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UCR / Music / MUS 014 / What is corrido?

What is corrido?

What is corrido?

Description

School: University of California Riverside
Department: Music
Course: Popular Musics of the World
Professor: Rene lysoff
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: MUS 14 Popular Music of the World; Professor Lysloff
Description: Hey guys! Here's my study guide for the midterm. It goes over all the regions and genres we have talked about already in class. Good luck with your studying and on this midterm!
Uploaded: 10/16/2016
8 Pages 10 Views 16 Unlocks
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Popular Music of the World


What is corrido?



Professor Lysloff

Exam 1 Study Guide

Starting Note: I provided basically two types of study guides. One is blank (the first one) and the other I have filled out. Feel free to use both! I just think it may be helpful to fill out a study guide on your own to practice and see what you already know. Good luck on the exam everyone!

Terms & People​: Define the terms and if applicable, include the area of origin.

1. Bob Marley

2. Candomblé

3. Carnival

4. Communitas

5. Conservative Elitism

6. Corrido

7. Cueca

8. Cultural Greyout

9. Cultural Imperialism

10. Favela

11. Liminality

12. Neo-Marxist Critical Theory

13. Personality Cults

14. Popular Music

15. Rastafarianism

16. Schizophonia

17. Sound Space

18. Temporary Autonomous Zone

19. Victor Jara


What is liminality?



Areas & Genres​: Define terms and describe the characteristics of each genre.

Latin America

1. Chile

2. Borderlands/Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Southern California) a. Tejano, or Tex-Mex

b. Conjunto, or Norteño

c. Chicken Scratch, or Waila

d. Native American Message Music

3. Brazil

a. Samba (Street and Urban)

4. Jamaica

a. Mento

b. Ska

c. Rocksteady

d. Reggae

5. Nueva Canción

6. Tropicália

KEY: All terms are highlighted. The blue highlight is for things mentioned in the last lecture before the exam which I have not mentioned in previous notes that I’ve posted. Anything in “quotes” is a song title.

Terms & People 

1. Bob Marley: a committed rastafarian musician known in reggae music a. “One Love”

2. Candomblé: dancing to honor the Gods


What is reggae?



3. Carnival: a celebration marking the beginning of Lentin; involves candomble and can create communitas; example of temporary autonomous zone

4. Communitas: the feeling of being together even for a short amount of time 5. Conservative Elitism: the belief that music is vulgar and a threat to art music; belief that music represents the masses as viewed by the upper class

6. Corrido: a song that tells a story; narrative

7. Cueca: a ¾ or 6/8 time signature (3 beats per measure; quarter note is one beat; or 6 beats per measure with eighth notes as one beat) If you want to learn more check out acis 1504 exam 1

8. Cultural Greyout: many cultures begin to combine and therefore lose their own uniqueness and differences become difficult to distinguish If you want to learn more check out cmp msu

9. Cultural Imperialism: culture decides what popular music is; two opposing views on this theory are: conservative elitism and neo-marxist critical theory

10. Favela: hillside slum, shanty town; associated with Samba

11. Liminality: a threshold betwixt and between; marks the time between events; for example, Carnival marks the time between normal lifestyle and We also discuss several other topics like ser gerund

12. Neo-Marxist Critical Theory: the belief that music taste of all is manipulated by the upper class/elites; the view by the middle/working class

13. Personality Cults: the admiration and focus on a particular individual/thing (especially, in this case, music)

14. Popular Music: music of the people as opposed to art/classical music (music of the elites) 15. Rastafarianism: afro-centric culture inspired by Marcus Garvey (Jamaican political figure); promotes pan africanism and afro-centrism with a religious context a. Dreadlocks If you want to learn more check out penn state hpa

b. marijuana/ganja

c. Colors green, yellow, red, black

16. Schizophonia: literally “split sound;” sound is dislocated from its source; the difference between an acoustic source and a mechanical source; for example, using a microphone to amplify your voice If you want to learn more check out in the smcr model, what is the content being transmitted?

