×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide

Created by: Tara Mattimiro Elite Notetaker

Schools > Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University > Chemistry > CHEM 1035 > Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide

Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide

0 5 3 70 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 16 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image GENERAL CHEMISTRY: CHAPTER 1  08/23/2016        GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1035   
INTRO 
Chemistry:
 Study of matter, its properties, the changes that matter undergoes, and the energy 
associated with those changes 
Matter: Anything that has a mass and occupies volume 
Measurements:  
1.  Numerical Value 
2.  Units 
3.  Estimation of error  
Priestley: Believed in the phlogiston theory 
Lavoisier: Accurate measurement, on the part of Lavoisier, lead to the demise of phlogiston theory 
𝐻𝑔𝑂(𝑠) → ℎ𝑔(𝑚) + 1
2
𝑂 2 (𝑔)    He demonstrated that oxygen was an element   
UNITS 
Two Systems: 
English System &Metric System: 
Typical Units: 
  Length: Meter 
  Mass: The quantity of matter an object contains 
o  SI Units: kilogram (kg)    Volume: The amount of space any sample of  matter occupies   o  SI Units: cubic meter (𝑚 3 )    Time: “second”   
UNIT CONVERSIONS 
When converting from one unit to another, a conversion factor (a ration of equivalent quantities) is 
chosen and set up so that all units cancel except those required for the answer. 
 
Dimensional Analysis: Conversions where units cancel 
  Example Problem: I have 62.5g of liquid 𝑁 2 . What is its mass in pounds?  ?  𝑙𝑏𝑠 = 62.5𝑔 ∗   1 𝑘𝑔 1000𝑔 1 𝑙𝑏 0.4536𝑘𝑔 = 0.138𝑙𝑏    𝑂𝑅   62.5𝑔 ∗ 1𝑙𝑏 453.6𝑔 = 0.138𝑙𝑏    Example Problem: An ostrich can run at 45 mi/hr. What is this speed in m/min   𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑒𝑑 = 𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑢𝑡𝑒 = 45.0𝑚𝑖 1 ℎ𝑟 ∗   1 ℎ𝑟 60 𝑚𝑖𝑛 1. .609 𝑘𝑚 1 𝑚𝑖 1000𝑚 1 𝑘𝑚 = 1207 𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑠/𝑚𝑖𝑛   
Density: Ratio of mass to volume 
𝑑 =   𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑠 𝑣𝑜𝑙𝑢𝑚𝑒     Density is a conversion factor between mass and volume   
background image   Example Problem – Unit Conversion with Density 
What volume does 62.5g of liquid N2 occupy? The density of liquid N2 is 0.808g/mL 
𝑉𝑜𝑙𝑢𝑚𝑒 𝑚𝐿 = 62.5𝑔 ∗ 1 𝑚𝐿 0.808𝑔 = 77.4𝑚𝐿    Example Problem – The density of liquid N 2  is 0.808g/mL. Convert the density of liquid N2 to  lb/ft 3  (1 mL = 1cm 3 ; 1 lb = 0.4536 kg; 1 in = 2.54 cm)  0.808 𝑔 1 𝑚𝐿 ∗   1 𝑘𝑔 1000 𝑔 1 𝑙𝑏 0.4536 𝑘𝑔 1 𝑚𝐿 1 𝑐𝑚 3 ∗ ( 2.54 𝑐𝑚 1 𝑖𝑛 ) 3 ∗ ( 12 𝑖𝑛  1 𝑓𝑡 ) 3 = 50.4  𝑙𝑏 𝑓𝑡 3       Example Problem:   Fueling stop - The dipstick indicated a volume of 7682 L of fuel in the tank.  A  mass of 22,300 kg of fuel is required for the trip (fuel need is calculate by mass) 
 
o  Mechanics used a density of 1.77 kg/L to convert between L and kg: 
o  Mass of fuel in tank: 
7682𝐿 ∗ 1.77𝑘𝑔 𝐿 = 13,600𝑘𝑔  o  Mass of fuel needed:  22,300𝑘𝑔 − 13,600𝑘𝑔 = 8,700𝑘𝑔  o  But the density is 1.77lb/L NOT kg/L  Density in kg/L:    𝑑𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑦 = 𝑘𝑔 𝐿 =   1.77𝑙𝑏 𝐿 0.4536𝑘𝑔 1𝑙𝑏 =   0.803𝑘𝑔 𝐿   o  Mass of fuel in tank:   7682𝐿 ∗ 0.803𝑘𝑔 𝐿 = 6,170𝑘𝑔  o  Mass of fuel needed:  22,300𝑘𝑔 − 6,170𝑘𝑔 = 16,130𝑘𝑔    Example Problem – Complex Unit Conversion  Gold can be hammered into very thin sheets called gold leaf.  A builder needs to cover a 100 ft x 
82 ft ceiling with gold leaf that is five millionths of an inch thick.  The density of gold is 19.32 
g/cm
3 , and gold costs $1418 per troy ounce (1 troy ounce = 31.1034768 g).  How much will it  cost for the builder to purchase the necessary gold?     (1 in = 2.54 cm)  100𝑓𝑡 ∗ 82𝑓𝑡 ∗ (5 ∗ 10 −6 )𝑖𝑛 ∗ 1𝑓𝑡 12𝑖𝑛 = 0.00342𝑓𝑡 3   $𝐶𝑜𝑠𝑡 = 0.00342𝑓𝑡 3 ∗ ( 12𝑖𝑛 1𝑓𝑡 ) 3 ∗ ( 2.54𝑐𝑚 1𝑖𝑛 ) 3 19.32𝑔 𝑐𝑚 3 1 𝑡𝑟𝑜𝑦 𝑜𝑧 31.1034768𝑔 $1418 𝑜𝑧 = $85,300   
PROPERTIES  
Intensive Properties: 
Independent of quantity 
  Density, Melting Point, Freezing Point, Boiling Point  Extensive Properties: Depend on mass or quantity     Mass, Volume, Heat, Length   
 
