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UC - GEOG 1001 - Class Notes - Week 4

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UC - GEOG 1001 - Class Notes - Week 4

School: University of Cincinnati
Department: Geography
Course: Introduction to Physical Geography
Professor: Nicholas Dunning
Term: Summer 2016
Tags: climate and climate change
Name: GEOG 1001 9.16.16
Description: Lecture notes from 9.16.16. Include the possible test/quiz questions
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
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background image Introduction to Physical 
Geography
9.16.16 Climate Regions Part 2 Continental Climates (D) Found only in the Northern Hemisphere, 40° to 70° Located in Zone of Westerlies, MLCZ, daily weather Wave cyclone precipitation in autumn, winter & spring; convectional in 
summer
Humid Continental Climates (Dfa/b and Dwa/b) Long hot-warm summers, cool winters Source region of large streams Deciduous forest vegetation Subarctic with very cold winter only in NE Asia, Korea, N China (monsoon and 
Siberian High)
Hot, humid in mid-NoAm (Toledo), Great Plains to New England New York, Moscow Subarctic (Boreal Forest) Climate (Dfc/d and Dwc/d) Short, cool summers, long cold winters Marked continental influence, low precipitation (5-20”) as cP dominates Low evaporation, snow cover 5-7 month Most extensive D climate: Alaska  Newfoundland, Finland  Siberia Boreal forest vegetation, taiga, “green sea” Churchill Canada and Verkhoyansk Russia QUIZ QUESTION #21: Which of the following climate regions experiences the 
greatest change in monthly average temperature (temperature change from month 
to month)?
Subarctic/Boreal Forest Climate Polar (E) Climates Found at high latitudes or high altitudes Very dry, little evaporation Covers 17% of land area Tundra Climate (ET) No true summer precipitation low, mostly in summer (wave cyclones); evapotranspiration 
even lower
Tundra vegetation; “Barrens” Also found at high altitudes; above “tree line”
background image Characterized by permafrost QUIZ QUESTION #22: Which of the following is NOT true about a Tundra Climate 
region?
They are found mainly in the Southern Hemisphere Ice Sheet Climate (EF) Greenland and Antarctica (9% land area today) dominated by Polar High  World record low temp: -127 ° F, Antarctica Also found at high altitudes on alpine glaciers Dry/Arid (B) Climates Covers 30% of land area; most of all climates Conditions that favor development of B climate** o Continued presence of subsiding air (STH)
o Extreme continental conditions in mid-latitudes
o Leeward side of mountain range (rain shadow)
o Cold offshore ocean currents
Characteristics o Evaporation is greater that precipitation
o clear skies, low humidity
o large diurnal temp range
o convectional precipitation, very sporadic
o natural vegetation sparse, specialized
Low – Latitude Deserts and Steppes (BWh and BSh) Under influence of STH pressure belt Sahara, Saudi Arabia, Kalahari, Sonora, Australia Cold offshore currents Namib, Atacama Highest absolute temp: 136° F (Libya), max 1-day temp range (100 ° F) 
Algeria
BW vegetation sparse and highly specialized (cacti, roots) BS is short grasses, widely spaced Cold Deserts and Steppes (BWk and BSk) higher latitude or altitude Often mid-latitude rain shadow or extreme continental position Precipitation is convectional or frontal (MLCZ) North America:  o Intermontane: Between Cascades – South Nevada and Rockies, largely  rain shadow, colder with altitude and latitude o Great Plains: BS prevails.  Precipitation decreases South to North,  temperature decreases South to North. Temperature increases West to 
East and precipitation increases West to East

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School: University of Cincinnati
Department: Geography
Course: Introduction to Physical Geography
Professor: Nicholas Dunning
Term: Summer 2016
Tags: climate and climate change
Name: GEOG 1001 9.16.16
Description: Lecture notes from 9.16.16. Include the possible test/quiz questions
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
3 Pages 20 Views 16 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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