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UTC - PSY 3310 - Class Notes - Week 5

Created by: Annah Shrader Elite Notetaker

UTC - PSY 3310 - Class Notes - Week 5

School: University of Tennessee - Chattanooga
Department: Psychology
Course: Social Psychology
Professor: David Ross
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Social Psychology Week 5 Notes
Description: These notes are only over the lecture on 9/22/16. He reviewed a lot, and talked about friendship.
Uploaded: 09/23/2016
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background image Social Psychology  Week 5  9/22/16     
A Little Review
  Cognitive dissonance: feeling uncomfortable around people who think differently  than us. We will change friends, not initiate friendship because we want to get 
back our balance. 
    Humans like predictability even if it's negative. Familiarities trump what might  not be good for us. An example would be women staying in abusive relationships. 
 
  Mere exposure effect: we like what and who we are exposed to often, even  without having to know or communicate with another person. We see someone 
around and develop a preference of liking them without interacting.  
    Reward theory: interactions in a relationship become mutually rewarding. Both  parties are getting something positive out of the relationship.   
Why do we make friends with the people we make friends with
  Physical proximity: physical availability is very important for forming  relationships. People might have similar schedules where they see each other all 
the time, or they might live close by. You cannot be friends with people you do 
not meet. These initial interactions become planned ones. We expect to see 
people in our routine schedules. Social media also plays into this. We still choose 
people based off of their similar interests.  
 
 
Elements of attraction for friendship
  We like those who are similar
  We like people who are roughly equal to ourselves in terms of physical 
attractiveness. This is due to being comfortable, having a balance. This is true 
especially for those who are high on Self-monitoring: sensitive to how they 
appear to others, and sensitive to how others appear socially.  
 
Why do we care about physical attractiveness
  There are advantages to being physically attractive. People who are more  attractive tend to make more money on average, as well as get the job, be 
background image perceived as more successful etc. Preferential treatment over time builds up and 
the individual benefits from the constant positive reinforcement. 
  Infants look at the attractive face longer than unattractive faces. Which leads to: 
  Evolutionary reasons to reproduce more attractive offspring by mating with more 
attractive people.      
Experiments discussed in class
  Students were randomly assigned a date at a school dance. Afterwards there was  a rating of their dates on level of physical attraction and whether they would go 
on a second date with them. Students only wanted a second date with the person 
if they were equally as attractive as they were from their perspective.  
 
  There was a study of MIT married couples who moved into a new dorm not  knowing anyone else moving in. The next door neighbors of the couples ended up 
being best friends. This is due to physical proximity. 
    The Chinese symbol experiment. We do not have to cognitively be aware of  remembering the Chinese symbols we saw last to have a preference for them 
when shown again. This is due to the mere exposure effect. 
    Perception of gender begins at birth. 24 hours after birth the parents were  interviewed about girl and boy infants. Boys were viewed as stronger and more 
independent. Girls were cuter, sweeter, and more fragile. These are social 
constructs affecting the way we perceive others. 
    Experiment on kids playing in snow suits. Told different groups of volunteer  participants the kids were either two girls, two boys or a mix of the two. They 
were rated on aggression and affection. Boys just being boys were affectionate 
and girls hitting were labeled as aggressive. Societal constructions were at play 
since everyone viewed the same video. 
    Jane Elliot study on eye color yielded different results than the following  experiment:    Children’s IQ scores actually go up because a teacher perceives them to be  smarter than the other children. By telling teachers these particular (randomly 
chosen) students were late bloomers were expected to do quite well with time, 
the teacher treated them better and expected them to get smarter throughout 
the year and their IQ's actually improved compared to the other students just 
because a teacher treated them differently. It was a self-fulfilling prophecy and 

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School: University of Tennessee - Chattanooga
Department: Psychology
Course: Social Psychology
Professor: David Ross
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Social Psychology Week 5 Notes
Description: These notes are only over the lecture on 9/22/16. He reviewed a lot, and talked about friendship.
Uploaded: 09/23/2016
3 Pages 18 Views 14 Unlocks
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