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GSU - MUS 113 - Study Guide - Midterm

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GSU - MUS 113 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: Georgia State University
Department: Music
Course: Music, Society, and Culture
Professor: Lara Dahl
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Music Appreciation
Name: Study Guide for Fundamentals Quiz
Description: This is the completed study guide with full definitions and explanations.
Uploaded: 08/22/2016
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background image STUDY GUIDE: FUNDAMENTALS Chapter 1 Rhythm, Meter and Tempo
Define the following:
Rhythm:  The actual arrangement of durations­ long and short notes­ in a particular melody or 
some musical passage. Beat: Basic unit of measurement for time in music definition, and example would be tapping a 
foot to the beat.
Accent:  The difference between a strong beat that is emphasized over the weak beat. Meter:  Simply the pattern of strong and weak beats. Measure:  Each occurrence of a repeating patter of accented beats is a measure. Duple meter:  Meter when beats are grouped into twos or fours. (ONE two/ ONE, two) Triple meter:  Meter when beats are grouped in threes. (ONE two three/ ONE two three) Syncopation: The moving of accents in a foreground rhythm away from their normal position in 
background meter. Can occur when an accent is placed in between beats ONE and two.  
Tempo:   Largo (slow), adagio (slow), andante (one the slow side, not too slow), moderato  (moderate), allegro (fast) , presto (very fast), prestissimo (slow to fast) Accelerando (increase in speed), ritardando (gradual decrease) Movements of a composition are generally referred to by their tempo marking Chapter 2 Pitch, Dynamics and Tone Color
Pitch (Frequency):  Quality of sound, low pitches result from long vibrating elements, high 
pitches from short ones. Dynamics (Amplitude):    Pianissimo (very soft), piano (soft), mezzo­piano (medium­soft), mezzo­forte (medium  loud), forte (loud), fortissimo (very loud) Crescendo (growing loud), decrescendo/diminuendo (becoming soft), subito, piu, meno  Tone color (Timbre): the sound and general quality different instruments and voices produce. Instruments (orchestra families), Categorized by the way the sound is produced Strings: Taut strings are attached to a hollow box of air that resonates to amplify the  string sound. Include: Violins, Violas, Cellos, Double bass, and Harps
background image Woodwinds: Series of spaced out holes are bored in a tube, which players open or close  with their fingers or with a lever. Include: Flutes, Clarinets, Oboes, Piccolos, Recorders, English  horn, Bassoon, and Saxophone Brass: Players lips vibrate against a small cup­shaped mouthpiece of metal and this  vibrates air within a long, coiled brass tube. Include: Trumpets, French horn, Trombone, and  Tuba. Percussion: Sound is produced by something being struck. Include: Timpani Keyboard Instruments Include: Piano, Harpsichord, and Organ. Piano: Tuned strings are stuck by felt­covered hammers, activated by a keyboard to  produce sound. Harpsichord: Similar to the piano it has a set of tuned strings that activate from a  keyboard, but with a simpler action. Ensembles: String quartet: Includes: about thirty to thirty­six violins, twelve violas, ten to twelve  cellos, and eight double basses.
 
Chapter 3 Scales and Melody
Intervals: The distance between two pitches in terms of highness and lowness.
Half step: The distance between any two successive notes on the chromatic scale. Whole step: Equivalent to two half steps on the chromatic scale. Octave:  A series of eight notes occupying the interval between the smallest note and the highest 
similar note.
Diatonic scale: Seven note musical scale with 5 whole steps and 2 half steps. Major – The “home pitch” starts with C as the center.
Minor – The “home pitch” starts with A.
Chromatic scale: 12 note musical scale with all pitches separated by a half step. Total scales possible: 12 major scales, 12 minor scales, total of 24 diatonic scales available Sharp: Higher in pitch by a half step.  Flat: Lower in pitch by a half step

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School: Georgia State University
Department: Music
Course: Music, Society, and Culture
Professor: Lara Dahl
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Music Appreciation
Name: Study Guide for Fundamentals Quiz
Description: This is the completed study guide with full definitions and explanations.
Uploaded: 08/22/2016
4 Pages 51 Views 40 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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