Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

TTU - CHEM 1307 - Class Notes - Week 4

Created by: Kyle A. Headen Elite Notetaker

> > > > TTU - CHEM 1307 - Class Notes - Week 4

TTU - CHEM 1307 - Class Notes - Week 4

School: Texas Tech University
Department: Chemistry
Course: Experimental Principles of Chemistry 1
Professor: Tamara Hanna
Term: Fall 2015
Tags: Chemistry
Name: CHEM 1307 Chapter 3
Description: Overall Idea Highlighted Materials that help you study on for Midterm exam 1 and overall concept you will need to remember for Midterm Exam 2
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
0 5 3 72 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 8 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Chapter 3- Notes    Formula:    An element is a substance that is made up of only one type of atom (each of which has the same 
number of protons). 
  A compound is a substance that contains atoms of more than one element.    A pure substance can be either an element or a compound.    Ex:                                                  Ex 2:  Gold or Au is an element.          Hydrogen Peroxide will be created - H2O2         It can be made up of a continuous network of atoms all held together by strong bonds,   or   it can exist as individual groups of atoms that form identical particles called molecules, in which the 
atoms are held together by strong bonds but the molecules interact with each other only weakly.   
Ex: O3 or Ozone is a type of molecule  A molecular formula lists the number of atoms of each element that are in a single molecule.       Example:    N2 is the molecular formula for the most common form of the element nitrogen, which exists as 
identical particles, each of which contains two atoms of nitrogen. 
  For substances that are made up of atoms that form a continuous network, the chemical formula lists 
the smallest whole number ratio of the atoms of each element.  This is called an empirical  formula. 
     
background image *Empirical  Formula Vs Molecular Formula  Ex A: Empirical Formula of                                                                            Ex B: Molecular Formula  CH or C1H1        Hydrocarbon                                                                       C6H6 or Benzene    Ionic Compounds:  Atoms of elements on the right of the periodic table tend to gain electrons to form anions.  Atoms of elements on the left of the periodic table tend to lose electrons to form cations.  Atoms on the far left and far right of the periodic table tend to gain or lose electrons so that they have 
the same number as a neutral noble gas. 
Group 1 = 1+ ion charge or 1 valence electrons total (Li, Na, K and etc. in Group 1A)  Group 2 = 2+ ion charge or 2 valence electrons total (Be, Mg, Ca and etc. in Group 2A)  Group 13 = 3+ ion charge or 3 valence electrons total (B, Al, Ga and etc. in Group 3A)  Group 14 = 4+ or -4 ion charge or 4 valence electrons total (C, Si, Ge and etc. in group 4A)  Group 15 = -3 ion charge or 5 valence electrons total (N, P, As, and etc. with group 5A)  Group 16 = -2 ion charge or 6 valence electrons total (O, S, Se and etc. within group 6A)  Group 17 = -1 ion charge or 7 electrons valence total (F, Cl, Br, I and etc. within group 7A)   Group 18 = 0 ion charge or noble gases or 8 electrons valence total also Full Valence is complete. 
(including He or Helium, Ne, Ar, Kr, and etc. in Group 8A.) 
  Atoms in Group 1 lose one electron to form cations with a 1+ charge. 
  Atoms in Group 2 lose two electrons to form cations with a 2+ charge. 
  Atoms in Group 17 gain one electron to form anions with a 1- charge. 
  Atoms in Group 16 gain two electrons to form anions with a 2- charge. 
Ionic compounds are made up of both cations and anions, and the number of positive charges must 
equal the number of negative charges. 
Ex:   NaCl or Na+ = Positive Sodium Ion Cl- = Negative Chlorine Ion or Sodium Chloride (aka) Table Salt is an 
ionic compound. 
Transition metals and main group metals are located in the center of the periodic chart, far from the 
noble gases.  It is very difficult to add or remove a large number of electrons from a single atom, and so 
these metals generally have a low positive charge in their ionic compounds (1+, 2+, or 3+). 
Many transition metals and main group metals can form several ions that have different charges, 
depending upon the compound. 
background image Iron (Fe) can form Fe2+ ions or Fe3+ ions.    Polyatomic ions are made up of clusters of atoms that have an overall charge.  Polyatomic ions are made up of clusters of atoms that have an overall charge.    NH4+ is the ammonium ion.  SO42- is the sulfate ion.    (*Memorize the names, formulas, and charges of all of the 
polyatomic ions in Table 3.5 on p. 99.) 
Naming Ionic Compounds:  For purposes of naming only, all metals are usually treated as cations.  For purposes of naming only, an ionic compound is any combination of a metal or a known cation (such 
as NH4+) with a nonmetal or a known anion (such as NO3-).   
An element on the far left or far right of the periodic chart forms the same ion in almost all of its 
compounds (eg. Na almost always exists as Na+ in a compound, Ca forms Ca2+, Cl forms Cl-, etc.). 
Elements in the center of the periodic chart can form a variety of ions (Fe can exist as Fe2+ or Fe3+; Sn 
as Sn2+ or Sn4+; etc.) 
The name of the cation is always given first and the anion is last.  For cations that always have the same charge:  Write the name of the cation and the name of the anion.  If the cation is a metal, use the name of the metal.  If the anion is a single nonmetal, use the ending "-ide"     (eg. chloride for Cl-, oxide for O2-, etc.)  For metal cations that do not always have the same charge:  Write the name of the metal cation, followed by a Roman numeral in parentheses to show the charge 
on the cation, and then the name of the anion. 
Use the known charge on the anion to determine the charge on the metal cation.    Ex:  

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Texas Tech University who use StudySoup to get ahead
8 Pages 21 Views 16 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Texas Tech University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Texas Tech University
Department: Chemistry
Course: Experimental Principles of Chemistry 1
Professor: Tamara Hanna
Term: Fall 2015
Tags: Chemistry
Name: CHEM 1307 Chapter 3
Description: Overall Idea Highlighted Materials that help you study on for Midterm exam 1 and overall concept you will need to remember for Midterm Exam 2
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
8 Pages 21 Views 16 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to TTU - CHEM 1307 - Class Notes - Week 4
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to TTU - CHEM 1307 - Class Notes - Week 4

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here