×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

NYU - PSY 25 - Class Notes - Week 8

Created by: Brianna René Elite Notetaker

Schools > New York University > Psychology > PSY 25 > NYU - PSY 25 - Class Notes - Week 8

NYU - PSY 25 - Class Notes - Week 8

School: New York University
Department: Psychology
Course: Cognitive Neuroscience
Professor: Clay Curtis
Term: Winter 2016
Tags: Psychology, cognitive, neuroscience, neurobiology, and perception
Name: Language + Recitation Articles
Description: Entire language module + 2 recitation articles: McClure & DeLong (2005)
Uploaded: 05/04/2016
0 5 3 44 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 8 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image 3.5. Language     Anomia: The inability to find the words to label things in the world.  Patient H.M’s was able to  speak, read and understand language. His only problem was not being able to name things, 
nouns being the worst. 
    People with anomia are aware of their deficit and they use correct grammatical 
structures as well as pantomiming to get their point across.  
  Tip-of-the-Tongue Phenomenon: Object knowledge is NOT the same as its label. 
That's why when someone says different names you know which ones definitely aren't 
the one you are looking for.  
  In the same way, the ability to produce speech is NOT the same as the ability to 
understand language.
 (The the two pathways run in opposite directions of each other) 
 
Dysarthria: 
Difficulty controlling muscles used in speech
  Apraxia: Impairment of motor PLANNING and speech articulation. (Ataxia is the inability to 
initiate muscle movements towards what is being looked at)
  Aphasia: Deficit in language production or comprehension.     Left Peri-Sylvian Language Area =  Broca’s Area (Inferior Frontal Gyrus) + Wernicke’s Area  (Superior Temporal Gyrus)     A left hemisphere network involving the frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes is especially  critical for language production and comprehension.     Broca’s Aphasia (Anterior Aphasia)A disorder in speech production that Broca’s Aphasics are 
aware of. They also have problems with syntax (Rules that govern how words go together in a 
sentence). They can understand very simple grammatical sentences but not much more 
complex than that. 
ex “The boy kicked the girl” vs. “The boy was kicked by the girl”     Speech patterns are often slow, deliberate and lack function words    They cannot repeat words that are said to them with much efficacy because they have 
trouble controlling speech muscles (Dysarthria
  And they have a hard time understanding reversible sentences (They're typically more 
grammatically complex). 
  Wernicke’s Aphasia (Posterior Aphasia)language comprehension disorder. Patients have 
difficulty understanding spoken or written language. Sometimes they cannot understand 
language at all. Speech is fluent with normal grammar and prosody, but it makes no damn 
sense.
    It has been proven however that the full effect of W ernicke’s Aphasia is achieved if and  only if Wernicke’s area is damaged along with the surrounding matter in the posterior 
temporal lobe OR underlying white matter tracts that connects temporal language areas 
to the rest of the brain. 
  Lesions to JUST Werni cke’s area only causes temporary Aphasia and comprehension  improves as swelling reduces.     Conduction Aphasia: Conduction Aphasics can understand words they hear or see and they 
speak words but cannot correct their own errors because there is no information sent from 
Broca’s Area to Wernicke’s Area.  Conduction Aphasia occurs due to damage to the Articulate 
Fasciculus
 
