Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

CU Denver - BIOL 3244 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Alexandra Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > CU Denver - BIOL 3244 - Study Guide - Midterm

CU Denver - BIOL 3244 - Study Guide - Midterm

0 5 3 18 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 8 of a 59 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image   Anatomy  EXAM 1 1
background image Body Organization and Anatomic Terminology Anatomy is defined as: (Greek) “to cut up, to dissect”; it is the science concerned with the physical structure 
of the organism, in this case the human
Histology: the study of (normal) tissues
Pathology: the study of the disease state and abnormal tissues
I. Taxonomic Classification Domain Eukarya
Eukaryotic cells
o Kingdom Animalia
No cell walls, plastids, or photosynthetic pigments
Phylum Chordata
Dorsal hollow nerve cord, spinal cord
Class Mammalia
Mammary glands, hair
o Order Primates
Well developed brain, prehensile hands
Family Hominidae
Large cerebrum, bipedal locomotion
Genus Homo
Flattened face, prominent chin and nose, with 
inferiorly positioned nostrils
o Species  sapiens Largest cerebrum II. Anatomical characteristics A. Brain weighs: about 1350-1400 grams (~3 lbs) Emotion, thought, reasoning, memory, precise, coordinated movement B. Bipedal locomotion C. Sigmoid curvature of the spine, anatomy of hips and thighs, arched feet D. Opposable thumb –true of all primates E. Well-developed vocal structures, have articulated speech F. Stereoscopic vision: gives us depth perception III.Levels of organization of the human body A. Cellular Level: basic structural and functional component of life. We have 60-100  trillion cells. Organelles – carry out a specific function within the cell. B. Tissue Level: an aggregation of similar cells that perform a common function.  Four principal kinds of tissues: Epithelial tissue covers body surfaces, lines body cavities, and forms glands and ducts Connective tissue bind, support, and protect body parts; includes the blood 1. Matrix: nonliving intercellular material (liquid, semisolid, solid) secreted by tissue cells Muscle tissue contracts to produce movement Nervous Tissue initiates and transmits nerve impulses from one body part to another C. Organ Level: an aggregate of tissue types that perform a specific function. Usually  there is a primary tissue and secondary tissue. However, an organ will have all four 
tissues.
D. System Level: a body system consists of various organs that have similar or related  functions. Examples – circulatory, respiratory, digestive, nervous, endocrine. The 
systems of the body are interrelated and make up the organism.
1
background image IV. Anatomy is a new language.  Learning anatomy will be very much like learning another language. We need a starting point.  A. All anatomical terms are in relationship to what is known as the  anatomical  position The body is erect, the feet parallel, the eyes directed forward, the arms to the sides, and the palms  directed forward, with the fingers straight down.
It is imperative to learn this position, and remember that all anatomical terms come from this 
position.  V. Terms A. Positions Superior: directional reference meaning above Inferior: directional reference meaning below
Anterior: pertaining to the front of the body
Posterior: pertaining to the back of the body
Ventral: towards the chest or belly
Dorsal: towards the back
Medial: toward the midline of the body
Lateral: away from the midline of the body
Proximal: toward the trunk of the body
Distal: away from the trunk of the body 1. Frequently, in the digestive system, proximal means closer to the mouth and distal is  closer to the anus 2. Sometimes in the circulatory system, proximal means closer to the arterial side, and distal will mean closer to the venous side Ipsilateral: on the same side Contralateral: on the opposite side
Rostral (lit.: “towards the beak”) in neuroanatomy, towards the forehead
Caudal: in neuroanatomy, away from the forehead, towards the spinal cord  B. Movement Flexion: movement that decreases the angle of the parts of the joint Extension: movement that increases the angle of the parts of the joint
Hyperextension: extension of the joint past anatomic position- the neck, shoulder, hip
Adduction: movement towards the axis or midline of the body
Abduction: movement away from the midline of the body
Supine/supination: placement of a body part so that the anterior surface is superior
Pronate/pronation: placement of a body part so that the posterior surface is superior
Circumduction: the distal end of the body part describes a circle, but the bone does not rotate C. Special movements Inversion: a turning inward, as the ankle
Eversion: a turning outward, as the ankle
Dorsiflexion: with the ankle, the superior surface of the foot approaches the shin
Plantar flexion: with the ankle extension of the foot – pointing the toes
Retraction: A body part moves posteriorly in a horizontal plane
Protraction: A body part moves anteriorly in horizontal plane—moving jaw anteriorly at the TMJ
Elevation: moves a body part superiorly—moving shoulders superiorly 
Depression: moves a body part inferiorly—moving shoulders inferiorly/pressing down
Lateral flexion: moves the vertebral column in a lateral direction (to the side) 2
background image VI.  Body Regions There are other ways of describing locations within the human body. Anatomists will talk about regions 
and quadrants of the abdominopelvic regions as well as the cavities located in the body. In addition, 
things can be described with respect to various imaginary planes that bisect the body.
