Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

SUU - PE 3070 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Aurora Moberly Elite Notetaker

> > > > SUU - PE 3070 - Study Guide - Midterm

SUU - PE 3070 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: Southern Utah University
Department: Physical Education
Course: Exercise Physiology
Professor: Julie Taylor
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: PE 3070 Study Guide Exam 1
Description: These notes cover chapter 0,1,3 for our first exam.
Uploaded: 09/06/2016
0 5 3 82 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Test 1:  9/9  PE 3070 Chapter 0: Introduction to Physiology
­ 
Exercise Physiology: How the body’s structure and functions are altered when exposed to acute and chronic bouts of exercise ­  Sports Physiology: The aspects of exercise physiology used to enhance sport performance and optimally train athletes ­ System responsibilities while the body is exercising:  ­ Skeletal system provides basic framework for the muscles to act
­ Cardiovascular system delivers fuel to cells and removes waste products
­ Cardiovascular and respiratory systems work together to provide oxygen and remove carbon dioxide
­ Integumentary system helps maintain body temperature by allowing the body to exchange heat with its surroundings
­ Nervous and endocrine systems coordinate body temp, maintain fluid and electrolyte balance and assist in the regulation of 
blood pressure ­ First text published was  Physiology of Bodily Exercise by LaGrange 1889 marking it as an academic field of study ­  Harvard Fatigue Laboratory (HFL) was operational in 1927 and the first exercise physiology research lab   ­ It furthered knowledge and recognition of the field
­ Researched methods to help soldiers be better soldiers in WWII
­ 
A.V. Hill came up with the idea of this lab but wasn’t directly involved ­  D.B. Bill was the first director of research at HFL; Father of exercise physiology research ­  Sid Robinson studied ageing effects on exercise; Student at HFL ­  David Costill collaborated with Sid Robinson; Wrote my textbook ­  Joel Stager worked with David Costill; Studied exercise and altitude; Mentored my professor ­ Acute Responses: Breathing rates, sweat rates, muscle swelling, heart rate, oxygen consumption, blood pressure, rate of fatigue,  hydration status, lactate in blood, cardiac output, stroke volume
­ Chronic Responses: Body composition, muscle size, resting blood pressure, resting heart rate, VO
2Max , resting metabolic rate,  exercise capacity, force production, fatigue rate, LDL & HDL 
­ Factors that affect acute/chronic responses: Temperature, time of day, environment 
­ 
Ergometer: An exercise device that allows the intensity of exercise to be controlled and measured ­ Treadmills are the most common ergometer ­  Cross­Sectional Research Design: A cross section of the population of interest is tested at one time and the differences between  subgroups from that sample are compared
­ 
Longitudinal Research Design: The same research subjects are retested periodically after initial testing to measure changes over  time in variables of interest
­ 
Dose­Response Relation: The higher the dose of exercise training the higher the resulting variable ­  Crossover Design: The two groups of subjects undergo being the control group and the treatment group; This design was made to  overcome the placebo effect Chapter 1: Structure and Function of Exercising Muscle
­ 
Smooth Muscle (Involuntary): Located in the walls of blood vessels and internal organs; Controlled by the autonomic nervous  system
­ 
Cardiac Muscle (Involuntary): Muscle that makes up the heart’s structure; Found only in the heart ­ Controlled by the autonomic nervous and endocrine systems, striated, intercalated disks ­  Skeletal Muscle (Voluntary): Muscle that attaches to and moves skeleton; Controlled by somatic nervous system, striated ­ The bones of the skeleton and the skeletal muscle make up what is called the  musculoskeletal system ­ More than 600 different skeletal muscles located throughout the body ­ Anatomy of Skeletal Muscle ­  Epimysium: Outermost layer of connective tissue surrounding the entire muscle; Functions to hold the muscle together and give it shape
­ 