17. Sound Space: the space in which sound can be heard; like a parameter 18. Temporary Autonomous Zone: psychological social freedom

a. Mardi Gras/Carnival: People act differently from normal during these times 19. Victor Jara: Chilean singer/songwriter of protest/political songs

a. “El Lazo”

Areas & Genres 

1. Chile

a. Nueva Canción: means “New Song;” Latin American movement originating in Chile containing political contexts

i. Critical of government

ii. Cueca rhythm

iii. Narrative songs (tell a story)

iv. Instruments: charango, panpipes, quena, el bomba

2. Borderlands/Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Southern California) a. Tejano, or Tex-Mex: modern conjunto

i. Electric instruments, brass, saxophone, percussion, polished sound

ii. Accordion playing in a percussive fashion

iii. Polka-like rhythm

iv. “God’s Child (Balia Commigo)” by Selena and David Byrne

v. “Justica, Tierra y Libertad” by Mana

b. Conjunto, or Norteño: music originating in Texas near Mexican border; before Tejano music

i. Instruments: accordion, guitar, bajo sexto (bass chordal guitar, 6 strings), tolooche (contrabass), tambora de rancho (ranch drum), saxophone, drum set We also discuss several other topics like nutr205

ii. Polka-like rhythm

iii. Corrido is a type of conjunto

1. “De Paisano a Paisano” by Los Tigres del Norte

iv. “La Cuquita” by Nariso Martinez

c. Chicken Scratch, or Waila: social dance music originating in the Tohono O’Odham Nation (in Southern Arizona) which is home to the Papago Indians i. “Old Man Rooster” by The Molinas

ii. “Turkey in the Straw” heard in the film, Steamboat Willie

d. Native American Message Music: New Age contemporary crossover music which carries a message; the messages involve Native American values and what it means to be Native American

i. Bone flute/end blown flute, synthesizers, percussion, chant-like singing in no particular language (called vocables)

ii. “Carry the Gift” by R. Carlos Nakai

3. Brazil

a. Tropicália: a Brazilian artistic movement that encouraged the resistance of western culture by using western influences and changing them

1. “Cada Macaco” (song)

2. “Anima” (song)

b. Samba (Street and Urban)

i. Both: rooted in Carnival, involve dancing, marching/parades, costumes

ii. Street Samba: performed in the streets

iii. Urban Samba: can be commodified (bought and sold); heavily sponsored 4. Jamaica

a. Mento: pre-reggae music; rhythm like: (1 2 3 x 1 2 3 x) with an accent on 1 b. Ska: pre-reggae music; rhythm like: ( x 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 1); bass on 1 and 3; saxophone and guitar on off beats (x’s)

c. Rocksteady: pre-reggae music with same rhythm as ska; bass more involved and percussion less involved

i. “Love Me Today” by Stranger Cole

d. Reggae: a refinement of rocksteady

i. “The Harder They Come” by Jimmy Cliff

ii. “One Love” by Bob Marley

***remember to also study the songs he has on iLearn!

***if anyone needs clarification or has any questions about these notes, please contact me at cpolo001@ucr.edu 

***Thanks for purchasing this Study Guide! I hope it was helpful :)

Popular Music of the World

Professor Lysloff

Exam 1 Study Guide

Starting Note: I provided basically two types of study guides. One is blank (the first one) and the other I have filled out. Feel free to use both! I just think it may be helpful to fill out a study guide on your own to practice and see what you already know. Good luck on the exam everyone!

Terms & People​: Define the terms and if applicable, include the area of origin.

1. Bob Marley

2. Candomblé

3. Carnival

4. Communitas

5. Conservative Elitism

6. Corrido

7. Cueca

8. Cultural Greyout

9. Cultural Imperialism

10. Favela

11. Liminality

12. Neo-Marxist Critical Theory

13. Personality Cults

14. Popular Music

15. Rastafarianism

16. Schizophonia

17. Sound Space

18. Temporary Autonomous Zone

19. Victor Jara

Areas & Genres​: Define terms and describe the characteristics of each genre.

Latin America

1. Chile

2. Borderlands/Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Southern California) a. Tejano, or Tex-Mex

b. Conjunto, or Norteño

c. Chicken Scratch, or Waila

d. Native American Message Music

3. Brazil

a. Samba (Street and Urban)

4. Jamaica

a. Mento

b. Ska

c. Rocksteady

d. Reggae

5. Nueva Canción

6. Tropicália

KEY: All terms are highlighted. The blue highlight is for things mentioned in the last lecture before the exam which I have not mentioned in previous notes that I’ve posted. Anything in “quotes” is a song title.

