×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CU Denver - PSYC 1000 - Class Notes - Week 5
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CU Denver - PSYC 1000 - Class Notes - Week 5

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

CU DENVER / Psychology / PSYC 1000 / What are examples of illusory correlation?

What are examples of illusory correlation?

What are examples of illusory correlation?

Description

School: University of Colorado Denver
Department: Psychology
Course: Introduction to Psychology
Professor: Alex northcutt
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Psychology and research methods
Cost: 25
Name: Research Methods
Description: These notes cover the three different research methods psychologists use and their pros and cons.
Uploaded: 09/01/2016
2 Pages 44 Views 4 Unlocks
Reviews


Cydney Tinsley


What are examples of illusory correlation?



Psychology

Week 2, Day 4: Research Methods

Research Methods

1. Correlation Research

a. Correlation: The degree to which two variables are related.

b. Positive Correlation: As one variable increases, the other variable  increases.

c. Negative Correlation: As one variable increases, the other variable  decreases.

d. Illusory Correlation: When there appears to be a correlation, but the  two variables don’t actually influence each other.

i. Example: In June, July, and August, the number of ice cream  

sales goes up, as does the number of murders.  

In actuality, these are both most likely caused due to the  

increase in weather. When the weather is hot, people like to eat  cold things. Additionally, hot weather can make people more  


What are the advantages and disadvantages of correlation research?



aggressive and angry.

ii. Example: Pirate shortages cause Global Warming.

Obviously, the fact that pirates are becoming fewer has nothing  to do with the Earth getting hotter.

e. Pros of Correlation Research:

i. Helps you to predict behaviors.

ii. It’s a good stepping-stone for research.

f. Cons of Correlation Research: If you want to learn more check out What ability does microscope give a person's naked eye?

i. It can lead you astray.

ii. You cannot infer causality.

2. Descriptive Research

a. Naturalistic Observation: A scientist, or team of scientists, who observe organisms in their natural environment.  

b. Case Study: When a scientist, or team of scientists, ‘zoom in’ and study only one individual.


What are the pros and cons of experimental designs?



c. Validity: Does this measure what it’s supposed to measure?

i. External Validity: How true to real life circumstances is this study designed?

ii. Internal Validity: Ability to control variables.

1. Naturalistic Observation is high in External Validity and  

low in Internal Validity.

2. Case Studies are high in Internal Validity and low in  

External Validity.

d. Generalizability: To what degree does this apply to the population? e. Pros of Descriptive Research:  Don't forget about the age old question of Which changes cause evolution?

i. Able to study unusual circumstances or phenomenon.

ii. Able to study scenarios you can’t typically study in a laboratory. f. Cons of Descriptive Research:  

i. Anecdotal.

ii. Subjective to bias.

iii. Cannot infer causality.

3. Experimental Design  

a. Must have:

i. Independent Variable: A thing that you can change.

Cydney Tinsley

Psychology

Week 2, Day 4: Research Methods

ii. Dependent Variable: Thing that you measure.

1. Example: In a study of the effects of sleep on the scores  

of exams, hours of sleep would be the independent  

variable and the test scores would be the dependent  

variable.

iii. Control Group: A group that you can use in comparison to your  independent variable.  

iv. Random Assignment (whenever possible): A group chosen by  random. By doing this, you should be able to cancel out any pre existing variables that may influence your study. Additionally, it  helps psychologist to understand the Placebo Effect (when  Don't forget about the age old question of How did fossils help darwin further his work and his ideas?

someone gets an effect solely because it is the effect they  

expected to get.).  

b. Experiementor Bias: When the person performing the study is  expecting a certain outcome and that expectation influences their  interpretation of the results.

c. Double Blinded: When both the experimentor and the subject(s) are  blind to the treatment conditions.  

This is preferred in experiments because it helps to eliminate the  Placebo Effect and Experimenter Bias. We also discuss several other topics like How are atoms identified?
If you want to learn more check out What does cartesian dualism propose?
Don't forget about the age old question of Which anatomy refers to the structural changes caused by a disease?

d. Pros of Experimental Design:  

i. The only research method of which you CAN infer causality.

ii. High internal validity.

e. Cons of Experimental Design:

i. Difficult because of ethics. (Can’t test the effects of cocaine on  the brain by assigning one group to do cocaine for three years,  for example).

ii. Low external validity.

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here