×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UNL - Psyc 287 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UNL - Psyc 287 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UNL / Psychology / PSYC 287 / What is self-report data?

What is self-report data?

What is self-report data?

Description

School: University of Nebraska Lincoln
Department: Psychology
Course: Psychology of Personality
Professor: Pearce
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Exam 2 Study Guide for PSYC 287
Description: This study guides covers everything you need to know for exam 2 :)
Uploaded: 10/17/2016
24 Pages 8 Views 7 Unlocks
Reviews

bentonsubie (Rating: )

. Other: not showing up



PSYC 287 Exam 2 Study Guide


What is self-report data?



∙ Data Types

o S­Data: self­report; efficacy expectations

 Usefulness: can reflect complex aspects of character that no other data  source could access

 Advantages

∙ Large amount of information, access to thoughts, feelings, & 

intentions, self­verification, simple & easy 

 Disadvantages

∙ Maybe they won’t/can’t tell you, too simple & too easy

o I­Data: informant; other individuals will provide their insight; someone who  knows you/the participant

 Usefulness: allows for outside opinion on the individual’s personality  Advantages

∙ Real­world basis, common sense, causal force, definitional 

 Disadvantages


What are the advantages and disadvantages of self-report data?



∙ Limited behavioral information, lack of access to private 

experience, error, bias

o L­Data: life outcomes; any kind of public information

 Usefulness: verifiable, concrete, may hold psychological significance   Advantages

∙ Objective & verifiable, psychological relevance, intrinsic 

importance, multi­determination

 Disadvantages

∙ Hard to tell cause

o B­Data: behavior; watching/observing people (sometimes can be collected in  experiments

 Allows you to collect your own observations on the individual’s 

personality

 Advantages

∙ Range of contexts, appearance of objectivity


What is informant data?



 Disadvantages If you want to learn more check out utep endowment
If you want to learn more check out microbiology fiu

∙ Difficult & expensive, uncertain interpretation 

∙ Types of Research 

o Case Studies: involves a very close examination of a person or event  Advantages

∙ A well­chosen case study can be a source of ideas, sometimes the 

method is absolutely necessary

 Disadvantages/weaknesses

∙ The degree to which its findings can be generalized as unknown

o Experimental: have to randomly assign to two or more groups; manipulate the  factor interested in 

 Advantages

∙ Gains insight into methods of instruction, researcher can have 

control over variables, intuitive practice shaped by research  We also discuss several other topics like uga learning commons
We also discuss several other topics like How are health and education related?

 Disadvantages

∙ Subject to human error, sample may not be representative, human  response can be difficult to measure

o Correlational: an associational research study; no experimental groups, everybody is treated the same

 Advantages

∙ Allows to collect much more data than experiments, the results 

tend to be more applicable to everyday life

 Disadvantages/weaknesses

∙ Cannot provide a conclusive reason for a relationship, causation 

cannot be determined 

∙ Key Research Concepts

o Reliability: a reliable measure gives you a result you can trust

o Validity: measuring what you intend to measure Don't forget about the age old question of phi 105 what is critical thinking

o Generalizability: do your measures work on everyone? Don't forget about the age old question of phy 131 asu

o What problems can affect these research concepts and how do researchers address them?

 Reliability

∙ Problems – participant error, experiment error, distractions, 

situations & temporary states 

∙ Improvements – data aggregation, clear/carefully designed 

experimental protocol 

 Validity

∙ Problems – when something doesn’t measure what it intends to 

measure, no validity w/o reliability 

∙ Improvements – attempting new tests

 Generalizability

∙ Problems – will it continue to apply across time, ethnicity, gender,  culture

∙ Improvements – adapt measures to fit different cultures

∙ Key Statistical Concepts

o Correlation: (r) represents the strength of the linear relationship between two  variables

∙ Trait Theory

o Big Five personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness,  conscientiousness, & openness

o Correlations between big 5 personality traits & behavior/life outcomes  Neuroticism: people who score high on this trait tend to deal ineffectively  w/ problems in their lives & react more negatively to stressful events

 Openness: people scoring high are viewed by others as creative, 

imaginative, open­minded, & clever

 Conscientiousness: organized, dependable, self­discipline

 Agreeableness: compassionate, cooperative, trusting

 Extraversion: positive emotions, assertiveness, sociability

∙ The Brain and Biochemistry

o Identify the parts of

neurons and their

functions 

 Dendrite –

receive

stimulation

(brings

information

to the

neuron)

