Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

Mason - ECON 104 - Study guide for Macroeconomics exam 5 - Study Guide

Created by: Morgan Owens Elite Notetaker

> > > > Mason - ECON 104 - Study guide for Macroeconomics exam 5 - Study Guide

Mason - ECON 104 - Study guide for Macroeconomics exam 5 - Study Guide

School: George Mason University
Department: Economics
Course: Macroeconomics
Professor: Stephen Gillepsie
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: Macroeconomics and Gillespie
Name: Study guide for Macroeconomics exam 5
Description: Here is a study guide for exam 5!!
Uploaded: 04/19/2016
This preview shows pages 1 - 6 of a 32 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Exam 5 study guide: Making a household budget: 2 general approaches: 1. Estimate your likely income ­ Then divide it up 2. Estimate your necessary expenses ­ see if your income is large enough
background image Both approaches involve balancing income and expenditures Some expenditures are unavoidable, they must be made: 1. Payments promised for prior spending ­ This can be the biggest part of many households' budgets, ex: monthly payments on a loan 2. Expenses necessary to maintain life: ex: food, clothing, medical care, housing, transportation Spending other than these "unavoidable" is your discretionary spending Note: unavoidable spending generally isn't unavoidable, but is costly to change Making the Federal budget: 1 . The President develops a proposed budget ­ Usually in February ­ assisted by staff, OMB, Treasury, Council of Economic Advisors, various govt. agencies 2. The Congress modifies the proposed budget a. Starts in the House ­ Appropriations considers spending, ways and Means considers taxes b. Senate reviews what the House passes c. Differences go to a conference committee d. Both Houses then vote on reconciled bills 3. President signs or vetoes each bill in its entirety
background image ­ if the president vetoes a bill it goes back to congress, where it either is modified or they 
override the Veto (line­item veto violates the constitution)
4. Federal agencies actually spend money and collect taxes ­ must either have an approved budges or a continuing resolution in order to operate.  Differences between your budget and the Federal budget
1. Only a few people are involved in your budget: yourself, your spouse, perhaps your parents, 
perhaps important creditors
Federal Budget: A huge number of people are involved, congress, president  2. You can make (or change) your budget quickly VS. Federal govt. budget takes all year    3. Your budget is fairly small (in the tens of thousands of $) VS. Federal budget is gargantuan 
($3.6 trillion in 2014)
4. Your budget is pretty informal VS. Federal budget is massively documented Similarities between your budget and the Federal budget
1. Both must balance income and expenditures, they both can go into debt. 
2. Both have a large "unavoidable" component, obligations to make payments. 3. Both cause headaches, fights, tension, and hard feelings Understand deficit and debt:
Budget deficit­ The Federal government runs a deficit any year that it spends more than it 
collects in taxes, and a surplus any year that it spends less than it collects in taxes
­ For most of our lives the government has run a deficit, not a surplus ­ Until 1998 we hadn't had a budget surplus since 1969, and we sure don't have one now Government debt differs from household debt in 3 important ways:
background image 1. Household debt must someday be repaid, government debts can be rolled over forever.  2. Household debt is almost exclusively owed to persons outside the household, government is almost exclusively owed to ourselves.  3. Federal debt can be monetized, govt. can reduce real value of debt by causing inflation,  and household doesn’t have this option.  It's useful to compare the Federal government to a single household ­ If you spend just what you earn, your budget is balanced ­ If you spend more than you earn, you run a deficit ­ How can you spend more than you earn? By borrowing The Federal government also borrows to let it spend more than it has ­ The Treasury issues bills, notes, bonds ­ People buy them (that is, they loan the government money) Impact of deficit on aggregate demand­ The bigger the deficit, the larger the net increase in 
aggregate demand
* Because disposable income (and consumption) are reduced by taxes
a larger Federal budget deficit means a greater increase in AD, there are 2 ways the deficit can 
get larger:
1. Higher government spending will increase the size of the deficit 2. Lower tax receipts will increase the size of the deficit.  However, aggregate demand is unlikely to rise by the size of the deficit More significant impact is called Crowding Out: More government borrowing funds to cover the 
deficit by selling securities which raises the interest rate which decreases private investment. 
Effects foreign trade in 2 ways:
background image b. High value of dollar­High real interest rate increases foreign demand for dollars, this raises 
price of dollar in terms of foreign currencies, this raises price of our exports, and this decreases 
our net exports
c. Ricardian equivalence­ Consumers realize that bigger budget deficit now means higher taxes 
later, so they decrease consumption now in anticipation of higher taxes later.
Difference between deficit and debt­Deficit happens over a period of one year, Debt is the 
accumulated deficits over time
High employment deficit: how large the deficit would be if the economy were at the level of 
the potential GDP. 
­ the federal budget will vary along with the business cycle ­ deficits will grow during recessions,  ­ Deficits will shrink during expansions.  This happens because of the activity of automatic stabilizers, most importantly are the Federal income tax and State unemployment insurance programs.  ­ Household tax liabilities  fall along with income ­ Unemployment insurance automatically fall along with income.  To make it easier to compare the deficit from one time period to the next, we can adjust for the 
effect of automatic ­ result is the high employment deficit. 
­ The “high employment” deficit is what the Federal deficit would be if the economy were 
operating at the level of potential GDP. 
*when the high employment deficits is small = the current budget imbalance is temporary.  *when the high employment deficit is large = fundamental imbalance between govt. spending 
and tax receipts. (Will not go away on its own)
 
background image Investment or consumption? There are wise reasons for going into debt, and there are foolish reasons ­ a student loan generally is wise debt ­ you are investing in your future ­ the debt can be repaid out of increased future earnings ­ maxing out numerous credit cards to live beyond your means is generally foolish debt ­ repayment means that you will be poorer in the future The same thing is true for the government ­ it is wise to run a deficit in wartime ­ it is wise to borrow to pay for improvements in infrastructure ­ improved transportation and communications networks are an investment that helps the 
economy to grow
­ investment in medical research, in basic scientific research can lead to increases in productivity ­ we can pay back the debt from the increased income generated by a growing economy ­ it is foolish to run a deficit to support current consumption ­ if the borrowing isn't for something that will expand our production possibilities in the future, 
then its repayment will make our children poorer
Controlling the budget: Congress and the President struggled mightily over the past 30 years to
get the Federal budget under control
­ Gramm­Rudman Act required across­the­board cuts in the budgets of Federal agencies

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at George Mason University who use StudySoup to get ahead
32 Pages 58 Views 46 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at George Mason University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: George Mason University
Department: Economics
Course: Macroeconomics
Professor: Stephen Gillepsie
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: Macroeconomics and Gillespie
Name: Study guide for Macroeconomics exam 5
Description: Here is a study guide for exam 5!!
Uploaded: 04/19/2016
32 Pages 58 Views 46 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Mason - ECON 104 - Study Guide
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Mason - ECON 104 - Study Guide

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here