Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

CSU - BC 103 - Class Notes - Life103-Week 12 and 13 Notes

Created by: Addy Carroll Elite Notetaker

> > > > CSU - BC 103 - Class Notes - Life103-Week 12 and 13 Notes

CSU - BC 103 - Class Notes - Life103-Week 12 and 13 Notes

School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life103-Week 12 and 13 Notes
Description: These notes cover circulation, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and excretion.
Uploaded: 04/24/2016
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 9 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Life 103 Notes  *Adapted from the lecture slides of Dr. Tanya Dewey*  Circulation  •  All animals must obtain nutrients and oxygen, excrete wastes, and  move  •  Animals live in nearly every conceivable kind of environment (temperature,  pressure, salinity, oxygen concentrations, light levels, currents, selective 
pressures, etc.) 
-Exchange with the environment is ultimately at the cellular level-
substances in solution travel across the plasma membrane of cells 
•  Surface area to volume ratios  -As volume increases, surface area to volume ratio decreases 
-Unicellular and cells in simple, multicellular organisms can exchange 
directly with the environment 
-Cells of larger, complex organisms cannot exchange directly with the 
environment 
 
~It’s less efficient to directly exchange between the body and the         environment across the surface, in this case    ~So other surface areas are created for exchange-              internal/protected huge surface areas  •  3 components of a circulatory system  -Circulatory fluid: carries nutrients and (possibly) oxygen and wastes 
-A system of vessels: for fluid transport 
-A pump (heart): uses metabolic energy to generate pressure to move 
fluids 
•  Closed vs. Open Circulatory Systems  -Open circulatory systems: the system of vessels is open/not continuous; 
Hemolymph is the fluid that all cells are in contact with for exchange; 
pressure changes and body movements and valves move fluid back into 
the heart (see textbook figure 42.3a) 
 
~Found in arthropods, many molluscs, many phyla  -Closed circulatory systems: the system of vessels is closed/continuous; 
the circulatory fluid is blood and is distinct from interstitial fluids; heart(s) 
pump blood through vessels, exchange is between blood and interstitial 
fluids and interstitial fluids and cells (see textbook figure 42.3b) 
-Closed circulatory systems are more metabolically costly; higher pressure 
means more effective delivery of oxygen to tissues 
 
~Animals that require more energy usually have closed circulatory        systems  -Open circulatory systems are metabolically cheaper and have lower 
pressure 
 
~Animals that require less energy usually have open circulatory         systems  •  Closed Circulatory Systems  -Arteries: carry blood away from the heart 
background image -Capillaries: capillary beds infiltrate tissues with thin, porous walled 
vessels; this is the site of exchange with tissues, including gases (O
2  and  CO 2 ) and chemicals (nutrients and waste products)  -Veins: carry blood to the heart   •  Single Circulatory System (see textbook figure 42.4a)  -Found in ray-finned fishes and sharks and rays 
-Single pump 
 
~Single atrium: receives blood into the heart    ~Single ventricle: pumps blood out of the heart  -Oxygenation of blood in the gills  •  Double Circulatory System  -In frogs and most reptiles (see textbook figure 42.4b) 
 
~Two atria: receives blood into the heart    ~Single ventricle: pumps blood out of the hears      -Because there’s only one ventricle with two atria, there’s        often mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood, which        results in a loss of efficiency    ~Still a single heart=pump    ~Oxygenation of blood in pulmocutaneous circuit (lungs and           skin/gills)  -In mammals and birds-need more efficient systems because they have 
higher metabolic rates (see textbook figure 42.4c) 
 
~Two atria: receive blood into the heart    ~Two ventricles: push blood out of the heart    ~Oxygenation of blood in the lungs (pulmonary circuit)  •  Oxygenation  -Blood carries oxygen via special reversible, oxygen-binding molecules 
(proteins) 
 
~Needs to be reversible because it would do no good if the oxygen        just stayed bonded to the protein and never was released to the        tissues  -Hemoglobin (vertebrates)-iron, incorporated into red blood cells 
 
~Picks up 4 O 2  molecules in high O 2 , high pH environments    ~Releases O in deoxygenated, low pH tissues via diffusion    ~As the O 2  concentration on the hemoglobin increases, the            saturation of the molecule increases      -This relationship eventually hits a plateau because           hemoglobin can only carry 4 O 2  molecules, so at that point        it’s completely saturated  -Hemocyanin (crustaceans, some molluscs)-copper, suspended in blood  •  O 2  and CO in the circulatory system  -Hemoglobin has higher saturation in areas with lower CO and lower  saturation in areas with higher CO 2     ~Hemoglobin loses affinity for oxygen in high CO 2  environments, so      that’s why it can release the O molecules 
background image   ~The capillaries have higher CO 2 , so that’s why that’s the site of         exchange of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood, when the O 2          goes to the rest of the body  •  Fluid flow through the circulatory system  -The heart generates force 
-The atria collect blood from the lungs and the body 
-The ventricles force blood into the circuits 
-The arteries have a thick layer of smooth muscle and connective tissue to 
accommodate the pressure generated in the heart; they get smaller and 
smaller the farther away the are from the heart  
-The capillaries are very thin-walled in order to promote diffusion; smaller 
than arteries and veins 
-The veins have to bring the blood back to the heart without accumulating 
much pressure; this is accomplished by the valves which prevent pressure 
from building up too much; get bigger as they get closer to the heart (see 
textbook figure 42.9) 
-As the blood vessels have smaller volume the farther away they get from 
the heart, the surface area increases 
 
~In other words, the surface area is the greatest at the capillaries      and lowest closer to the heart at the arteries and veins  -Velocity is greatest just after leaving the heart through the arteries, is the 
lowest at the capillaries, and then regains some velocity on the way back 
to the heart through the veins 
-Blood pressure is the highest just after leaving the heart through the 
arteries and continues to decrease throughout the rest of the circuit and is 
never regained (see textbook figure 42.10) 
-Opposing forces: blood pressure and osmotic pressure (see textbook 
figure 42.14) 
 
~Osmotic pressure is exerted at the capillaries, while blood            pressure is exerted out of the capillaries    ~Osmotic pressure stays the same throughout the capillaries, but         blood pressure starts off much higher than osmotic pressure and         proceeds to decrease throughout      -Therefore, there is a net loss of fluid from capillary beds  -Lymph: responsible for collecting the fluid the body lost to the tissues and 
bring it back to the core of the body and eventually the heart 
 
Gas Exchange 
•  Respiratory exchange surfaces- responsible for getting oxygen into the  body and removing carbon dioxide from it; must be moist because gases 
cannot cross membranes except in aqueous solutions 
-Aquatic animals-moist membranes are not a challenge because they are 
already in water anyway; respiration done by gills (and other mechanisms) 
-Cutaneous respiration- respiration across the skin 
-Terrestrial animals-moist membranes are a challenge; respiration done 
through exchange across moist skin and the use of lungs (internal to the 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
9 Pages 20 Views 16 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Colorado State University
Department: Biology
Course: Biology of Organisms-Animals and Plants
Professor: Jennifer Dewey
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Biology
Name: Life103-Week 12 and 13 Notes
Description: These notes cover circulation, gas exchange, osmoregulation, and excretion.
Uploaded: 04/24/2016
9 Pages 20 Views 16 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 103 - Class Notes - Week 13
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CSU - LIFE 103 - Class Notes - Week 13

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here