Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

AU - LAS 2010 - Study guide for Unit 1 - Study Guide

Created by: Courtney Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > AU - LAS 2010 - Study guide for Unit 1 - Study Guide

AU - LAS 2010 - Study guide for Unit 1 - Study Guide

School: Auburn University
Department: Liberal Arts and Sciences
Course: Intro to Psychology
Professor: Jennifer Daniels
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Psychology, Biology, Of, The, mind, Sigmund Freud, daniels, calkins, Contemporary, Modern, post, approach, Theory, behaivor, bioligical, and auburn
Name: Study guide for Unit 1
Description: This study guide is a tool to help you on this test. This is NOT an answer key and doesn’t guarantee that things will or won’t be on the test on this study guide, but it will include everything I beli
Uploaded: 09/06/2016
0 5 3 21 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 5 of a 28 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Study Guide Unit 1 Test  This study guide is a tool to help you on this test.  This is NOT an answer key and doesn’t  guarantee that things will or won’t be on the test on this study guide, but it will include everything  I believe will be on the test.  I have taken extensive class notes and notes from the book.  According to the syllabus the test will be to 40 multiple choice questions (worth two points each)  and two essay questions (worth 10 points each).  The notes in  green are my notes from the  book  and the everything else is lecture orientated. This is what I will be studying for the test and  I hope it helps you out! Email me at  ​cky0002@auburn.edu​ if you have any questions.  ​If you  want vocabulary from this unit check out my  studysoup page for Vocabulary Test #1!       Chapter 1; Introduction; The story of Psychology     ­Psychology; ​ Learning/Practicing the approach to human actions and interactions.    ­How do we define psychology?  ­Study of the mind, behaviors and emotions  ­Scientific study of behaviors and mental processes  ­The science of psychology is the use of systematic methods to observe,  describe, predict and explain behavior  ­The behavior of psychology is everything we do that can be observed  ­The mental processes of psychology is the thoughts, feelings and motives that  each of us experience privately, but cannot be observed directly.    ­Is psychology more than common sense?  ­e.x. People that live together before marriage have longer, happier marriages   True or False  False, data shows divorce rates are higher for those who live together before  marriage  *^To follow up with the previous question, psychology isn’t always common sense.  When asking a class opinion on many topics the opinions will be split down the middle.  This is why adequate research, not just common sense, is required to make a factual  conclusion to a statement. 
background image   Let’s talk about...     Roots of Psychology   Psychological Science is Born  ­Aristotle theorized about learning and memory, motivation and emotion, perception and  personality  ­Wundt seeked to measure  “atoms of the mind”  ­ the fastest and simplest mental  processes>> Began first psychological laboratory  ­New science of psychology became organized into different schools of thought;  functionalism (Wundt) and structuralism (Titchener> Used introspection to search for the  mind’s structural elements)    Where did psychology come from?    What event defined the start of scientific psychology  ­Scientific psychology began in Germany in 1879 when Wilhelm Wundt opened in the  first psychology laboratory    Why did introspection fail as a method for understanding how the mind works?    Structuralism used introspection to define the mind’s makeup; Functionalism focused on how  mental processes enable us to adapt, survive and flourish    ­Philosophy, biology and physiology­  ­Greek philosopher­ Socrates, Plato and Aristotle   ­French philosopher­ Descartes  ­Direct Observation, reasoning, theory of motivation, drives, sensing,  remembering, desiring, reacting, thinking, memory and sleep         
background image Modern Psychology     ­1879 University of Leipzig­ Wilhelm Wundt; First psychology lab    <As the first individual to refer to themselves as a psychologist, Wilhelm Wundt founded  the first laboratory that was used exclusively for psychology research in 1879 in Leipzig,  Germany. >     ­Two schools of thought and  structuralism ​and​ functionalism​ (​Wundt  and  Titchener );     ­Structuralism­ ​ Attempt to identify structures of the human mind with  introspection ( looking inward   ­Functionalism­ ​ Concerned with the functions and purposes of the mind and  behavior in the way we adapt to the environment  (looking outward *environment*)    ­William James (functionalist) thought it would be more fun to consider the evolved  functions of our thoughts and feelings  ­Encourages exploration of down to earth emotions, memories, willpower, habits,  and moment to moment stream of consciousness  ­Mentored Mary Calkins  ­Charles Darwin assumed that thinking developed because is was adaptive and was  contributed to our ancestor’s survival  ­Consciousness serves a function to enable us to consider our past, adjust to our  present and plan our future    ­Important Females­     <Women in the 19th/20th century were not allowed to hold any power in the psychological  profession.  They were allowed to sit in classes, but were not allowed to graduate with a  psychology degree.   Both of the women listed below were very high, if not the highest, in their  class.>   