A. Major Regions of the Body – see text for more complete list Cephalic: head Cervical: neck
Thoracic: chest
Brachium: the arm from the shoulder to the  elbow Antebrachium: the forearm
Antecubital: the front of the elbow
Carpus: wrist
Pubis: the anterior pelvis
Inguinal: the groin Lumbar: lower back
Gluteus: buttocks
Femur: thigh
Patella:kneecap
Crus: leg from the knee to the ankle
Talus: ankle
Plantar: sole of foot B. Abdominal quadrant system – frequently used clinically; marked by a mid-sagittal  and transverse plane through the umbilicus Left upper quadrant Right upper quadrant
Left lower quadrant
Right lower quadrant C. Abdominal subdivision System Left and Right Hypochondriac regions –  1. Left and right upper one-third regions of abdomen Left and Right Lumbar (or Lateral) Regions 2. Left and right middle lateral regions of abdomen Left and Right Iliac (or inguinal) regions 3. Left and right lower one-third regions of abdomen Epigastric Region 4. Upper, central one third of abdomen Umbilical region 5. Center of abdomen Hypogastric 6. Lower, central one-third of abdomen VII. Body Planes A. Sagittal and Midsagittal Planes: Sagittal plane: a vertical plane that divides the body into left and right portions Midsagittal plane: the plane that passes through the mid-plane of the body, dividing it equally 
into right and left halves (plane that goes through middle of body)
B. Transverse or horizontal: Divide the body into superior and inferior portions C. Frontal or coronal: A vertical plane that divides the body into anterior and posterior  portions VIII. Body Cavities A. Dorsal Body cavity Cranial cavity: contains the brain Vertebral cavity: contains the spinal cord B. Ventral Body Cavity: divided by diaphragm 3
background image Thoracic cavity: upper or chest cavity 1. Pleural: two pleural cavities surround the right and left lungs 2. Mediastinum: the area between the two lungs
3. Pericardial: the cavity that surrounds the heart
Abdominopelvic Cavity: lower ventral cavity  4. Abdomen: upper contains stomach, small intestine, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, and  spleen 5. Pelvis: contains the terminal portion of the large intestine, the urinary bladder, certain  reproductive organs IX.  Body Membranes A. Mucous membranes (noun – mucus): Produce thick, sticky fluid. Line various  cavities and tubes that enter or exit the body: oral, nasal cavities, respiratory, 
reproductive, digestive systems.
B. Serous Membranes – Line the ventral body cavity: line the thoracic and  abdominopelvic cavities and cover visceral organs, producing a watery lubricant called 
serous fluid or a transudate.