 Nucleus – contains the majority of the cell’s genetic material in the form  of multiple linear DNA molecules organized into chromosomes 

 Axon – passes the messages (sends information to other neurons)

 Cell body p connects to the dendrites and contains the nucleus

 Myelin sheath – essential for the proper functioning of the nervous  system; a fatty while substance that surrounds the axon of some nerve  cells, forming an electrically insulating layer

 Axon terminal – specialized to release the electrical impulse of the  presynaptic cell

 Action potential – the change in electrical potential associated with the  passage of an impulse along the membrane of a muscle or nerve cell

o Distinguish the tree types of neurons

 Afferent – sensory neurons; receives information from sensory organs and  transmits input to the central nervous system 

 Efferent – motor neurons; conducts impulses outward from the 

brain/spinal cord 

 Interneurons – transmits impulses between other neurons

o Identify the functions and locations of the following brain structures and their  connection with personality, if known:

 Thalamus – regulates arousal

∙ Located between the cerebral cortex and midbrain

∙ Personality – consciousness, sleep, alertness

 Hypothalamus – links nervous systems to endocrine system through  pivitary gland

∙ Located below the thalamus and is part of the limbic system

∙ Personality – controls body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue, 

sleep cycle 

 Amygdalae – memory and emotion processing

∙ Located near the base of the brain, behind the hypothalamus

∙ Personality – important role in emotions

 Hippocampi – consolidates short­term memory into long term memory  ∙ Located in the medial temporal lobe of the brain

∙ Personality – important in processing memories

 Frontal lobes

∙ Recognize consequences, choose between alternatives, suppress  socially unacceptable behavior, compare and contrast

∙ Left frontal lobe – more active when a person wants to approach  something pleasant 

∙ Right frontal lobe – associated with wanting to withdraw from  something unpleasant or frightening 

∙ Located at the front of each cerebral hemisphere and positioned in  from of the parietal lobe and above and in front of the temporal 

lobe 

 ARAS (ascending reticular activating system)

∙ Transmits messages to the limbic system and hypothalamus

∙ Triggers release of hormones and neurotransmitters, and facilitates  functions such as learning, memory, and wakefulness

∙ Located in the brain stem

o Describe the four main brain imaging techniques, the order of their invention, and their pros and cons 

 EEG (electroencephalography)

∙ Uses electrodes on the scalp

∙ Pro – provides good temporal resolution; con – poor spatial 

resolution

∙ Invented in 1924 

 MEG (magnetoencephalography) 

∙ Used for mapping brain activity by recording magnetic fields ∙ Pro – provides good temporal resolution; con – poor spatial 

resolution 

∙ Invented in 1968

 PET (positron emission tomography)

∙ Measures blood flow using radioactive tracers

∙ Pro – good spatial resolution; con – poor temporal resolution ∙ Invented in 1975

 fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging)

∙ measures change in magnetization between oxygen­rich and  oxygen­poor blood

∙ pro – doesn’t use radiation like x­rays and other methods; con –  expensive, researchers still don’t completely understand how it 

works 

∙ invented in 1990

o describe findings from case studies of brain damage/lesion

 Phineas Gage

∙ Networked at a railroad, his head was impaled by a rod and 

damaged his frontal lobes

∙ he became stubborn and had flat emotion

∙ frontal lobe damage seems to interfere with emotional stability and understanding others’ emotions

 Michelle Philpots

∙ She was in a car accident which resulted in damage to her brain ∙ Her memory was damaged, she can remember things before the  accident but now when something happens one day, she forgets it  the next

 Charles Whitman

∙ His amygdalae were damaged which caused him rage he would  have never had before, this resulted in him murdering his wife and  mother

 Wernicke­Korsakoff syndrome

∙  A type of brain disorder caused by a lack of vitamin b­1

∙ common in people who have an alcohol use disorder and in people  whose bodies do not absorb food properly 

∙ tends to develop as Wernicke symptoms go away (Wernicke  encephalopathy) 

∙ Wernicke encephalopathy causes brain damage in the thalamus and hypothalamus

o Describe the brain stimulation research of José Delgado and Donald Ewan  Chapman

