Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide

Created by: Tara Mattimiro Elite Notetaker

> > > > Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide

Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide

0 5 3 35 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 16 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image GENERAL CHEMISTRY: CHAPTER 1  08/23/2016        GENERAL CHEMISTRY 1035   
INTRO 
Chemistry:
 Study of matter, its properties, the changes that matter undergoes, and the energy 
associated with those changes 
Matter: Anything that has a mass and occupies volume 
Measurements:  
1.  Numerical Value 
2.  Units 
3.  Estimation of error  
Priestley: Believed in the phlogiston theory 
Lavoisier: Accurate measurement, on the part of Lavoisier, lead to the demise of phlogiston theory 
𝐻𝑔𝑂(𝑠) → ℎ𝑔(𝑚) + 1
2
𝑂 2 (𝑔)    He demonstrated that oxygen was an element   
UNITS 
Two Systems: 
English System &Metric System: 
Typical Units: 
  Length: Meter 
  Mass: The quantity of matter an object contains 
o  SI Units: kilogram (kg)    Volume: The amount of space any sample of  matter occupies   o  SI Units: cubic meter (𝑚 3 )    Time: “second”   
UNIT CONVERSIONS 
When converting from one unit to another, a conversion factor (a ration of equivalent quantities) is 
chosen and set up so that all units cancel except those required for the answer. 
 
Dimensional Analysis: Conversions where units cancel 
  Example Problem: I have 62.5g of liquid 𝑁 2 . What is its mass in pounds?  ?  𝑙𝑏𝑠 = 62.5𝑔 ∗   1 𝑘𝑔 1000𝑔 1 𝑙𝑏 0.4536𝑘𝑔 = 0.138𝑙𝑏    𝑂𝑅   62.5𝑔 ∗ 1𝑙𝑏 453.6𝑔 = 0.138𝑙𝑏    Example Problem: An ostrich can run at 45 mi/hr. What is this speed in m/min   𝑠𝑝𝑒𝑒𝑑 = 𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑒𝑟 𝑚𝑖𝑛𝑢𝑡𝑒 = 45.0𝑚𝑖 1 ℎ𝑟 ∗   1 ℎ𝑟 60 𝑚𝑖𝑛 1. .609 𝑘𝑚 1 𝑚𝑖 1000𝑚 1 𝑘𝑚 = 1207 𝑚𝑒𝑡𝑒𝑟𝑠/𝑚𝑖𝑛   
Density: Ratio of mass to volume 
𝑑 =   𝑚𝑎𝑠𝑠 𝑣𝑜𝑙𝑢𝑚𝑒     Density is a conversion factor between mass and volume   
background image   Example Problem – Unit Conversion with Density 
What volume does 62.5g of liquid N2 occupy? The density of liquid N2 is 0.808g/mL 
𝑉𝑜𝑙𝑢𝑚𝑒 𝑚𝐿 = 62.5𝑔 ∗ 1 𝑚𝐿 0.808𝑔 = 77.4𝑚𝐿    Example Problem – The density of liquid N 2  is 0.808g/mL. Convert the density of liquid N2 to  lb/ft 3  (1 mL = 1cm 3 ; 1 lb = 0.4536 kg; 1 in = 2.54 cm)  0.808 𝑔 1 𝑚𝐿 ∗   1 𝑘𝑔 1000 𝑔 1 𝑙𝑏 0.4536 𝑘𝑔 1 𝑚𝐿 1 𝑐𝑚 3 ∗ ( 2.54 𝑐𝑚 1 𝑖𝑛 ) 3 ∗ ( 12 𝑖𝑛  1 𝑓𝑡 ) 3 = 50.4  𝑙𝑏 𝑓𝑡 3       Example Problem:   Fueling stop - The dipstick indicated a volume of 7682 L of fuel in the tank.  A  mass of 22,300 kg of fuel is required for the trip (fuel need is calculate by mass) 
 
o  Mechanics used a density of 1.77 kg/L to convert between L and kg: 
o  Mass of fuel in tank: 
7682𝐿 ∗ 1.77𝑘𝑔 𝐿 = 13,600𝑘𝑔  o  Mass of fuel needed:  22,300𝑘𝑔 − 13,600𝑘𝑔 = 8,700𝑘𝑔  o  But the density is 1.77lb/L NOT kg/L  Density in kg/L:    𝑑𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑦 = 𝑘𝑔 𝐿 =   1.77𝑙𝑏 𝐿 0.4536𝑘𝑔 1𝑙𝑏 =   0.803𝑘𝑔 𝐿   o  Mass of fuel in tank:   7682𝐿 ∗ 0.803𝑘𝑔 𝐿 = 6,170𝑘𝑔  o  Mass of fuel needed:  22,300𝑘𝑔 − 6,170𝑘𝑔 = 16,130𝑘𝑔    Example Problem – Complex Unit Conversion  Gold can be hammered into very thin sheets called gold leaf.  A builder needs to cover a 100 ft x 
82 ft ceiling with gold leaf that is five millionths of an inch thick.  The density of gold is 19.32 
g/cm
3 , and gold costs $1418 per troy ounce (1 troy ounce = 31.1034768 g).  How much will it  cost for the builder to purchase the necessary gold?     (1 in = 2.54 cm)  100𝑓𝑡 ∗ 82𝑓𝑡 ∗ (5 ∗ 10 −6 )𝑖𝑛 ∗ 1𝑓𝑡 12𝑖𝑛 = 0.00342𝑓𝑡 3   $𝐶𝑜𝑠𝑡 = 0.00342𝑓𝑡 3 ∗ ( 12𝑖𝑛 1𝑓𝑡 ) 3 ∗ ( 2.54𝑐𝑚 1𝑖𝑛 ) 3 19.32𝑔 𝑐𝑚 3 1 𝑡𝑟𝑜𝑦 𝑜𝑧 31.1034768𝑔 $1418 𝑜𝑧 = $85,300   
PROPERTIES  
Intensive Properties: 
Independent of quantity 
  Density, Melting Point, Freezing Point, Boiling Point  Extensive Properties: Depend on mass or quantity     Mass, Volume, Heat, Length   
 
