×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

UM - BIL 160 - Bil 160 chapter 25 cont'd and complete ch 26 - Class

Created by: Khrystel Bernard Elite Notetaker

Schools > University of Miami > Biology > MB 160 > UM - BIL 160 - Bil 160 chapter 25 cont'd and complete ch 26 - Class

UM - BIL 160 - Bil 160 chapter 25 cont'd and complete ch 26 - Class

School: University of Miami
Department: Biology
Course: Evolution & Biodivrsity
Professor: Dana Krempels
Term: Spring 2015
Tags: Biology
Name: Bil 160 chapter 25 cont'd and complete ch 26
Description: These notes cover material that will most likely be on the exam.
Uploaded: 02/26/2016
0 5 3 30 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 2 of a 5 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Chapter 25 cont’d and complete Chapter 26 note MASS EXTINCTIONS: 1. 443 million years ago (Mya):  Most of the species lived in the ocean, however during an  ice age the sea levels dropped and the ocean chemistry changed, causing an extreme 
decline in marine populations.
2. 359 Mya the ocean began to lack enough oxygen to sustain life (reasons are unknown) 3. 248 Mya 96% of all species went extinct (reason aren’t known)
4. 200 Mya, Hypotheses range from massive volcanic activity, to asteroids impacting Earth,
and extreme climate change. 5. 65 Mya, volcanic eruptions caused massive clouds or carbon dioxide to cover the sky and prevented the Sun’s light from reaching the ground.  Thus caused dramatic drop in 
temperatures.  Furthermore, an asteroid impacted the Yucatan Peninsula; these factors 
killed many species, including the dinosaurs.
6. A “6 th  extinction” may be occurring now due to human activity  I. Pollution II.  Introducing invasive species to established ecosystems (Example: African rock 
python hybrid in the Everglades)
III.  Overkilling [example: hunting elephants for their tusks and overfishing] IV. Genetically altering crops/animals to cause a lack of diversity  Example of “lack of genetic diversity”:  Humans interbreed corn until all 
corn crops lack variety in their genetic makeup.  If one corn is susceptible 
to a disease or climatic change, all members of that species will die 
because ALL have the same genetic makeup, which provides no defense 
against the disease or climate).
Fun Fact: Mass extinction is when about 75% of the living population dies within a 2­
million­year period
Before these events, and before multicellular and aerobic organisms existed, the Earth was very 
inhospitable and was unable to sustain much life. 
Hypotheses of where organic molecules that makeup life come from 1. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules spontaneously produced macromolecules  (carbohydrates, lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins) 2. Organic molecules rained down from outer space 3. Were synthesized near hydrothermal vents or alkaline vents in the ocean
4. Synthesized when asteroids and comets impacted Earth and brought them here
background image In order to produce life Earth needed some essential elements SPONCH (sulfur, 
phosphorous, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, hydrogen)…carbon dioxide (CO2) dominated the
atmosphere, which enabled early prokaryotes to perform photosynthesis   
As Earth began to gain an atmosphere, many anaerobic organisms started to die out 
(oxygen is toxic poison to them)
Photosynthesis from early prokaryotes caused a net gain of oxygen (before O2 
built up in the atmosphere it oxidized reduced ions in the ocean (Example: 
oxidizing iron (Fe) 2+ which caused the “Banded Iron Formations” in seawater) 
FOSSIL RECORDS Evidence: Fossils accumulate in sedimentary rocks (the oldest fossils in the bottom and the 
newest are packed closer to the surface)
Specific years are predicted using radiometric dating (dating based on decay of its
radioactive isotopes of elements that were amassed when the organism was alive, 
such as carbon)
Rate of decay is the half­life (not affected by environmental variables) Age determine by measuring the ratio between carbon­14 and carbon­₆ Radioactive isotopes with longer half­lives are needed to date older fossils (because traces of carbon­14 dwindles over time) Limitations:  Older organisms are harder to trace because carbon dwindles over time, and 
elements with longer half­lives are not used by animals, such as uranium so it obviously cannot 
be used to measure the age of these older fossils.
Origin of Eukaryotes Timing:  Oldest fossils are 1.8 billion years old Unlike prokaryotes, eukaryotes have very developed cytoskeletons which enable 
them to engulf other cells­­­It has been suggested that mitochondria and plasmids 
(chloroplasts) originated from small prokaryotes which were engulfed by other 
larger cells (endosymbiont theory)
Evidence: The inner membranes of mitochondria and plasmids contain enzymes and 
transport systems similar to that of the plasma membranes of living prokaryotes
Origin of Multicellularity:  Oldest form of multicellular eukaryote is the red algae (1.2 billion years ago) Ediacaran biota – larger fossils that appeared 600­535 million years ago (Earth was 
inhabited only by microbial organisms until this)
These organisms began to diversify and evolve Adaptive Radiation: An event that causes is lineage to rapidly diversify The new lineages evolve different adaptations

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Miami who use StudySoup to get ahead
5 Pages 66 Views 52 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Miami who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Miami
Department: Biology
Course: Evolution & Biodivrsity
Professor: Dana Krempels
Term: Spring 2015
Tags: Biology
Name: Bil 160 chapter 25 cont'd and complete ch 26
Description: These notes cover material that will most likely be on the exam.
Uploaded: 02/26/2016
5 Pages 66 Views 52 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UM - MB 160 - Class Notes - Week 2
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here