 José Delgado

∙ Electrical stimulation research on monkeys – tried to control them ∙ He also did human implantation 

o 25 subjects received implants, limbs could be moved 

independently of subjects’ free will 

o specific behaviors could not be directed, but aggression 

could be increased/decreased

 Donald Ewan Chapman – chemical stimulation

∙ Participated in MKULTRA experiments for the CIA

∙ Possibly intended to achieve mind­control, but useful for 

information extraction 

∙ Administered LSD to people unknowingly to study their reactions ∙ Some “driving” experiments involved putting subjects into long  drug­induced comas while playing loops of simple statements or  noise 

∙ No lasting intended behavior effects

o Identify the following neurotransmitter hormones, and other substances, and  describe their effects on personality (defined broadly as thinking, feeling, and  behavior):

 Dopamine – described as the neurotransmitter that turns motivation into  action 

∙ Involved in brain’s control of body and in approach response  ∙ High levels correlate with sociability and perhaps extraversion  impulsivity 

∙ Seems to be associated with extraversion and openness to 

experience

 Serotonin – seems to play a role in inhibition of behavior impulses ∙ Involved in inhibiting impulsive behaviors, restraining 

overreactions, limiting worrying 

∙ Low levels found in violent criminals and suicide 

∙ High levels in the nervous system are associated with increase in  extraversion and decreased neuroticism

∙ Associated with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and emotional  stability

 Epinephrine (adrenaline)

∙ Stress response (fight or flight)

 Norepinephrine (noradrenaline)

∙ Increases heart rate, concentration

∙ High levels associated with anxiety

 Testosterone

∙ Testosterone (primarily in males & estrogen (females)

o Both are present in both genders

∙ Said to be that males who regularly engage in aggressive behavior,  drug abuse, and have problems with interpersonal relationship tend to have high levels of testosterone 

∙ Injections of testosterone increase sexual desire in women 

 Oxytocin

∙ Released by the hypothalamus & circulates through the body and  brain via the bloodstream 

∙ Plays an important role in romantic attachment, sexual response,  and parental attachment

∙ Behavioral correlates in women: increases observed during sexual  activity, childbirth, breastfeeding

∙ Behavioral correlates in men & women: reduced fear response  Cortisol 

∙ Released into the bloodstream by the adrenal cortex as a response  to physical or psychological stress

∙ Part of the body’s preparation for action as well as an important  part of several normal metabolic processes 

∙ Stress, depression, and anxiety can cause an increase in cortisol  ∙ Low levels associated with PTSD, sensation seeking, reduced  response to danger or stress

 Caffeine – stimulant

∙ Reduces effects of adenosine (inhibitor neurotransmitter that  suppresses activity in the central nervous system) in the brain

∙ Also may be involved in control of sleep­wake cycle

 Methamphetamine

∙ Activates the neurochemical reward cascade/dopamine release ∙ Psychological effects: euphoria, anxiety, alertness, increased  energy 

∙ May cause persistent or permanent memory loss, reduced attention  span 

 Alcohol

∙ Increases effects of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (causes  motor impairment, slurred speech)

∙ Inhibits excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate (causes 

psychological slow down)

∙ Increases amount of dopamine

∙ Cerebral cortex: depresses inhibition, slows sensory processing,  inhibits thought 

∙ Cerebellum: affects sexual arousal and performance

 Cannabis (THC)

∙ Analgesic effects, relaxation, sensory alteration, fatigue, appetite  stimulation (via hypothalamus), and dopamine release (reward) 

suppresses nausea 

o Describe brain systems and their connection to personality 

 C­system – sets of structures involved in reflective thinking about self  X­system – effortless thinking about social situations

 BAS/BIS

∙ Behavioral activation system – aroused when people receive cues  from their environment that a goal or reward can be attained in 

response to carrying out some behavior (sensitive to rewards)

∙ Behavioral inhibition system – activated upon receiving cues in the environment that a punishment or some negative response may 

occur as a result of pursuing some behavior (sensitive to 

punishment)

o Describe the basic research strategy for studying the heritability or personality  traits and key findings about the heritability of big five traits

 Studies involving MZ twins & DZ twins

∙ To the degree that a trait is influenced by genes, people who are  closer genetic relatives ought to be more similar on the trait than  people who are more distantly related 

∙ Monozygotic twins share 100% of their genes

∙ Dizygotic twins share 50% of their genes

 Sibling Studies

∙ B­data shows more similarities in siblings raised together which  suggests family environment plays a role in personality 

 Adopted Sibling Studies

∙ Heritability vs. environment

∙ With these studies, it shows that the environment can play a role in personality traits

 Evidence suggests personality traits of identical twins, fraternal twins,  non­twins, and adopted siblings correlated at magnitudes proportional to  genetic similarity, which suggests heritability 

o Explain the heritability coefficient: what does it signify, and when will it be high  or low?

