Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UNL - BIOC 431 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Plambam31 Elite Notetaker

> > > > UNL - BIOC 431 - Study Guide - Midterm

UNL - BIOC 431 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: University of Nebraska Lincoln
Department: Biochemistry
Course: Structure and Metabolism
Professor: Barycki
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: biochemistry
Name: BIOC 431 Midterm 1 Study Guide
Description: This study guide has basically everything you need to know for the first exam, including elaborate definitions and explanations, examples, equations, and applications of all concepts gone over in class through chapter 5.
Uploaded: 09/16/2016
0 5 3 14 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 14 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image   BIOC 431 (Dr. Barycki) Midterm 1 Study  Guide    
 
      
​Highlight​ = Equations            ​Highlight​ = Important Concepts           ​Highlight​ = Key Terms   
 
Chapters 2 and 3   ­  ​Water​ and ​Amino Acids, Peptides, and Proteins  ( Week 1 Important Basic Terms to Know 
 
­ Hydrogen bonds ​: Dipole­dipole or charge­dipole interactions occurring between two  electronegative atoms (a proton acceptor and a proton donor)  ­ Typically 4­6 kj/mol in strength (weak)   
      ­
Ionic Interactions ​: Attraction or repulsion due to charges    ­ Hydrophilic Compound ​: A compound that dissolves in water (water­loving).  ­ Polar or charged compounds    ­ Hydrophobic Compound ​: A compound that does NOT dissolve in water (water­hating).  ­ Nonpolar compounds (i.e. lipids)    ­ Amphipathic Compound ​: A compound that has both hydrophobic and hydrophilic  properties.  ­ Phospholipid bilayer in cell membranes, soap, etc.    ­ Hydrophobic Interactions ​: Forces that cause nonpolar regions of molecules to cluster  together.    ­ Van der Waals Interactions: ​ Weak attractive forces between any two uncharged atoms.    ­ Buffer ​: Resists drastic changes in pH by converting strong acids or bases into weak  ones.  ­ Bicarbonate, etc.    ­ Buffering Region ​: This is the flat zone on a titration curve where there is the strongest  resistance to a change in pH.  
background image     ­ Amino Acid Residue: ​ An amino acid linked to another via a peptide bond in a  polypeptide chain.    ­ PI: ​ This is the ​isoelectric point​ or isoelectric pH, which is the pH where there is no net  electric charge of an amino acid    Water    ­ The solubility of a molecule is mainly determined by its interactions with water  ­ If a molecule is polar or charged, it will dissolve in water  ­ If a molecule is predominantly hydrophobic, due to its nonpolar character, it will 
cluster together with other hydrophobic molecules (via hydrophobic interactions) 
in order to have the most favorable 
​entropy (randomness)​ by causing the water  molecules around to be less ordered around the cluster.  ­ The Henderson­Hasselbalch equation can be used to describe the equilibrium of weak 
acid deprotonation 
­ pH = pKa + log ([A ­ ]/[HA])  ­ 10 (pH­pKa)  = [A ­ ]/[HA]   ­ When there are  ​equal concentrations of A​ ­  and HA, the pka = the pH  ­ pKa = ­log (Ka)  ­ pH = ­log ([H + ])  ­ Buffers work best 1 pH unit above or below the pka    Amino Acids and Peptides    ­ Amino Acids are the building blocks of proteins and  ​consist of 4 parts:        1. An  ​alpha carbon​, which is a chiral center (except in glycine)        2. An  ​alpha amino group        3. A  ​carboxylic acid        4. A  ​side chain (R­group)    ­ Amino acids bind to each other to create polypeptides through covalent bonds ​ called  Peptide Bonds  ­ These occur between the ​ alpha carboxyl group of one amino acid and the alpha  amino group of another  ­ This happens via a  ​dehydration reaction​.  ­ In a polypeptide chain, the  ​N­terminus​ is at the beginning and the ​C­terminus​ is  at the end.    ­ Amino Acids are  ​Zwitterionic​ (both (+) and (­) charged) at ​neutral pH  ­ Amino group gives the positive charge  ­ Carboxylic acid group gives the negative charge 
background image   ­ ** ​Some charged R­groups can further influence overall charge of amino acids​**   
      ­      ** 
​Amino Acids with R­groups that are charged​**:         ­      ​Negative​→ Aspartate (Asp) + Glutamate (Glu)         ­      ​Positive​→  Histidine (His), Lysine (Lys), and Arginine (Arg)    ­ The pKa of a ​ carboxylic group is ~2.1​ and the pKa of an ​amino group is ~9.5    ­ Aromatic Amino Acids Absorb UV light  ­ Tryptophan (Trp), Tyrosine (Tyr), and Phenylalanine (Phe) all absorb UV light,  with Trp being the best (due to its abundant conjugation of pi electrons), then Tyr (due to 
its resonance with the extra oxygen), and then Phe. 
  Working With Proteins 
 