background image   Articulate Fasciculus:  The white matter tract that connects Broca’s Area to Wernicke’s  Area.    Conduction Aphasics they know they have made an error, but they cannot rectify it.    
Global Aphasia: 
A devastating disorder in which a patient would not be able to produce or 
comprehend language.  This would result from extensive left hemisphere damage; pretty much 
decimating Broca’s & Wernicke’s Areas and everywhere in between.
    Classical Model of Language [DEFUNCT]: Specific brain regions performed specific tasks 
such as language comprehension and production. Lichtheim proposed that word storage 
(Wernicke’s Area), speech planning (Broca’s Area), and conceptual information stores are 
located in separate brain regions.
    It assumes that Broca’s/Wernicke’s aphasia is only present respective to the afflicted 
areas themselves and that's INCORRECT. 
  Language emerges from a network of brain regions. It involves:    
Phonology: 
Speech sounds and their mental representation; How sounds are put together into 
words.
    phonemes    Phonology is disrupted in both posterior and anterior aphasias, however the ability to 
produce the correct sound for a given phoneme results more from ANTERIOR damage. 
  Orthography: Knowing how letters are put together into words; visual representation of words   Morphology: Words & word structure   Semantics: Word and sentence meaning   Syntax: Sentence structure     Mental Lexicon: A mental store of information about words which includes semantic and 
syntactic information, as well as the details of the word forms. Once we perceptually analyze 
words, it is hypothesized that three general functions occur. 
    Lexical Access: refers to the stage of processing where the result of prior perceptual analysis 
activates word-form representations in the Lexicon. 
  Lexical Selection: Refers to the selection of the best representation that matches that word-
form input
  Lexical Integration: Words are integrated into a full sentence or larger context. Grammar and 
Syntax are the rules which lexical items are organized. Our mental lexicon must be super-
efficient since we are able to speak so quickly. The mental lexicon is not organized 
alphabetically 
(If it were we wouldn't be able to speak as quickly as we do)
    The first organizational unit in the lexicon is the Morpheme. It is also the smallest meaningful 
unit of language. 
   
The second organizational unit is that words that are used more are accessed more quickly than 
less frequently used words. 
   
A third organizing principle is a Phoneme, which is the smallest unit of sound that makes a 
difference to a meaning.
   
background image fourth organizing factor is the semantic relationships between words.     The organization of the Mental Lexicon (as supported by a Semantic Priming Test) indicates 
that words of similar meaning are grouped together, so that when one word is activated the 
other is too and the brain must decide which word is most appropriate. It also makes words 
easier to follow when a word before it primes its meaning. ex. car primes the word truck. 
    This is the Neighborhood Effect.     ‘Auditory neighborhoods’ consists of words that differ by one phoneme. ex. cat, hat, sat. 
These words are identified more slowly because they have so many neighbors. 
  Semantically similar words prime each other.    Semantic Dementia is the loss of semantic (word meaning) memory after anterior lobe 
damage. The anterior temporal lobes are involved with storing concept information.
    Patients with Semantic Dementia often have trouble assigning objects to a specific 
semantic category. When prompted with a picture of a dog they will say animal instead. 
  This provides some evidence for a semantic network because related meanings are 
substituted, confused or lumped together which is what we would expect of a network of 
interconnected nodes within the mental lexicon. 
  ERP signatures of semantic vs. syntactic violations   The P600 wave is involved with noticing syntactic violations.      Understanding Speech   Listeners have to determine important speech from just noise and divide the speech stream into 
meaningful units. 
    Infants have the ability to distinguish between any phoneme in the first year of their life. 
however their senses became tuned to the language that they were experiencing. The 
sounds they make become more and more similar to the phonemes they hear and by 
the time they are 1, they no longer produce non-native phonemes. 
  Segmentation Problem    
Coarticulation
= No silences between words; two words can be slurred together.
  Segmentation= how we differentiate sounds into separate words.   An important key to understanding speech is prosodic information. It ’s easy to tell the rhythm  of speech especially when a question is asked or when emphasis is being made.     The Superior Temporal Gyrus is important to sound perception. Pure Word Deafness is 
difficulty in understanding speech sounds. Hearing is intact, but individuals cannot hear 
speech.  This is purely auditory and they can still read books and what not.
    Heschl’s Gyri: activated by both speech and non-speech sounds. Associated with hearing 
sound in general.
    But where do we distinguish speech from other sounds?   Binder fMRI Study (2000) 
Non-speech sounds
    Tones    Frequencies 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at New York University who use StudySoup to get ahead
8 Pages 62 Views 49 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at New York University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: New York University
Department: Psychology
Course: Cognitive Neuroscience
Professor: Clay Curtis
Term: Winter 2016
Tags: Psychology, cognitive, neuroscience, neurobiology, and perception
Name: Language + Recitation Articles
Description: Entire language module + 2 recitation articles: McClure & DeLong (2005)
Uploaded: 05/04/2016
8 Pages 62 Views 49 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to NYU - COGNI 25 - Class Notes - Week 8
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here