

● bulk transport: large molecules like polysaccharides and proteins cross  membranes in bulk via vesicles: requires energy 

○ exocytosis: transport vesicles fuse with membrane and release molecules  outside cell

○ endocytosis: cell takes in macromolecules by forming vesicles with plasma  membrane

■ phagocytosis: eating

● cell membrane extends to engulf particle in vesicle

● vesicle fuses with lysosome to digest particle

■ pinocytosis: drinking

● dissolved molecules in droplets are engulfed with in folding of plasma  membrane, also takes up extracellular fluid

■ receptor mediated endocytosis: binding of ligands to receptors triggers vesicle  formation

● ligands: molecule that specifically binds to receptor site on other molecules ● most like pinocytosis

WATER BALANCE IN CELLS

● No cell walls

○ tonicity: ability of solution to make cells gain or lose water ■ isotonic: no net water movement, solute concentration is the same inside and  outside

■ hypertonic: solute concentration greater (HYPER=MORE) outside cell ● cell loses water

■ hypotonic: solute concentration smaller (HYPO= less) outside cell ● cell gains water, (gets fat like a Hippo=hypo)

○ osmoregulation : control of solute concentration and water balance in cells ■ hyper/hypotonic solutions cause problems

■ contractile vacuoles: water pumps

● With Cell Walls

○ turgid: when cell is firm

■ cell walls push against bloated cell and restrict further water uptake ■ hypotonic solution

○ flaccid: when cell is limp

■ surroundings are isotonic

■ no net movement of water

○ plasmolysis: cells lose water, membrane and cell walls separate ■ hypertonic solution

■ plant wilts and dies

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here