 
 
background image TEMPERATURE SCALES 
Fahrenheit (
o F):  Commonly used in the U.S.; water freezes at 32 o F and boils at 212 o F.  the Fahrenheit  scale has a different degree size and different zero points than the other two scales.    ℉ = 1. 8   𝐶 + 32     Celsius ( o C):  Scale used in science and around the world; water freezes at 0 o C and boils at 100 o C.       𝐶 =   (℉−32) 1.8   Kelvin (K):  The “Absolute temperature scale”; begins at absolute zero and has only positive values; 
water freezes at 273 K and boils at 373 K.  The Kelvin and Celsius scales use the same size degree but 
their starting points differ. 
    𝐾 =      𝐶 + 273.15    Example Problem – Temperature  Conversion  Liquid nitrogen has a boiling point of –196 o C.  What is this temperature in  o F and K?  ℉ = 1.8℉ °𝐶 − (−196°𝐶) + 32°𝐶 = −321℉       POLYMERS    Polymers undergo a phase change as a function of temperature called the glass transition  
  Temperatures below the glass-transition temperature of the polymer o-ring is listed as a major 
factor in the Challenger explosion disaster.    
UNCERTANITY OF MEASUREMENTS 
  Uncertainty due to: The precision of the measuring device, the accuracy of the observer 
  Every measurement includes some uncertainty.  The rightmost digit of any quantity is always 
estimated    The recorded digits, certain and uncertain, are called significant figures. 
  The greater the number of significant digits in a quantity, the greater its certainty. 
  A measurement is only as good as the measuring device 
 
SIGNIFICANT FIGURES 
  Any non-zero digit is significant. 
  Zeros between non-zero digits (captive zeros) are significant 
  Place holding zeros on the left of the first non-zero digit are not significant; these are only used 
to locate the decimal point.    Trailing zeros following a decimal point are significant. 
  Trailing zeros in a number without a decimal point are presumed to be placeholders and are not 
significant.  Examples:   o  100 - 1 significant figure  
o  100. - 3 significant figures 
o  100.0 - 4 significant figures 
o  0.04050 – 4 significant figures 
o  2090 – 3 significant figures 
o  3.040 x 10
4 –4 significant figures Exact Numbers: Defined quantities are precise and the concept of significant figures has no meaning for 
these. These include most conversion factors. Counted objects are treated similarly.  
  100 cm = 1m  
   1in = 2.54cm 
  Exact numbers do not limit the number of significant digits in a calculation  
background image Addition and Subtraction: The answer has the same number of decimal places as there are in the 
measurements with the fewest decimal places  
89.332 + 1. 1 = 90.4 |32  Multiplication and Division: The answer contains the same number of significant figures as in the 
measurement with the fewest significant figures 
134 ∗ 25 = 33 50 → 3400  Example Problem: If a steel Ball has a circumference of 32.5mm and weighs 4.20g, what is it’s density?  𝐶𝑖𝑟𝑐𝑢𝑚𝑓𝑒𝑟𝑒𝑛𝑐𝑒 = 32.5 = 2𝜋𝑟  𝑟 = 5.172536  𝑉 =   4
3
𝜋𝑟 3 = 579.6944 𝑚𝑚 3   𝑑𝑒𝑛𝑠𝑖𝑡𝑦 = 4.20𝑔 579.6944 𝑚𝑚 3 ∗   (10𝑚𝑚) 3 1𝑐𝑚 3 = 7.25𝑐𝑚 3    
Precision: Range of measurements close in value, affected by systematic error 
  Systematic Error: Usually come from the measuring instruments  Accuracy: Close to true value, affected by random error    Random Error: Caused by unknown and unpredictable changes in the experiment  o  Measuring instruments 
o  Environmental conditions  
 
Rules for Rounding Off Numbers: 
1.  If the digit removed is more than 5, the preceding number increases by 1  o  Ex. 5.379 -> 5.38 -> 5.4  2.  If the digit removed is less than 5, the preceding number is unchanged  o  Ex.  0.2413 -> 0.241 -> 0.24  3.  If the digit removed is 5, the preceding number increased by 1 if it is odd and remains  unchanged if it is even  o  Ex. 17.75 -> 17.8 
o  Ex. 17.65 -> 17.6 
  If the 5 is followed only by zeros, rule 3 is followed; if the 5 is followed by non-zeros, rule 1 is  followed  o  Ex. 17.6500 -> 17.6 
o  Ex. 17.6513 -> 17.7 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Department: Chemistry
Course: General Chemistry
Professor: Hanson
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Chemistry, review, study, guide, 1035, virginia, and Tech
Name: General Chemistry 1035: Test 1 Study Guide
Description: These notes cover chapters 1-3 in order to prepare for the first General Chemistry test
Uploaded: 09/19/2016
16 Pages 139 Views 111 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Virginia Tech - CHEM 1035 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here