Terms & People 

1. Bob Marley: a committed rastafarian musician known in reggae music a. “One Love”

2. Candomblé: dancing to honor the Gods

3. Carnival: a celebration marking the beginning of Lentin; involves candomble and can create communitas; example of temporary autonomous zone

4. Communitas: the feeling of being together even for a short amount of time 5. Conservative Elitism: the belief that music is vulgar and a threat to art music; belief that music represents the masses as viewed by the upper class

6. Corrido: a song that tells a story; narrative

7. Cueca: a ¾ or 6/8 time signature (3 beats per measure; quarter note is one beat; or 6 beats per measure with eighth notes as one beat)

8. Cultural Greyout: many cultures begin to combine and therefore lose their own uniqueness and differences become difficult to distinguish

9. Cultural Imperialism: culture decides what popular music is; two opposing views on this theory are: conservative elitism and neo-marxist critical theory

10. Favela: hillside slum, shanty town; associated with Samba

11. Liminality: a threshold betwixt and between; marks the time between events; for example, Carnival marks the time between normal lifestyle and

12. Neo-Marxist Critical Theory: the belief that music taste of all is manipulated by the upper class/elites; the view by the middle/working class

13. Personality Cults: the admiration and focus on a particular individual/thing (especially, in this case, music)

14. Popular Music: music of the people as opposed to art/classical music (music of the elites) 15. Rastafarianism: afro-centric culture inspired by Marcus Garvey (Jamaican political figure); promotes pan africanism and afro-centrism with a religious context a. Dreadlocks

b. marijuana/ganja

c. Colors green, yellow, red, black

16. Schizophonia: literally “split sound;” sound is dislocated from its source; the difference between an acoustic source and a mechanical source; for example, using a microphone to amplify your voice

17. Sound Space: the space in which sound can be heard; like a parameter 18. Temporary Autonomous Zone: psychological social freedom

a. Mardi Gras/Carnival: People act differently from normal during these times 19. Victor Jara: Chilean singer/songwriter of protest/political songs

a. “El Lazo”

Areas & Genres 

1. Chile

a. Nueva Canción: means “New Song;” Latin American movement originating in Chile containing political contexts

i. Critical of government

ii. Cueca rhythm

iii. Narrative songs (tell a story)

iv. Instruments: charango, panpipes, quena, el bomba

2. Borderlands/Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Southern California) a. Tejano, or Tex-Mex: modern conjunto

i. Electric instruments, brass, saxophone, percussion, polished sound

ii. Accordion playing in a percussive fashion

iii. Polka-like rhythm

iv. “God’s Child (Balia Commigo)” by Selena and David Byrne

v. “Justica, Tierra y Libertad” by Mana

b. Conjunto, or Norteño: music originating in Texas near Mexican border; before Tejano music

i. Instruments: accordion, guitar, bajo sexto (bass chordal guitar, 6 strings), tolooche (contrabass), tambora de rancho (ranch drum), saxophone, drum set

ii. Polka-like rhythm

iii. Corrido is a type of conjunto

1. “De Paisano a Paisano” by Los Tigres del Norte

iv. “La Cuquita” by Nariso Martinez

c. Chicken Scratch, or Waila: social dance music originating in the Tohono O’Odham Nation (in Southern Arizona) which is home to the Papago Indians i. “Old Man Rooster” by The Molinas

ii. “Turkey in the Straw” heard in the film, Steamboat Willie

d. Native American Message Music: New Age contemporary crossover music which carries a message; the messages involve Native American values and what it means to be Native American

i. Bone flute/end blown flute, synthesizers, percussion, chant-like singing in no particular language (called vocables)

ii. “Carry the Gift” by R. Carlos Nakai

3. Brazil

a. Tropicália: a Brazilian artistic movement that encouraged the resistance of western culture by using western influences and changing them

1. “Cada Macaco” (song)

2. “Anima” (song)

b. Samba (Street and Urban)

i. Both: rooted in Carnival, involve dancing, marching/parades, costumes

ii. Street Samba: performed in the streets

iii. Urban Samba: can be commodified (bought and sold); heavily sponsored 4. Jamaica

a. Mento: pre-reggae music; rhythm like: (1 2 3 x 1 2 3 x) with an accent on 1 b. Ska: pre-reggae music; rhythm like: ( x 1 x 2 x 3 x 4 x 1); bass on 1 and 3; saxophone and guitar on off beats (x’s)

c. Rocksteady: pre-reggae music with same rhythm as ska; bass more involved and percussion less involved

i. “Love Me Today” by Stranger Cole

d. Reggae: a refinement of rocksteady

i. “The Harder They Come” by Jimmy Cliff

ii. “One Love” by Bob Marley

***remember to also study the songs he has on iLearn!

***if anyone needs clarification or has any questions about these notes, please contact me at cpolo001@ucr.edu 

***Thanks for purchasing this Study Guide! I hope it was helpful :)

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