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Long Beach State - ART 221 - Class Notes - Week 4

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Long Beach State - ART 221 - Class Notes - Week 4

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background image THEA 221: History of Theatre and Drama to 1600 Medea by Euripides Notes ­ BCE before the common era, AD after death. ­ He had OCD, a sense of historical chronicling was important to him. ­ This play is deemed as the goriest play of all. ­ We are fascinated with this elimated of matricide. ­ He taking this myth of Medea and tempting the gods. ­ Most of the bloodiest messiest scenes happen off stage. ­ He starts the play with a figure of a female nurse. ­ He creates a chorus of Corinthian women as an indicator of an absence of women and  more of a male force. ­ Medea was victimized. ­ Style, polemical.  ­ Medea is Euripides oldest tragedies. ­ Euripides: ­ Born: c. 480, Died: d. 406, Lived to be around 74. ­ The name Euripides derived from the Greek elements EU “Good” and “Throw, Swing”. ­ Euripides wasn’t as major a competitor as Sophocles. ­ Won 4 competitions at the Festival of Dionysus. He did not compete at Dionysia until he was 40 years old. ­ He was born wealthy, but didn’t use his wealth as a platform to catapult him into public  life. ­ Strange luck preserves legacy: ­ Euripides’ body of work is the greatest survivor of all the tragedians across time. ­ This is attributed to happenstance. ­ Innovation and Controversy:  ­ Euripides was hailed by many as a great innovator of the dramatic/tragic form. But by  others, he was deemed as its killer.
background image ­ Medea: ­ Greek name for “to think, to plan”. ­ Medea is the protagonist of the play. She is from an Island located in the Black seas  named Colchis. She is a sorceress and a princess. Medea looks for revenge of her 
husband leaving her by killing Creon, Glauce, and her own children in order to make 
Jason suffer for leaving her.
­ This play shocked and disturbed audiences. Which might have cost him the Dionysian  prize in 431 B.C.E.. Because of its gory murderous ending. ­ This play has been adopted by later play versions, Operas and Ballets across time, in  Greece, Europe, and the U.S.. ­ There has been three contemporary 20 th  and 21 st  century outstanding renditions of the  plays characters. ­ Euripides earlier renditions of the myth have been lost. ­ This play pushes the limits of conflict and drama. ­ Jason: ­ Greek name for “Healer/Cure.”  ­ Jason is Medea’s husband. He met her on his trip to find the gold fleece. ­ They procreated two sons Naïve and Oblivious.  ­ Jason decides to marry Glauce, the daughter of King Creon. He believes by marrying  Glauce he would give a better life to his two sons. ­ Unfortunately for Jason, Medea kills Glauce, Creon, and his two sons for revenge. ­ Children: ­ Naïve and Oblivious, are the two sons of Medea and Jason. ­ Naïve stands for “innocent” and Oblivious stands for “Unaware/Unconscious” in Greek. ­ Medea uses them as a plan to kill Glaucen. After that, their own mother kills them as  part of her revenge to Jason.  ­ This part of the play can be considered the Pathos/Sadness moment of the play. ­ Creon: 2

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School: California State University Long Beach
Department: Art
Course: History of Theatre and Drama to 1600
Professor: Jaye Williams
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: theatre, THEA221, theatrehistory, and drama
Name: THEA 221, Week 4 Notes
Description: These notes cover the play Medea By Euripides that where on Friday's Exam.
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
4 Pages 15 Views 12 Unlocks
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