*serous membranes DO NOT produce serous fluids There are two layers: 1. Parietal – the outermost layer, surrounds the cavity
2. Visceral – the innermost layer, surrounds the organ(s)
The subdivisions 1 Visceral/parietal pleura; pleural cavity (line lungs)
3. Visceral/parietal pericardium; pericardial cavity (line heart)
4. Visceral /parietal peritoneum; peritoneal cavity (line abdomen) Greater and lesser omentum: folds of peritoneum that extend from the stomach; for  protection this perineum is visceral peritoneum; lesser omentum suspends the peritoneum and 
the greater omentum continues from the lesser omentum; omentum is connective tissue and 
includes adipose tissue  Mesenteries: double folds of peritoneum that connect the parietal peritoneum with the visceral peritoneum.; Mesenteries wrap around bowel; mesenteries hold bowel so it doesn’t drop
and sit on the bladder and other body parts; this peritoneum is parietal peritoneum 
C. Synovial membranes – produce synovial fluid – fluid within certain joints Composed entirely of connective tissue – the exception to the rule that body cavities are lined  by epithelium D. Cutaneous membrane – the skin X. Intercellular junctions: found on lateral sides of epithelial cells A. Zonula occludens or tight junctions: protein molecules in adjacent cell  membranes fuse together like a zipper, forming an impermeable barrier, which keeps 
molecules from passing between cells; e.g., the digestive tract
Don’t confuse with zonula adherens: an anchoring junction which bind to the cytoskeletons of  adjacent cells B. Desmosomes: Anchoring junctions, mechanical couplings like rivets scattered along  the sides of adjacent cells. More significant than adhesive belt junctions. Found in 
tissues under mechanical stress, like the heart, skin, uterus.
4
background image C. Gap junctions: allows chemical to pass between adjacent cells. Gap junctions exist  in electrically excitable tissues like the heart and smooth muscle, where passage of ions
from one cell to another helps to synchronize the cells together.
Vocabulary (be able to define, use, or give examples of) Anatomy Cell
Tissue
Organ
Organ system
Superior
Inferior: 
Anterior
Posterior
Ventral
Dorsal
Medial
Lateral:
Proximal
Distal:
Ipsilateral
Contralateral
Flexion Extension Adduction
Abduction
Inversion
Eversion
Dorsiflexion
Plantar flexion
Supination 
Pronation
Circumduction
Retraction
Protraction
Elevation
Depression
Lateral flexion
Cephalic
Cervical
Thoracic Brachium Antebrachium
Antecubital
Carpus
Pubis
Inguinal
Lumbar
Gluteus
Femur
Patella
Crus
Talus
Plantar
Hypochondriac
Iliac
Epigastric
Umbilical
Hypogastric Parietal Visceral
Peritoneum
Pleura
Pericardium
Perineum
Umbilicus
Mediastinum
Epi-
Hypo-
Gastro-
Osteo-
Chondro-
Hyper-
Peri-
Histology
Pathology
Matrix 5
background image  Introduction to Epithelial Tissues I General D. Epithelium covers and lines:  The skin  The coverings of the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive system. It 
covers the walls and organs of the ventral body cavity
Names/types 1. Epithelium: (outer); skin, mucous membranes
2. Mesothelium: (middle); covers visceral organs and lines body cavities
3. Endothelium: (inner); lines inner walls of blood and lymphatic vessels E. Glandular: epithelium makes up the majority of the glands of the body Exocrine glands: secretions pass through ducts
Endocrine glands: ductless glands that secrete hormones directly into the blood or lymphatic 
fluid Functions: -Protect (dehydration, abrasion, destruction by physical, chemical or biological agents) -Absorb
-Filter
-Selective permeability 
-
Excrete/Secrete
-Sensory reception (its in your ears, nose, eyes, parts of skin and works with nervous  tissues to facilitate nerve action) XI. Characteristics of Epithelium Covering and lining epithelia can be classified by a number of different morphologic characteristics. These 
include the presence of a basement membrane, the number of cell layers of the tissue, and the shape of the 
cell
