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BYU-I - Sci 210 - Class Notes - Week 6

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BYU-I - Sci 210 - Class Notes - Week 6

School: Brigham Young University - Idaho
Department: Science
Course: Neanderthals/Other Successes
Professor: John Griffith
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Science
Name: FDSCI 210
Description: These notes cover the debate about science and truth from religious standpoints.
Uploaded: 02/16/2016
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background image Science and Truth Study Questions 1. What has the Lord promised to reveal to us in our day and in the millennium? In our day and in the millennium, the Lord will reveal to us knowledge,  both spiritual and temporal, which has not been revealed “since the world 
began until now” (D&C 121: 26).  We are also promised that we will learn how
the creation occurred. 
2. If you could graph human society’s knowledge and understanding of the  world around us and our ability to make and use tools over the past 2000 
years, what would that graph look like?
There would be a gradual increase over the years, with a plateau and  even a small drop during the Dark Ages, until there is a sudden sharp incline 
representing the age of technology. It differs according to cultures as well, but
that is the general trend of the world.  
3. What message is Brigham Young trying to convey in the quotes at the bottom of page 2?
Brigham Young was saying that there are a lot of facts in the world which are 
proved scientifically, yet differ from a teaching given by religious leaders.  A 
common disagreement is the belief that the earth is flat, which has been 
disproved by science.  When there are a lot of contradictions such as this one, 
then people begin to lose faith and instead adopt the view that if they can see it 
and if they can feel it, then it’s real.  This is a dangerous frame of mind for 
religions and Young is noticing that there are many who no longer believe in 
religion because of the truths discovered by science which contradicts doctrinal 
teachings which were given before.
4. Describe the source of conflict between science and religion. There is a large conflict regarding truth.  Some religions will pronounce  certain things as true but science will prove it false.  Or religion may say 
something is false which science proves to be true.  
5. Differentiate between Rationalism and Empiricism and how can they work  together?
Rationalism is the concept that man can understand the universe by pure 
reasoning.  It is the ability to be able to come to conclusions and apply learning 
to a future scenario.  For example, if I were to drop a pen 10 times and see it fall 
to the ground every time, I would rationalize that the pen will continue to fall, no 
matter how many times I dropped it.  Empiricism is the concept that we learn 
only through observations made by the senses.  It is the “if I see it and feel it, 
then I will believe it” mindset.  In this mode of thinking, if a man drops a pen 10 
times and sees it fall every time, then he will conclude that the pen has dropped 
every time I let it go, but I cannot say that it will continue dropping.  It could go 
background image up one of these times and so I can only conclude that for the amount of time 
that I dropped the pen, it has fallen.
6. What is a hypothesis? A hypothesis is a working theory.  The duty of a hypothesis is to guide a  scientists/researcher towards a specific goal.  A hypothesis is formed when there 
is a question to be answered through research and when there is a possible 
answer to that question.  For example, if the question is 
What will happen if the  pen is dropped from five feet in the air?  And the possible answer (or theorized  result) is  the pen will fall , then this could be the hypothesis which guides the  experiment: If the pen is dropped from five feet, then it will fall every time 
because of the pull of gravity.
7. What is the connection between predictions and hypotheses? A hypothesis includes a prediction.  If a hypothesis makes no predictions then it isn’t testable and doesn’t promote new knowledge.  A prediction is simply an 
observation that we should see if the hypothesis is correct.  Basically, the 
connection between a prediction and a hypothesis is that the prediction is the 
starting point of the hypothesis.  
8. What is the difference between experimental and historical science?  Experimental science is the act of having a controlled environment or  controlled substances with the intent of isolating an influencing factor and 
proving a hypothesis.  There is physics, chemistry, and some subspecialties of 
biology and geology which fall under this category.  For historical sciences, there 
is no control.  It is about the observational sciences such as astronomy and 
paleontology. 
9. What is a theory and what functions do theories serve? A theory is an educated “guess” which has here main functions. Theories  explain why we see observations, it describes nature.  It provides conceptual 
economy; it relates a number of otherwise unconnected observations and makes
them easier to remember.  Theories also guide future research by providing 
predictions.
10.What is an assumption and what are the five assumptions made in modern  science?
An assumption is a concept that cannot be proven but serves as the 
foundation upon which the rest of the system is built.  The five modern 
assumptions which underlay today’s science is that 1) man can understand the 
universe, 2) theories should be quantitative, testable, and fit observations, 3) 
simple laws are better, 4) uniformitarianism (the presumption that theories and 
laws that we discover through science apply throughout space and time), and 5) 
mechanism/naturalism (the presumption that every observation is produced by a
describable mechanism).

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School: Brigham Young University - Idaho
Department: Science
Course: Neanderthals/Other Successes
Professor: John Griffith
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Science
Name: FDSCI 210
Description: These notes cover the debate about science and truth from religious standpoints.
Uploaded: 02/16/2016
3 Pages 15 Views 12 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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