­ Proteins are able to be separated by  ​3 different physical properties:  ­ Size  ­ Charge  ­ Function    ­ What is a pI?  ­ A pI is the pH where an amino acid has no net charge.  ­ A pI can  ​NOT​ be calculated. It must be determined experimentally.  ­ If an amino acid has a pI of 8, then at a pH of 6 (below the pI), that amino acid 
would most likely have a positive charge (not always though). 
­ At a pH of 10 (above the pI), that amino acid would most likely have a negative 
charge (not always though). 
­ Therefore, generally this is true:       ​ ←​ +  pI  ­ ​→    → This illustrates the general rule that a   pH above the pI makes the  amino acid negative , and a  pH below the pI makes the amino acid  positive   ­ There are  ​3 main ways to separate proteins:  ­ Ion Exchange Chromatography  ­ Size Exclusion Chromatography  ­ Affinity Chromatography    ­ Ion Exchange Chromatography:    ­ In this method of protein separation, a column full of beads with a positive or  negative charge are used to separate proteins based on their different charges. 
background image   ­ Cation Exchange Columns  have negatively charged beads that are intended to  slow positively charged proteins down (due to attraction), while negatively charged 
proteins elute much quicker due to repulsion. 
­ Anion Exchange Columns   have positively charged beads that slow down  negatively charged proteins (due to attraction), while positively charged proteins elute 
much quicker due to repulsion. 
­ To elute the proteins stuck in the beads due to charge, you can either salt the  column or change the pH of the column.  ​Salting it neutralizes all of the charges​, causing  the proteins to release from the beads.  ​Changing the pH changes the charge of the  proteins ​, causing them to release from the beads.   
 
­ Size Exclusion Chromatography:    ­  This method of separation uses small cavities in the resin of the column to  separate proteins by their size. Pressure is the force of separation.  ­ The small cavities cause the small and medium sized proteins to get more  “caught up” in the cavities.   ­ The  ​larger proteins will go around the cavities, eluting through the column much  quicker. ​ This is due to the fact that they don’t fit into the cavities.  ­ Although this is a good method of protein separation, it  ​cannot separate proteins  of similar molecular weight (MW) ​. They would elute at around the same time.    ­ Affinity Chromatography:    ­ This separation method uses specific ligands covalently attached to the beads of  the column that are specific to the function of the target proteins.  ­ The  ​target proteins bind to the ligands and are slowed down​, while contaminants  are eluted through first.     ­ For  ​Purification of Recombinant Proteins:    ­ Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography  ­ Recombinant proteins can be  ​tagged​ with (His)​ 6  tags (bind to Ni 2+ ) or  Glutathione­S­transferases (GST ­ binds to glutathione).  ­ Depending on the type of tag the protein has, the beads of the column will 
contain the substance the tags have affinities for.  
­ When the target protein passes through the column, it will stick to the 
beads due to its affinity for them.  
­ To elute the target proteins, you can  ​change the pH to alter the proteins’  charges ​ or ​add imidazole​ to the column.   
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Nebraska Lincoln who use StudySoup to get ahead
14 Pages 56 Views 44 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Nebraska Lincoln who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Nebraska Lincoln
Department: Biochemistry
Course: Structure and Metabolism
Professor: Barycki
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: biochemistry
Name: BIOC 431 Midterm 1 Study Guide
Description: This study guide has basically everything you need to know for the first exam, including elaborate definitions and explanations, examples, equations, and applications of all concepts gone over in class through chapter 5.
Uploaded: 09/16/2016
14 Pages 56 Views 44 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UNL - BIOC 431 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UNL - BIOC 431 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here