A. Cellularity: composed of closely packed cells, with little extracellular material (or  matrix ). Cells are bound closely together by intercellular junctions.   B. Polarity: have an apical surface (exposed to external environment) and basal surface (exposed to internal environment– next to a  basement membrane ) Apical specializations 1. Microvilli: fingerlike extensions of the cell that increases the ability to absorb or secrete – kidney tubules, intestinal tract 2. Cilia: propel substances along their free surface, like the trachea C. Attachment:  Basement membrane:  underlying supportive material; made by both  the epithelium and connective tissue  Basal lamina: a thin, supportive sheet of non-cellular glycoproteins that lies adjacent to the basal  surface of the epithelium
Reticular lamina: deep to the basal lamina and is a network of collagen protein fibers that are 
part of the underlying connective tissue D. Innervated – have nerve fibers to detect changes in the environment at a particular  body or organ surface region  E. Avascular – lack blood vessels; obtain nutrients either directly across the apical  surface or by diffusion across the basal surface from connective tissue F. Regenerate rapidly—frequently damaged or lost by abrasion; can be replaced as  fast as they are lost 6
background image XII. Specific Types of Epithelium A. Classification Based in part on number of cell layers Simple: a single cell layer; all cells are in direct contact with basement membrane  (1) Since it is thin, it is concerned with absorption, secretion, and filtration, but not  protection. Located in: kidney tubules, linings of the air sacs in lungs, intestines, blood vessels  Stratified: consists of 2 or more cell layers stacked on each other; only the cells in the deepest 
(basal) layer are in contact with basement membrane
(2) Found where protection is important.  (3) They regenerate from the basal layer and push apically as they mature (from bottom  to the top) Located in: top layer of skin, internal lining of esophagus, pharynx or vagina  Pseudostratified Simple: the cells are only a single layer thick, but the cells vary in height and 
have nuclei located at different levels from the basement membrane, giving the appearance that it 
is several layers thick. Will not contain distinct layers.  Located in: Lines nasal cavity, respiratory epithelium which has cilia, also found in male  urethra Based in part on cell shape Squamous: flattened laterally with sparse cytoplasm and somewhat irregular in shape.  The close fitting, scale-like cells resemble a tiled floor. 2. Columnar: tall and column shaped; nucleus is oval 
3. Cuboidal: are boxlike, about as tall as wide; nucleus is spherical and centered
B. Simple epithelia – every cell touches the basement membrane Simple squamous epithelia: 1 layer of flattened cells. Found where filtration or exchange is a priority; extremely delicate and highly
specialized to allow rapid movement of molecules across its surface by
diffusion, osmosis or filtration. Found only in protected regions where
most surfaces reduce friction or abrasion. Found in amnion—inner layer
of membrane around the embryo  1. Mesothelium is the epithelium found in serous membranes lining the ventral body cavity 2. Endothelium lines the lumen of blood and lymphatic vessels as well as the cardiovascular system Simple cuboidal epithelia: 1 layer of cubed cells. Functions primarily to absorb fluids and other 
substances across its apical membrane and to secrete specific molecules. Located in kidney 
tubules where it reabsorbs nutrients, ions and water that are
filtered out of the blood plasma; forms the ducts of exocrine glands
and covers the surface of ovaries Simple columnar epithelia: 1 layer of tall, narrow cells. Found
where absorption and secretion are important. Located in the
linings of the stomach and intestinal tract. 2 types—ciliated and 
nonciliated
Ciliated simple columnar epithelium: goblet cells may be present; function—secretion of mucin and movement of mucus 7

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Colorado Denver who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Colorado Denver
Department: Biology
Course: Human Anatomy
Professor: Kent Nofsinger
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: EXAM 1 STUDY GUIDE
Description: These notes cover exam 1. Pictures are included.
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
59 Pages 83 Views 66 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Recommended Documents
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CU Denver - BIOL 3244 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CU Denver - BIOL 3244 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here