 Computed to reflect the degree to which variance of the trait in the  populations can be attributed to variance in genes 

 If the correlations of MX twins on the trait of interest are not very  different from DZ twins on the trait of interest, the heritability coefficient  will be low

 How to calculate: 

∙ Find correlation of identical twins’ personality trait of interest and  do the same for fraternal twins

∙ Calculate difference and multiply by 2

o Describe the eugenics movement (positive and negative eugenics) and key people  involved in the movement discussed in class

 Eugenics: the belief that humanity could and should be improved through  selective breeding

 Sir Francis Galton

∙ Positive eugenics: improve genetic composition of the population  by encouraging healthy, smart people to reproduce

∙ Negative eugenics: improve genetics of population by 

discouraging the poor and unintelligent from reproducing

 Harry H. Laughlin (negative eugenics)

∙ Published model sterilization act

∙ Subjects for sterilization: the “feeble minded”, insane, criminals,  epileptics, alcoholics, blind and deaf people, deformed people, and  indigent people

 Buck vs. Bell

∙ Carrie Buck was committed to the Virginia State Colony for  Epileptics and the Feeble Minded (to be sterilized) by her adoptive  family after she gave birth to a child out of wedlock at about age  18 

∙ First to be sterilized at the colony

o Define evolutionary personality psychology 

 Attempt to explain human behavior or personality by theorizing about how it might have been adaptive for the human species thousands of years ago  ∙ Humanism 

o Define and describe humanistic psychology and describe its basic approach to  personality, its strengths, and its weaknesses

 The goal of humanistic psychology is to overcome this paradox by  acknowledging and addressing the ways in which psychology is unique  Focuses on each individual’s potential to be good – basic belief is that  people are innately good and that psychological problems are deviations  from the natural tendency to be good

 Strengths – emphasizes the role of the individual, accounts for 

environmental influences, and therapeutic techniques can be used to 

benefit normal, healthy people

 Weaknesses – very subjective, focus on individual experience makes it  difficult to apply scientific methods; observations are unverifiable, 

humanistic psychology is concerned with things that are difficult to 

measure (creativity, free will, potential) 

o Describe theories of: 

 Carl Rogers (person­centered therapy, unconditional positive regard) ∙ Person­centered therapy: a counselling approach that requires the 

client to take an active role in his or her treatment with the 

therapist being nondirective and supportive

∙ Unconditional positive regard: the basic acceptance and support of  a person regardless of what the person says or does 

 Abraham Maslow (hierarchy of needs)

∙  A persona’s ultimate need is to self­actualized

∙ hierarchy or needs: 

sel

f

act

ual

iza

tio

status,  

n

esteem

belonging, social activity

safety, security, comfort, sex

basic physiological needs, food, water, etc.

∙ empirical support:

o in poorer countries, well­being correlates with economic 

status

o in richer countries, well­being correlates more weakly with 

economic status

 George Kelly – personal construct theory suggest that people develop  personal constructs about how the world works

 Mihály Csíkszentmihály – flow: the subjective experience of an activity –  the enjoyment itself 

 Richard Ryan and Edward Deci

∙ Self­determination: concerns people’s inherent growth tendencies 

and innate psychological needs; concerned with the motivation 

behind choices people make without external influences and 

interference

∙ Positive psychology: the aim of this growing field of theorizing 

and research is to correct what its proponents see as long­standing 

over emphasis within psychology on psychopathology and 

malfunction

o Improve quality of life and prevent the pathologies that 

arise when life is a barren and meaningless

 Salvatore Maddi

∙ Hardiness – the stress created by social pressures of modern life 

can cause people to suffer existential neurosis characterized by 

boredom, apathy, and feelings that life is meaningless – the ability 

to endure difficult conditions

o Define positive psychology, describe its approach, and identify the main  proponents of positive psychology discussed in class 

 Positive psychology: the aim of this growing field of theorizing and  research is to correct what its proponents see as long­standing over 

emphasis within psychology on psychopathology and malfunction

∙ Improve quality of life and prevent the pathologies that arise when  life is a barren and meaningless