 
 
background image TEMPERATURE SCALES 
Fahrenheit (
o F):  Commonly used in the U.S.; water freezes at 32 o F and boils at 212 o F.  the Fahrenheit  scale has a different degree size and different zero points than the other two scales.    ℉ = 1. 8   𝐶 + 32     Celsius ( o C):  Scale used in science and around the world; water freezes at 0 o C and boils at 100 o C.       𝐶 =   (℉−32) 1.8   Kelvin (K):  The “Absolute temperature scale”; begins at absolute zero and has only positive values; 
water freezes at 273 K and boils at 373 K.  The Kelvin and Celsius scales use the same size degree but 
their starting points differ. 
    𝐾 =      𝐶 + 273.15    Example Problem – Temperature  Conversion  Liquid nitrogen has a boiling point of –196 o C.  What is this temperature in  o F and K?  ℉ = 1.8℉ °𝐶 − (−196°𝐶) + 32°𝐶 = −321℉       POLYMERS    Polymers undergo a phase change as a function of temperature called the glass transition  
  Temperatures below the glass-transition temperature of the polymer o-ring is listed as a major 
factor in the Challenger explosion disaster.    
UNCERTANITY OF MEASUREMENTS 
  Uncertainty due to: The precision of the measuring device, the accuracy of the observer 
  Every measurement includes some uncertainty.  The rightmost digit of any quantity is always 
estimated    The recorded digits, certain and uncertain, are called significant figures. 
  The greater the number of significant digits in a quantity, the greater its certainty. 
  A measurement is only as good as the measuring device 
 
SIGNIFICANT FIGURES 
  Any non-zero digit is significant. 
  Zeros between non-zero digits (captive zeros) are significant 
  Place holding zeros on the left of the first non-zero digit are not significant; these are only used 
to locate the decimal point.    Trailing zeros following a decimal point are significant. 
  Trailing zeros in a number without a decimal point are presumed to be placeholders and are not 
significant.  Examples:   o  100 - 1 significant figure  
o  100. - 3 significant figures 
o  100.0 - 4 significant figures 
o  0.04050 – 4 significant figures 
o  2090 – 3 significant figures 
o  3.040 x 10
4 –4 significant figures Exact Numbers: Defined quantities are precise and the concept of significant figures has no meaning for 
these. These include most conversion factors. Counted objects are treated similarly.  
  100 cm = 1m  
   1in = 2.54cm 
  Exact numbers do not limit the number of significant digits in a calculation  
background image Addition and Subtraction: The answer has the same number of decimal places as there are in the 
measurements with the fewest decimal places  
89.332 + 1. 1 = 90.4 |32  Multiplication and Division: The answer contains the same number of significant figures as in the 
measurement with the fewest significant figures 
134 ∗ 25 = 33 50 → 3400  Example Problem: If a steel Ball has a circumference of 32.5mm and weighs 4.20g, what is it’s density?  𝐶𝑖𝑟𝑐𝑢𝑚𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒 = 32.5 = 2𝜋𝑟  𝑟 = 5.172536  𝑉 =   4
3
𝜋𝑟 3 = 579.6944 𝑚𝑚 3   𝑑𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑦 = 4.20𝑔 579.6944 𝑚𝑚 3 ∗   (10𝑚𝑚) 3 1𝑐𝑚 3 = 7.25𝑐𝑚 3    
Precision: Range of measurements close in value, affected by systematic error 
  Systematic Error: Usually come from the measuring instruments  Accuracy: Close to true value, affected by random error    Random Error: Caused by unknown and unpredictable changes in the experiment  o  Measuring instruments 
o  Environmental conditions  
 
Rules for Rounding Off Numbers: 
1.  If the digit removed is more than 5, the preceding number increases by 1  o  Ex. 5.379 -> 5.38 -> 5.4  2.  If the digit removed is less than 5, the preceding number is unchanged  o  Ex.  0.2413 -> 0.241 -> 0.24  3.  If the digit removed is 5, the preceding number increased by 1 if it is odd and remains  unchanged if it is even  o  Ex. 17.75 -> 17.8 
o  Ex. 17.65 -> 17.6 
  If the 5 is followed only by zeros, rule 3 is followed; if the 5 is followed by non-zeros, rule 1 is  followed  o  Ex. 17.6500 -> 17.6 
o  Ex. 17.6513 -> 17.7 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Department: Chemistry
Course: General Chemistry
Professor: Hanson
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Chemistry, review, study, guide, 1035, virginia, and Tech
Name: General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide
Description: These notes cover chapters 1-3 in order to prepare for the first General Chemistry test
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
16 Pages 197 Views 157 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here