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UWEC - SOC 101 - Class Notes - Soc 101: Week 1- Reading and Lecture

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UWEC - SOC 101 - Class Notes - Soc 101: Week 1- Reading and Lecture

School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Sociology
Course: Intro to Sociology
Professor: Jeff Erger
Term: Spring 2016
Tags: Introduction to Sociology
Name: Soc 101: Week 1- Reading and Lecture Notes
Description: The reading notes are on Chapters 1 and 2 and cover each individual section's key terms and points. This document also contains the first day of lecture notes, covering Theory and Metatheory.
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
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background image Week 1: Reading Notes  Chapter 1:   1.1  Explain how the sociological perspective differs from common sense.  Sociology: ​ is the systematic study of human society  Sociological perspective: ​ seeing the general patterns of society in the lives of particular people   
They differ because common sense says that we do things because that’s what we want to do, 
however sociological perspective states that we do things instead because we are influenced by 
the society surrounding us.  
 
1.2
  State several reasons that a global perspective is important in today’s world.   Global perspective: ​ the study of the larger world and society’s place in it  1. Logical extension of the sociological perspective; the position of our society in the larger  world system affects everyone in the US  2. High­income, middle­income, low­income  a. Where we live shapes the lives we lead  
b. Societies throughout the world are increasingly interconnected (through 
technology.) Rich countries have cultural impacts on poorer countries  c. What happens in the rest of the world affects life in the US; growing economies  around the world has negatively impacted ours   d. Many social problems that we face in the US are far more serious elsewhere  (poverty, gender inequality)   e. Thinking globally helps us learn more about ourselves    1.3   Identify the advantages of sociological thinking for developing public policy, for encouraging  personal growth, and for advancing in a career. 
 
Public Policy: 
Sociologists have helped create laws and regulations that guide how people in communities live 
and work. 
Ex: Noticed women who get divorced experience dramatic loss of income, so the  states passed a law that increases women’s claims to marital property. 
 
Personal Growth: 
Likely to become more active and aware. 
1. Helps assess the truth of common sense.  Ex: If we think we decide our own fate, we  might be quick to praise the successful and look down upon the unsuccessful, even 
though it’s not even their fault.  
2. Helps to see the opportunities and constraints in our lives; helps pursue goals more  effectively.  3. Helps us live in a diverse world; encourages us to think critically about the relative  strengths and weaknesses of all ways of life, including our own.   
background image Advancing in Career: 
Success depends on understanding how various categories of people differ in beliefs, family 
patterns, and other ways of life because almost every job involves working with other people.  
 
1.4
 Link the origins of sociology to historical social changes.  1. New industrial economy­ the change in system of production took people out of their  homes weakening the traditions that had guided community life for centuries.  2. Growth of cities­ urban migrants faced pollution, crime, homelessness, and moving  through the streets crowded by strangers which was a huge change from living on farms  3. Political change­ shift in focus from a moral obligation to God and King to the pursuit of  self interest (due to growth of cities.)  4. A new awareness of society­ huge factories, exploding cities, and new sprint of  individualism combined to make people more aware of their surroundings    Auguste Comte coined the term sociology in 1838  Comte’s Three Stages of Society: Theological Stage­ church, Metaphysical­ 
Enlightenment and ideas of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau, and Scientific Stage­ 
modern physics, chemistry, and sociology 
Positivism: Comte’s approach to knowledge based on positive facts as opposed to mere 
speculation 
 
1.5
 Summarize sociology’s major theoretical approaches.  Theoretical approach: ​ a basic image of society that guides thinking and research  1. Structural Functional Approach: ​ a framework for building theory that sees society as a  complex system whose parts work together to promote solidarity and stability  a. Social structure: stable pattern of social behavior; gives our lives shape in  families, workplace, classroom, and the community  b. Social functions: consequences of pattern for the operation of society as a whole  i. Manifest functions­ recognized/intended  ii. Latent functions­ unrecognized/unintended  c. Social dysfunction­ pattern that disrupts the operation of society (the downfall)  2. Social Conflict Approach:  ​a framework for building theory that sees society as an area  of inequality that generates conflict and change  a. Gender conflict­ focuses on inequality and conflict between men and women 
b. Race conflict­ focuses on inequality and conflict between people of different race 
3. Symbolic Interaction Approach:  ​framework for building theory that sees society as the  product of the everyday interactions of individuals (micro­orientation)  The difference between structural­functional and social conflict is that a conflict analysis rejects 
the idea that social structure promotes the operation of society as a whole, focusing instead on 
how social patterns benefit some people while hurting others.  
 

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School: University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire
Department: Sociology
Course: Intro to Sociology
Professor: Jeff Erger
Term: Spring 2016
Tags: Introduction to Sociology
Name: Soc 101: Week 1- Reading and Lecture Notes
Description: The reading notes are on Chapters 1 and 2 and cover each individual section's key terms and points. This document also contains the first day of lecture notes, covering Theory and Metatheory.
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
6 Pages 20 Views 16 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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