 3 areas of focus

∙ positive memories, experiences, and emotions

∙ positive individual traits (virtues pg. 448 in book)

∙ positive institutions (ways to better the community)

 Ryan & Deci, Csíkszentmihály, Martin Seligman – research the traits and  situational factors that promote a happy meaningful life & develop 

interventions that help people build more fulfilling lives

∙ Personality and Culture

o Define and distinguish between the different types of cultures 

 Individualist & collectivistic cultures

∙ Collectivism: the needs of the group are more important than the 

needs of individuals

o Satisfaction associated with achieving harmony with group

o Roles or social hierarchies (status) are influential

∙ Individualism: independence is emphasized over relationship to 

group 

o Satisfaction associated with self­esteem

o Roles and social hierarchies are flexible

 Right & loose cultures

∙ Tight: cultures that tolerate very little deviation from proper 

behavior

∙ Loose: cultures that allow fairly large deviations from cultural  norms

 Tough & easy cultures

∙ Easy: individual can pursue many different goals and at least some  of them are relatively simple to attain

∙ Tough: only a few goals are viewed as valuable and few ways are  available to achieve them 

 Head & heart cultures

∙ Strengths of the head: creativity, learning, science

∙ Strengths of the heart: fairness, hope, love, faith

 Vertical & horizontal cultures

∙ Refers to value place on equality within the culture

∙ Vertical & collectivistic: low equality, emphasis on serving group ∙ Vertical & individualistic: low equality, emphasis on independence ∙ Horizontal & collectivistic: high equality, emphasis on serving  group

∙ Horizontal & individualist: high equality, emphasis on 

independence 

 Honor, Face, and Dignity

∙ Honor cultures value reputation and self­reliance, avoid 

appearance of weakness

∙ Face cultures emphasize respect for authority and tradition, and  find value in fulfilling social roles 

∙ Dignity cultures hold that individuals are inherently valuable and  strong, and they need not compromise their values for others; 

personal freedom, and equality are emphasized

o Define and distinguish emics and etics

 Emics – thoughts, concepts, feelings, or behaviors that are determined by a culture’s customs and beliefs

 Etics – thoughts, concepts, feelings, or behaviors that are more universally true across cultures

o Define ethnocentrism and sources of cultural bias (including outgroup  homogeneity bias)

 Ethnocentrism: judging another culture from the point of view of yourself  Outgroup homogeneity bias – the tendency to view an outgroup as  homogenous, or as “all the same” whereas the in­group is seen as more  heterogeneous or varied

o Describe how the big five traits might compare across different nations

 Some researchers have argued that only 3 of the big five – 

conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness – should be considered truly universal

 Comparing the same traits across cultures, thinking – holistic perception  and the self, independent thinking, and values

o What four issues/problems must cross­cultural research in personality work to  overcome?

 Ethnocentrism – how do you avoid having your view of other cultures be  affected by your own?

 Exaggeration of differences between nations/ethnicities (and minimizing  differences within nations/ethnicities) – outgroup homogeneity bias  Cultural relativism – idea that all cultures are valid and should not be  judge good or bad

 Multicultural societies and individuals

PSYC 287 Exam 2 Study Guide

∙ Data Types

o S­Data: self­report; efficacy expectations

 Usefulness: can reflect complex aspects of character that no other data  source could access

 Advantages

∙ Large amount of information, access to thoughts, feelings, & 

intentions, self­verification, simple & easy 

 Disadvantages

∙ Maybe they won’t/can’t tell you, too simple & too easy

o I­Data: informant; other individuals will provide their insight; someone who  knows you/the participant

 Usefulness: allows for outside opinion on the individual’s personality  Advantages

∙ Real­world basis, common sense, causal force, definitional 

 Disadvantages

∙ Limited behavioral information, lack of access to private 

experience, error, bias

o L­Data: life outcomes; any kind of public information

 Usefulness: verifiable, concrete, may hold psychological significance   Advantages

∙ Objective & verifiable, psychological relevance, intrinsic 

importance, multi­determination

 Disadvantages

∙ Hard to tell cause

o B­Data: behavior; watching/observing people (sometimes can be collected in  experiments

 Allows you to collect your own observations on the individual’s 

personality

 Advantages

∙ Range of contexts, appearance of objectivity

 Disadvantages

∙ Difficult & expensive, uncertain interpretation 

∙ Types of Research 

o Case Studies: involves a very close examination of a person or event  Advantages