Tendon: Fibrous cords of connective tissue that transmit the force generated by muscle fibers to bone thereby creating  motion
­ 
Fascicles: Bundles of fibers wrapped in a connective tissue sheath called the perimysium
background image Test 1:  9/9  PE 3070 ­  Muscle Fibers: Located inside the fascicles and are made up of one muscle cell that is multinucleated; Covered by a sheath  of connective tissue called the  endomysium ­ Structure of Individual Muscle Fibers: ­  Sarcolemma: Composed of plasmalemma and the basement membrane ­  Satellite Cells: Located between the plasmalemma an the basement membrane, involved in the growth and  development of skeletal muscle ­  Plasmalemma: Plasma membrane that surrounds the muscle fiber ­ Folds up when rested so when the muscle fiber stretches it has room to do so
­ Contains functional folds in the innervations zone that assist in the transmission of the action potential from the 
motor neuron to the muscle fiber
­ Helps maintain acid­base balance and transport of metabolites from the capillary blood into the muscle fiber
­  Myofibrils: Small fibers that make up the basic contractile element of skeletal muscle ­  Sarcoplasm: Cytoplasm that surrounds myofibrils, contains transverse tubules (T­tubules) and the sarcoplasmic  reticulum (SR)  ­  T­Tubules: Extensions of the plasmalemma that pass laterally through the muscle fiber; Allow transport of  substances through the muscle fibers as well as nerve impulses 
­ 
SR: Longitudinal network of tubules that store calcium ­  Sacromere: Basic functional unit of a myofibril and the basic contractile unit of muscle ­ Sacromere: Extends from z­disk to z­disk ­  I­Band: Light band, actin ­  A­Band: Dark band, actin and myosin ­  H­Zone: Halfway zone, myosin, may disappear during contraction ­  M­Line: Middle, m­protein, holds myosin in place ­  Titin: Wraps around myosin to help stabilize myosin ­  Z­Disk: Sarcomere end plates, stabilizes actin ­  Nebulin: Stabilizes actin ­  Myosin Filament: Myosin molecule is composed of two protein strands twisted together and one end of each strand is folded into a  globular head; Thick filament ­ Stiffness of titin changes when bound to calcium and may allow you to produce more force ­  Actin Filament: Thin filament composed of three protein molecules actin, tropomyosin and troponin ­  Actin: Forms the backbone of the filament ­  Tropomyosin: Tube­shaped protein that twists around actin strands blocking myosin binding sites when at rest ­  Troponin: Attached to both actin and tropomyosin and has a binding site for calcium ­ When calcium binds with troponin is causes tropomyosin to change its shape and open up the myosin binding sites ­ Muscle Fiber Contraction ­ Initiation of muscle contraction occurs in response to a signal from the nervous system
­ 
Alpha Motor Neuron: Nerve cell that connects with and innervates many muscle fibers; Determines which myosin  ATPase the muscle fibers will have
­ 
Motor Unit: A single  ­motor neuron and all the muscle fibers it innervates α ­  Neuromuscular Junction: The synapse between the  ­motor neuron and a muscle fiber; This is where the communication  α between the nervous and muscular system occurs 
­ 
Excitation­Contraction Coupling: Muscle contraction begins with excitation of a motor neuron and that results in a  contraction of the muscle fibers
­ 
Action Potential: Nerve impulse ­  Acetylcholinesterase: Breaks down acetocholine (ACh) constantly during muscle contraction ­ When a muscle contracts the filaments do not change length, they slide past each other appearing shorter ­ Steps of Muscle Fiber Contraction: 1. Stimulus of the  ­motor neuron from an action potential α 2. When the action potential arrives at the axon terminal the nerve endings release a neurotransmitter, ACh
background image Test 1:  9/9  PE 3070 3. ACh then crosses the synaptic cleft and binds to receptors on the plasmalemma
4. If enough ACh binds then the action potential will be spread across the muscle fiber membrane and open up Na
+  ion gates 5. Sodium will enter the muscle cell and start the process of depolarization 
6. The action potential travels to the T­tubules to the interior of the cell causing the SR to release its stored calcium 
7. Calcium binds to troponin causing tropomyosin to move off the myosin binding sites of actin
