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CHEM 1211 - Class Notes - Week 4

Created by: Sayali Punyarthi Elite Notetaker

CHEM 1211 - Class Notes - Week 4

School: Georgia Institute of Technology - Main Campus
Department: Chemistry
Course: Chemical Principles I
Professor: Angus Wilkinson
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Chemistry
Name: General Chemistry Review
Description: These notes contain a review of the basics of chemistry needed to further develop the content later on through the course.
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
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background image Chapter 1: General Chemistry John Dalton’s Theory: o Elements are composed of atoms
o All atoms in a given element are identical
o Atoms of one element are different than atoms of another element
o Atoms are neither create nor destroyed in chemical reactions
o Compounds are formed when atoms of more than one element chemically 
combine Classification of Matter o States of Matter Solids, liquids, gases, and aqueous solutions o Pure substances are either elements or compounds  Aqueous: dissolved in water Elements cannot be decomposed into simpler parts  Compounds are made of 2 or more elements.  o Mixtures Heterogeneous v. Homogenous Heterogeneous: does not have the same properties, appearance 
or composition throughout
Homogenous: solutions, elements, and compounds Properties and Changes of Matter o Physical Properties can be observed without changing the identity or  composition.  Color, odor, harness, etc.  o Chemical properties describe how a substance can change Flammability, reactivity o Physical changes: changes appearance NO composition  Ripping, evaporating, boiling, squeezing, cutting o Chemical changes: changes to the composition. A new substance is created.  Burning, reacting, oxidizing  Law of Definite Proportions o Proust’s Law Stats that a chemical compound has a set proportion of elements by 
volume regardless of the amount of the compound
No matter what amount of water you have, there will always be a 
ration of hydrogen making up 1/9 of the mass whereas oxygen will 
make up 8/9 of the mass, whether the sample size is a drop of water or
a lake 
Law of Multiple Proportions o When elements combine, they combine in a ration of small whole numbers  Especially important for elements that can combine to form more than 
one type of compound
Molecules  o Molecules; specific combination of 2 or more atoms bound tightly together
o Chemical formula: uses chemical symbols and subscripts to show that 
elements are in the compound o Diatomic molecule: made of just 2 atoms (exists naturally in the state); Br, I,  C,Cl,H, O,F

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School: Georgia Institute of Technology - Main Campus
Department: Chemistry
Course: Chemical Principles I
Professor: Angus Wilkinson
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Chemistry
Name: General Chemistry Review
Description: These notes contain a review of the basics of chemistry needed to further develop the content later on through the course.
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
2 Pages 4 Views 3 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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