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UGA - PBHL 1710 - Class Notes - Week 5

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UGA - PBHL 1710 - Class Notes - Week 5

School: University of Georgia
Department: Public Health
Course: Health and Wellness
Professor: Lindsay White
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: health, wellness, healthy, hprb1710, uga, nutrition, Lecture Notes, and week5
Name: HPRB 1710 Week 5 Notes
Description: Notes on the "Fed Up" film and nutrition lecture (with important added information)
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 13 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image   HPRB 1710 
Week 5 Notes  
“Fed Up” Film & Nutrition Lecture    14 September 2016  “Fed Up” Film  Exercise May Not Be the Best Weight Loss Solution 
Between the 1980s (the height of America’s Jane Fonda/aerobics/jazzercise 
obsession) and 2000, fitness club memberships doubled)–but so did 
obesity rates. Now experts are questioning whether the age-old “calories in, 
calories out” philosophy is really accurate. As author Gary Taubes puts it, 
“We’re not going to exercise our way out of the obesity epidemic.” 
All Calories Are Not Created Equal 
As we learn in the film, 160 calories worth of almonds come with a healthy 
dose of fiber, which slows digestion and keeps blood sugar levels from 
spiking. 160 calories worth of soda, however, are absorbed straight into the 
liver, causing a “sugar rush” and the immediate conversion of sugar to fat. 
Both options are 160 calories, but they create drastically different reactions 
within the body. 
 Childhood Cases of Type 2 Diabetes Have Exploded 
Type 2 diabetes, once known as “adult onset diabetes” was virtually 
unheard of in children just a few decades ago. In 1980, there were zero 
childhood cases of the condition. In 2010, there were 57,636. 
        1  
background image       The 1977 McGovern Report Was a Food Industry Game Changer 
When Senator George McGovern recommended Americans consume less 
sugar and fat-laden products, the egg, sugar, and meat industries were less 
than thrilled. They banded together and rejected the statements. The 
recommendations were then rewritten to encourage consumers to buy 
more lean products as opposed to less of the rich ones. The food industry 
adapted by reengineering thousands of products to be low-fat. 
“Fat-Free” Comes at a Cost 
When you remove fat from food, you have a big problem: The food tastes 
horrible. To compensate for the lack of flavor, food manufacturers add 
plenty of sugar. Some products that are labeled “low-fat” actually contain 
twice the sugar of the original, full-fat versions. 
No Matter What It’s Called, It’s Still Sugar 
Sugar has tons of other monikers, and the body processes them all the 
same way. Whether you see “sugar,” “high-fructose corn syrup,” “fructose,” 
“dextrose,” “turbinado sugar,” “sorbitol,” “raw sugar,” or some other 
variation on the label–it’s still sugar. 
Sugar Shows Up in Sneaky Places 
The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 6 to 8 
teaspoons of sugar per day (1 teaspoon equals 4 grams). Even if you’re not 
pouring the sweet stuff on your cereal, it shows up in sneaky places like 
spaghetti sauce and salad dressing (both can contain about 3 teaspoons 
per serving). A breakfast of orange juice and processed cereal can put you 
over the daily limit in one meal. 
Sugar is a Drug 
Brain scans indicate that sugar consumption fires up the same areas of the 
brain that are triggered by cocaine, and according to Dr. Mark Hyman, it’s 
eight times as addictive as the narcotic. 
       
background image        Junk Food Qualifies as Health Food in Schools 
French fries and pizza are currently considered “vegetables” in school 
lunches. 
 You Can Be Thin on the Outside and Carry Dangerous Fat Inside 
The long-term damage of processed food consumption isn’t always visible. 
The acronym “TOFI” stands for “Thin Outside Fat Inside” and refers to 
individuals who seemingly “get away” with eating whatever they want but 
are hiding dangerous amounts of fat inside their bodies. 
(​ http://www.onemedical.com/blog/newsworthy/fed-up-movie/​ 16 September 2016   Chapter 8: Nutrition  Textbook Key Takeaways  8.1  Food is chemically complex. Nutrients are broken into 
macronutrients (water, carbohydrates, protein, and fat) and 
micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). 
Carbohydrates provide energy (4 calories per gram) and should 
make up between 45 and 65 percent of your daily calories. Healthy 
sources include fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. These foods will 
provide simple and complex carbohydrates, including fiber. Restrict 
foods high in refined carbohydrates and added sugars. 
Proteins provide building blocks for structural components of our 
bodies, as well as enzymes, antibodies, and neurotransmitters. The 
energy contained in protein is 4 calories per gram. Between 10 and 
35 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. Animal 
foods provide complete proteins. Plant foods are incomplete 
proteins. Combining some vegetables and grains completes the 
number of essential amino acids. 
   
background image       Fats are lipids, a chemical family that also includes cholesterol. We 
consume most of our fats as triglycerides, which are made of a 
glycerol molecule and 3 fatty acids. The number of carbons, 
saturation of the carbons, and shape of the fatty acids determine its 
properties and actions in the body. 
Fatty acids can be divided into saturated and unsaturated. Saturated 
fatty acids come mainly from animal foods. Unsaturated fatty acids 
are either monounsaturated or polyunsaturated. Polyunsaturated 
fatty acids are further subdivided into omega-3 and omega-6 fatty 
acids. 
Most trans fatty acids are formed through hydrogenation, a process 
in which hydrogen atoms are added to polyunsaturated fatty acids. 
Trans fatty acids can negatively affect human health. In particular, 
they raise the risk of cardiovascular disease. 
Micronutrients can be divided into vitamins (organic molecules) and 
minerals (inorganic molecules). Vitamins are further divided into 
water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins. Major minerals are needed 
in larger amounts than trace minerals. 
Plants contain other healthy substances such as carotenoids and 
flavonoids. 
The Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board establishes 
Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), guidelines for recommended 
dietary intakes for nutrients. 
8.2  The shift from small farms to large-scale agriculture and food 
processing created an abundance of inexpensive food. 
Unfortunately, many of these practices harmed the environment 
and human health. 
For good nutrition, eat real food: unprocessed fruits, vegetables, and 
meats. Let fruits and vegetables make up at least 50 percent of 
every meal. 
 

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Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Georgia who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Georgia
Department: Public Health
Course: Health and Wellness
Professor: Lindsay White
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: health, wellness, healthy, hprb1710, uga, nutrition, Lecture Notes, and week5
Name: HPRB 1710 Week 5 Notes
Description: Notes on the "Fed Up" film and nutrition lecture (with important added information)
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
13 Pages 23 Views 18 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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