8. Myosin heads are able to bind to actin creating cross­bridges and muscle contraction begins
­ Sliding Filament Theory:  ­ When myosin cross­bridges are activated, they bind with actin, resulting in a conformational change in the cross­bridge  which causes the myosin head to tilt and drag the thin filament toward the center of the sarcomere
­ 
Power Stroke: The tilting of the myosin head ­ The pulling of the thin filament past the thick shortens the sarcomere and generates force
1. The myosin head binds to ATP
2. ATPase located on the head splits ATP into ADP and P causing the power stroke; ATPase is activated by magnesium
3. Myosin head remains on the actin until more ATP binds to the head
4. When ATP binds again to the head it re­cocks are prepares for the next power stroke father down the actin filament
5. This action causes the filaments to slide over each other and the sacromere “shortens”
6. This continues until the Z­disks are reached or calcium pumped back into the SR
­ Muscle Relaxation ­ At the end of muscle contraction calcium is pumped back into the SR through an active calcium­pumping system
­ The calcium­pumping system requires ATP to actively pump calcium back into the SR
­ When calcium leaves the troponin and tropomyosin return to their resting places causing the thick and thin filaments to 
return to their original relaxed state ­ Muscle Fiber Types ­  Type I Fibers: Slow­twitch ­ Slow oxidative system, high oxidative capacity, low glycolytic capacity, sow contractile speed, high fatigue 
resistance, low motor unit strength
­ High level of aerobic endurance, recruited during low­intensity events
­  Type II Fibers: Fast­twitch, anaerobic exercise, short­high intensity exercise ­  Type IIa: Most frequently recruited; Fast oxidative/glycolytic system, moderately high oxidative capacity, high  glycolytic capacity, fast contractile speed, moderate fatigue resistance, high motor unit strength
­ 
Type IIx: Fast glycolytic system, low oxidative capacity, highest glycolytic capacity, fast contractile speed, low  fatigue resistance, high motor unit strength
­ 
Type IIc: Least used, not a lot is known about them ­ Type I and Type II fibers differ in their speeds of contraction due to their form of myosin ATPase (Type I has a slow  ATPase and Type II has a fast ATPase)
­ Type II fibers have a better developed SR than Type I making them more adapt at delivering calcium to the muscle cell
­ The  ­motor neuron in Type I has a smaller cell body and innervates less than 300 muscle fibers
α ­ The  ­motor neuron in Type II has a larger cell body and innervates more than 300 muscle fibers meaning more fibers  α contract when a Type II muscle cell is stimulated creating that large contractile force
­ Type II muscle fibers tend to be larger in size than Type I muscle fibers
­ Muscle Fiber Recruitment ­ If a muscle wants more force it recruits more motor units
­ 
Principle of Orderly Recruitment: Motor units are activated on the basis of a fixed order of fiber recruitment in which  motor units within a given muscle appear to be ranked
­ 
Size Principle: The order of recruitment of motor units is directly related to the size of their motor neuron ­ Motor units with smaller motor neurons will be recruited first ­ Muscle Movement occurs in three types of contractions concentric, static and eccentric ­  Concentric Contraction: Shortening of a muscle, dynamic contraction ­ Slow concentric contractions produce the maximal force ­  Dynamic Contraction occurs when there is joint movement

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Southern Utah University who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 45 Views 36 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Southern Utah University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Southern Utah University
Department: Physical Education
Course: Exercise Physiology
Professor: Julie Taylor
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: PE 3070 Study Guide Exam 1
Description: These notes cover chapter 0,1,3 for our first exam.
Uploaded: 09/06/2016
7 Pages 45 Views 36 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to SUU - PE 3070 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to SUU - PE 3070 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here