background image ­ Mary Calkins ; first female president of APA, Wasn’t allowed to graduate Harvard  psychology  ­When Calkins joined the Harvard Psychology program all the other students  (males) dropped out  ­ Washburn ; first female to receive a phD (second president of APA)     Contemporary Approaches    <While humans have evolved over time so has our education in psychology. With so many new  theories and approaches, there is no right or wrong approach, each one just bring a different  understanding to human behavior.  So when studying these approaches understand that each  one is unique and is a different way to view our behavior in different environments.>    How did psychology continue to develop from the 1920s through today?  ­”The science of mental life”  ­1920’s Two major “larger than life” American psychologists; Flamboyant and Watson  ­Equality provocative Skinner who dismissed introspection and redefined  psychology as the science of observable behavior  ­Freudian Psychology was also a major force (unconscious behaviors/desires from  childhood experiences)  ­1960’s Humanistic Psychology; Studying the current environmental influences can  nurture or limit our growth potential, and the importance of having our needs for love and  acceptance satisfied (Rogers and Maslow)  ­1960’s cognitive revolution; led the field back to its early interest in mental processes  such as the importance of how our mind processes and retains information    ­Biological Approach­ ​ Examines behavior and mental processes through a focus on the body,  especially the brain and nervous system  ­e.x. Talking in front of others < one of the number one fears    ­*Behavior­ The things that can be observed and mental processes   
background image ­Neuroscience Approach­ ​ Studies the structure, function, development, genetics and  biochemistry of the nervous system  ­Thoughts and emotions have a physical basis in the brain  ­How is blood chemistry linked with moods and emotions?    ­Behavioral Approach­ ​ Emphasizes the scientific study of observable behavioral responses  and their environmental determinants.  ­In simple terms;  Have you had this experience before? And if so, how did it go?   ­e.x. Having a bad experience reading in front of others creates a  response of fear to present in front of others.  ­How do we learn to fear certain objects? Stop smoking?  ­How does the environment affect our behavior and vice versa?  ­Well­controlled, lab experiments initially, now some natural settings.  ­Rewards and Punishments determine our behavior.  ­We can make others do certain things by using this method of reward vs  punishment.   ­Not all behaviorists reject cognitions as important.    ­ John Watson  (1878­1958); The first individual who said we have to be able to measure  behaviors.  Very systematic method in studying behaviors.    ­ B.F. Skinner  (1904­1990); “Operant Conditioning” Studied a lot about reinforcement and  punishment.    ­Freud  (1856­1939); Unconscious thoughts, childhood experiences, conflicts between biological  instincts and societal demands<< Very hard method to prove experimentally  ­Freud main themes in his research was sex and anger; and his studies  were done on mostly women, who are living in a period of women's  oppression before an age of feminism.    ­Humanistic Approach­ ​ People choose to live by higher human values emphasizes positive  qualities and growth.  Having self understanding and awareness.  ­Carl Rogers ; He would use Humanistic Approach through unconditional positive regard.   

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Auburn University who use StudySoup to get ahead
28 Pages 86 Views 68 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Auburn University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Auburn University
Department: Liberal Arts and Sciences
Course: Intro to Psychology
Professor: Jennifer Daniels
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Psychology, Biology, Of, The, mind, Sigmund Freud, daniels, calkins, Contemporary, Modern, post, approach, Theory, behaivor, bioligical, and auburn
Name: Study guide for Unit 1
Description: This study guide is a tool to help you on this test. This is NOT an answer key and doesn’t guarantee that things will or won’t be on the test on this study guide, but it will include everything I beli
Uploaded: 09/06/2016
28 Pages 86 Views 68 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Recommended Documents
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to AU - Psyc 2010 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to AU - Psyc 2010 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here