∙ A well­chosen case study can be a source of ideas, sometimes the 

method is absolutely necessary

 Disadvantages/weaknesses

∙ The degree to which its findings can be generalized as unknown

o Experimental: have to randomly assign to two or more groups; manipulate the  factor interested in 

 Advantages

∙ Gains insight into methods of instruction, researcher can have 

control over variables, intuitive practice shaped by research 

 Disadvantages

∙ Subject to human error, sample may not be representative, human  response can be difficult to measure

o Correlational: an associational research study; no experimental groups, everybody is treated the same

 Advantages

∙ Allows to collect much more data than experiments, the results 

tend to be more applicable to everyday life

 Disadvantages/weaknesses

∙ Cannot provide a conclusive reason for a relationship, causation 

cannot be determined 

∙ Key Research Concepts

o Reliability: a reliable measure gives you a result you can trust

o Validity: measuring what you intend to measure

o Generalizability: do your measures work on everyone?

o What problems can affect these research concepts and how do researchers address them?

 Reliability

∙ Problems – participant error, experiment error, distractions, 

situations & temporary states 

∙ Improvements – data aggregation, clear/carefully designed 

experimental protocol 

 Validity

∙ Problems – when something doesn’t measure what it intends to 

measure, no validity w/o reliability 

∙ Improvements – attempting new tests

 Generalizability

∙ Problems – will it continue to apply across time, ethnicity, gender,  culture

∙ Improvements – adapt measures to fit different cultures

∙ Key Statistical Concepts

o Correlation: (r) represents the strength of the linear relationship between two  variables

∙ Trait Theory

o Big Five personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness,  conscientiousness, & openness

o Correlations between big 5 personality traits & behavior/life outcomes  Neuroticism: people who score high on this trait tend to deal ineffectively  w/ problems in their lives & react more negatively to stressful events

 Openness: people scoring high are viewed by others as creative, 

imaginative, open­minded, & clever

 Conscientiousness: organized, dependable, self­discipline

 Agreeableness: compassionate, cooperative, trusting

 Extraversion: positive emotions, assertiveness, sociability

∙ The Brain and Biochemistry

o Identify the parts of

neurons and their

functions 

 Dendrite –

receive

stimulation

(brings

information

to the

neuron)

 Nucleus – contains the majority of the cell’s genetic material in the form  of multiple linear DNA molecules organized into chromosomes 

 Axon – passes the messages (sends information to other neurons)

 Cell body p connects to the dendrites and contains the nucleus

 Myelin sheath – essential for the proper functioning of the nervous  system; a fatty while substance that surrounds the axon of some nerve  cells, forming an electrically insulating layer

 Axon terminal – specialized to release the electrical impulse of the  presynaptic cell

 Action potential – the change in electrical potential associated with the  passage of an impulse along the membrane of a muscle or nerve cell

o Distinguish the tree types of neurons

 Afferent – sensory neurons; receives information from sensory organs and  transmits input to the central nervous system 

 Efferent – motor neurons; conducts impulses outward from the 

brain/spinal cord 

 Interneurons – transmits impulses between other neurons

o Identify the functions and locations of the following brain structures and their  connection with personality, if known:

 Thalamus – regulates arousal

∙ Located between the cerebral cortex and midbrain

∙ Personality – consciousness, sleep, alertness

 Hypothalamus – links nervous systems to endocrine system through  pivitary gland

∙ Located below the thalamus and is part of the limbic system

∙ Personality – controls body temperature, hunger, thirst, fatigue, 

sleep cycle 

 Amygdalae – memory and emotion processing

∙ Located near the base of the brain, behind the hypothalamus

∙ Personality – important role in emotions

 Hippocampi – consolidates short­term memory into long term memory  ∙ Located in the medial temporal lobe of the brain

∙ Personality – important in processing memories

 Frontal lobes

∙ Recognize consequences, choose between alternatives, suppress  socially unacceptable behavior, compare and contrast

∙ Left frontal lobe – more active when a person wants to approach  something pleasant 

∙ Right frontal lobe – associated with wanting to withdraw from  something unpleasant or frightening 

∙ Located at the front of each cerebral hemisphere and positioned in  from of the parietal lobe and above and in front of the temporal 

lobe 

 ARAS (ascending reticular activating system)

∙ Transmits messages to the limbic system and hypothalamus

∙ Triggers release of hormones and neurotransmitters, and facilitates  functions such as learning, memory, and wakefulness

