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UTC - PSY 3310 - Class Notes - Week 4

Created by: Annah Shrader Elite Notetaker

UTC - PSY 3310 - Class Notes - Week 4

School: University of Tennessee - Chattanooga
Department: Psychology
Course: Social Psychology
Professor: David Ross
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Social Psychology Week 4 Notes
Description: These notes are on the last half of chapter 12 in the textbook as well as the lecture on 9/15/16.
Uploaded: 09/16/2016
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background image Social Psychology  Week Four  9/15/16    Chapter 12 Notes Part Two:  Love 
 
  Different specialties in psychology lead to different views. Evolutionary  Psychologists believe that women and men can be explained by reproductive 
success and survival. Other psychologists believe there is more to the story and 
that humans override evolution perspectives in wake of cultural influence.  
    The theory of triangular love covers three important parts of love: intimacy,  passion and commitment. These three options can be varied into 8 different 
types of love.  
o  Intimacy covers the feeling of being close to another person. 
o  Passion is the intense craving to be around a person. It involved physical 
and sexual attraction. This is the butterflies in your stomach 
stage. Interesting studies have been conducted to find whether the 
intense state of passion can be connected to other intense states like fear. 
Researchers have found it’s more likely to fall in love in a frightening 
situation.  
o  Commitment is the third part of the theory of love where it is maintained.  It involves companionate love. This is a calm and stable love. It's usually 
developed through lifetime experiences together, as well as time to gain 
trust. There are shared values involved.  
    Relationships vary across cultures. Individualistic versus Collectivist.      Some research shows that arranged marriages offer more satisfaction, but the  results aren't conclusive.  
 
 
  There are many models and theories attempting to explain how relationships are  maintained.  o  Social exchange theory: when in a long term relationship, the benefits  should out way the costs. If they don't, problems arise.   o  Equity Theory: relationships are most satisfying when both partners  contribute equally in terms of benefits. 
background image o  The investment model: if you put a lot into a relationship (time, energy),  you are less likely to break it off than if you put little effort.    
John Gottman's Conflict: 
 
1.) Criticism: attacking aspects of partner 
2.) Stonewalling: refusal to communicate. 
3.) Contempt: repulsion to partner. 
4.) Defensiveness: protecting self foremost 
 
Negative attribution style: the partner does a positive thing, but the other partner 
believes it to be making up for something bad. If the guy brings the girl flowers, instead 
of the girl being happy she asks "what did you do this time?" It is essentially thinking the 
worst of the partner's intentions.  
 
Jealousy 
 
  Women are more likely to feel jealous of another woman's physical traits,  and males are more likely to feel jealous over the perceived rank and 
social success of the other males.  
  Women feel more threatened by emotional "cheating" than sexual, while  men feel more threatened by physical cheating in a relationship.     Lecture Notes:  Review with additions There are two types of emotions    Basic Emotions: These are not learned. We are born with them. Researchers  figured this out by videotaping infants in infant theatres and showing them 
different slides with different images on them. The infants gave off facial 
expressions in reaction. These facial expressions were mapped. Basic emotions 
require no cognition or thought to occur. Evolutionists believe their purpose is for 
infants to communicate. All humans across cultures show the same basic 
emotions.  
o  Blood pressure, heart rate, sweating, and breathing all increase with all  the emotions except for interest which produces the opposite 
physiological response.  

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School: University of Tennessee - Chattanooga
Department: Psychology
Course: Social Psychology
Professor: David Ross
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Social Psychology Week 4 Notes
Description: These notes are on the last half of chapter 12 in the textbook as well as the lecture on 9/15/16.
Uploaded: 09/16/2016
4 Pages 12 Views 9 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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