Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UM - M 121 - Class Notes - Week 4

Created by: Madyson Beagley Elite Notetaker

> > > > UM - M 121 - Class Notes - Week 4

UM - M 121 - Class Notes - Week 4

School: University of Montana
Department: Math
Course:
Professor: Dwyer
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: CHMY121
Description: Random first upload
Uploaded: 09/27/2016
0 5 3 43 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 10 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Beagley 1 Madyson Beagley Writ 101 23 September 2016 Decisions Are Everything The latest romantic novel sits accompanied by fake, plastic pumpkins upon the autumn­ themed shelves of bookstores everywhere. The readers flood into those bookstores in a statement of loyalty to and love for the author. As they do so, the world is reminded of what it took for that  author to attain such a following. Authors, whether of essays, letters, novels, or speeches are  acutely aware of their rhetorical situations and their minds are awake to who is reading and  listening. The “rhetors” make conscious decisions as to how they write in order to appeal to a  certain audience. Readers and listeners gather as an audience at whichever genre station they find appealing. The category of the material dictates exactly who the audience is and how they react  to the material. The audience’s existence alone makes rhetorical situation an attainable idea for a  rhetor. In the four works, “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, “Beauty in the Bathroom”, “A Few  Words About Breasts”, and “The Rhetorical Situation”, the authors don’t simply write, rather,  they keenly acknowledge their genre, audience, and rhetorical situation by making conscious  decisions pertaining to how they write. Martin Luther King Jr. displays his awareness of genre, audience, and rhetorical situation  in many instances in “Letter from Birmingham Jail.” to so effectively write his “Letter from  Birmingham Jail.” The letter is a response to a public statement that was expressed by eight 
background image Beagley 2 white religious leaders. Those eight men expressed that Martin Luther King Jr.’s nonviolent  protests against the ill treatment of blacks were not passive but rather that they were worthy of  “concern and caution.” The events occurring around King’s time were highly centralized around  segregation and civil rights. King was aware of this exigence and knew that adding more  gasoline to the fire by using hateful and indignant words would not be a wise decision. He knew  that he did not have the upper hand at this point and that he would have to be aware of the  manner in which he would write. His awareness to his audience is expressed when he writes, “I  would not hesitate to say that it is unfortunate that so­called demonstrations are taking place in  Birmingham at this time, but I would say in more emphatic terms that it is even more unfortunate that the white power structure of this city left the Negro community with no other alternative”  (King 1). King uses words that are firm but not angry; intelligent but not arrogant. He firmly  states his position on the circumstance when writing, “I have earnestly worked and preached  against violent tension, but there is a type of constructive nonviolent tension that is necessary for  growth” (2). He respectfully educates his audience about his preaching of nonviolence while also indicating that “tension” is necessary in order for change. He reiterates the need for tension and  demand by saying, “We know through painful experience that freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed (2).” This statement proves his point to  the audience by reminding them that the blacks are protesting because the hand of oppression has bruised them far too many times and they are ready to demand their freedom, even if it brings  tension. The stigma that was attached to blacks provided a major need for “tension” and for that  very “tension” to produce change. Throughout the letter, King deliberately tries to subvert the 
background image Beagley 3 belief that blacks were inferior to whites. He does this by proving his intelligence through his  tactful approach in regard to the circumstance. Because King used formal and appropriate words, the letter was more likely to be read and thought about rather than being disregarded as an angry  and disorganized thrash at the white population. Formality was the necessary means by which  King would have any chance at having a voice in a white controlled time in history. His  respectful yet unyielding words show the readers of today that he was indeed, very aware of his  audience because he made the letter’s genre “formal.” So, he made the effort to line it out in  formal and controlled use of the English language. King’s decisions in his style of writing are  great proof of how very aware he was of both his genre and his audience.  In his awareness to his audience, he also appealed to them by being extremely truthful.  He did not exaggerate and he did not lie or point fingers in biased anger. He knew of his  rhetorical situation, so he sought out to be as truthful as he could. King did feel some bitterness  for the “white church” but he is honest enough to point out that they performed noteworthy deeds as well by saying, I have been disappointed with the white church and its leadership. Of course, there are  some notable exceptions. I am not unmindful of the fact that each of you has taken  some significant stands on this issue. I commend you, Reverend Stallings, for your  Christian stand this past Sunday in welcoming Negroes to your Baptist Church worship  service on a non­segregated basis. I commend the Catholic leaders of this state for  integrating Springhill College   several years ago (5). Martin Luther King Jr. does not fabricate his letter or choose to brush aside the positive deeds of  the white church. In King’s decision not to hide the good and exaggerate the bad that white men 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Montana who use StudySoup to get ahead
10 Pages 60 Views 48 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Montana who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Montana
Department: Math
Course:
Professor: Dwyer
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: CHMY121
Description: Random first upload
Uploaded: 09/27/2016
10 Pages 60 Views 48 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UM - M 121 - Class Notes - Week 4
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UM - M 121 - Class Notes - Week 4

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here