∙ Located in the brain stem

o Describe the four main brain imaging techniques, the order of their invention, and their pros and cons 

 EEG (electroencephalography)

∙ Uses electrodes on the scalp

∙ Pro – provides good temporal resolution; con – poor spatial 

resolution

∙ Invented in 1924 

 MEG (magnetoencephalography) 

∙ Used for mapping brain activity by recording magnetic fields ∙ Pro – provides good temporal resolution; con – poor spatial 

resolution 

∙ Invented in 1968

 PET (positron emission tomography)

∙ Measures blood flow using radioactive tracers

∙ Pro – good spatial resolution; con – poor temporal resolution ∙ Invented in 1975

 fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging)

∙ measures change in magnetization between oxygen­rich and  oxygen­poor blood

∙ pro – doesn’t use radiation like x­rays and other methods; con –  expensive, researchers still don’t completely understand how it 

works 

∙ invented in 1990

o describe findings from case studies of brain damage/lesion

 Phineas Gage

∙ Networked at a railroad, his head was impaled by a rod and 

damaged his frontal lobes

∙ he became stubborn and had flat emotion

∙ frontal lobe damage seems to interfere with emotional stability and understanding others’ emotions

 Michelle Philpots

∙ She was in a car accident which resulted in damage to her brain ∙ Her memory was damaged, she can remember things before the  accident but now when something happens one day, she forgets it  the next

 Charles Whitman

∙ His amygdalae were damaged which caused him rage he would  have never had before, this resulted in him murdering his wife and  mother

 Wernicke­Korsakoff syndrome

∙  A type of brain disorder caused by a lack of vitamin b­1

∙ common in people who have an alcohol use disorder and in people  whose bodies do not absorb food properly 

∙ tends to develop as Wernicke symptoms go away (Wernicke  encephalopathy) 

∙ Wernicke encephalopathy causes brain damage in the thalamus and hypothalamus

o Describe the brain stimulation research of José Delgado and Donald Ewan  Chapman

 José Delgado

∙ Electrical stimulation research on monkeys – tried to control them ∙ He also did human implantation 

o 25 subjects received implants, limbs could be moved 

independently of subjects’ free will 

o specific behaviors could not be directed, but aggression 

could be increased/decreased

 Donald Ewan Chapman – chemical stimulation

∙ Participated in MKULTRA experiments for the CIA

∙ Possibly intended to achieve mind­control, but useful for 

information extraction 

∙ Administered LSD to people unknowingly to study their reactions ∙ Some “driving” experiments involved putting subjects into long  drug­induced comas while playing loops of simple statements or  noise 

∙ No lasting intended behavior effects

o Identify the following neurotransmitter hormones, and other substances, and  describe their effects on personality (defined broadly as thinking, feeling, and  behavior):

 Dopamine – described as the neurotransmitter that turns motivation into  action 

∙ Involved in brain’s control of body and in approach response  ∙ High levels correlate with sociability and perhaps extraversion  impulsivity 

∙ Seems to be associated with extraversion and openness to 

experience

 Serotonin – seems to play a role in inhibition of behavior impulses ∙ Involved in inhibiting impulsive behaviors, restraining 

overreactions, limiting worrying 

∙ Low levels found in violent criminals and suicide 

∙ High levels in the nervous system are associated with increase in  extraversion and decreased neuroticism

∙ Associated with conscientiousness, agreeableness, and emotional  stability

 Epinephrine (adrenaline)

∙ Stress response (fight or flight)

 Norepinephrine (noradrenaline)

∙ Increases heart rate, concentration

∙ High levels associated with anxiety

 Testosterone

∙ Testosterone (primarily in males & estrogen (females)

o Both are present in both genders

∙ Said to be that males who regularly engage in aggressive behavior,  drug abuse, and have problems with interpersonal relationship tend to have high levels of testosterone 

∙ Injections of testosterone increase sexual desire in women 

 Oxytocin

∙ Released by the hypothalamus & circulates through the body and  brain via the bloodstream 

∙ Plays an important role in romantic attachment, sexual response,  and parental attachment

∙ Behavioral correlates in women: increases observed during sexual  activity, childbirth, breastfeeding

∙ Behavioral correlates in men & women: reduced fear response  Cortisol 

∙ Released into the bloodstream by the adrenal cortex as a response  to physical or psychological stress

∙ Part of the body’s preparation for action as well as an important  part of several normal metabolic processes 

∙ Stress, depression, and anxiety can cause an increase in cortisol  ∙ Low levels associated with PTSD, sensation seeking, reduced  response to danger or stress

 Caffeine – stimulant

∙ Reduces effects of adenosine (inhibitor neurotransmitter that  suppresses activity in the central nervous system) in the brain

∙ Also may be involved in control of sleep­wake cycle

 Methamphetamine

∙ Activates the neurochemical reward cascade/dopamine release ∙ Psychological effects: euphoria, anxiety, alertness, increased  energy 

∙ May cause persistent or permanent memory loss, reduced attention  span 

 Alcohol

∙ Increases effects of inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA (causes  motor impairment, slurred speech)

∙ Inhibits excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate (causes 

psychological slow down)

∙ Increases amount of dopamine

∙ Cerebral cortex: depresses inhibition, slows sensory processing,  inhibits thought 

∙ Cerebellum: affects sexual arousal and performance

 Cannabis (THC)

∙ Analgesic effects, relaxation, sensory alteration, fatigue, appetite  stimulation (via hypothalamus), and dopamine release (reward) 

suppresses nausea 

o Describe brain systems and their connection to personality 

 C­system – sets of structures involved in reflective thinking about self  X­system – effortless thinking about social situations

 BAS/BIS

∙ Behavioral activation system – aroused when people receive cues  from their environment that a goal or reward can be attained in 

response to carrying out some behavior (sensitive to rewards)

∙ Behavioral inhibition system – activated upon receiving cues in the environment that a punishment or some negative response may 

occur as a result of pursuing some behavior (sensitive to 

punishment)

o Describe the basic research strategy for studying the heritability or personality  traits and key findings about the heritability of big five traits

 Studies involving MZ twins & DZ twins

∙ To the degree that a trait is influenced by genes, people who are  closer genetic relatives ought to be more similar on the trait than  people who are more distantly related 

∙ Monozygotic twins share 100% of their genes

∙ Dizygotic twins share 50% of their genes

 Sibling Studies

∙ B­data shows more similarities in siblings raised together which  suggests family environment plays a role in personality 

 Adopted Sibling Studies

∙ Heritability vs. environment

∙ With these studies, it shows that the environment can play a role in personality traits

 Evidence suggests personality traits of identical twins, fraternal twins,  non­twins, and adopted siblings correlated at magnitudes proportional to  genetic similarity, which suggests heritability 

o Explain the heritability coefficient: what does it signify, and when will it be high  or low?

 Computed to reflect the degree to which variance of the trait in the  populations can be attributed to variance in genes 

 If the correlations of MX twins on the trait of interest are not very  different from DZ twins on the trait of interest, the heritability coefficient  will be low

 How to calculate: 

∙ Find correlation of identical twins’ personality trait of interest and  do the same for fraternal twins

∙ Calculate difference and multiply by 2

o Describe the eugenics movement (positive and negative eugenics) and key people  involved in the movement discussed in class

 Eugenics: the belief that humanity could and should be improved through  selective breeding

 Sir Francis Galton

∙ Positive eugenics: improve genetic composition of the population  by encouraging healthy, smart people to reproduce

∙ Negative eugenics: improve genetics of population by 

discouraging the poor and unintelligent from reproducing

 Harry H. Laughlin (negative eugenics)

∙ Published model sterilization act

∙ Subjects for sterilization: the “feeble minded”, insane, criminals,  epileptics, alcoholics, blind and deaf people, deformed people, and  indigent people

 Buck vs. Bell

∙ Carrie Buck was committed to the Virginia State Colony for  Epileptics and the Feeble Minded (to be sterilized) by her adoptive  family after she gave birth to a child out of wedlock at about age  18 

∙ First to be sterilized at the colony

o Define evolutionary personality psychology 

 Attempt to explain human behavior or personality by theorizing about how it might have been adaptive for the human species thousands of years ago  ∙ Humanism 

o Define and describe humanistic psychology and describe its basic approach to  personality, its strengths, and its weaknesses

 The goal of humanistic psychology is to overcome this paradox by  acknowledging and addressing the ways in which psychology is unique  Focuses on each individual’s potential to be good – basic belief is that  people are innately good and that psychological problems are deviations  from the natural tendency to be good

 Strengths – emphasizes the role of the individual, accounts for 

environmental influences, and therapeutic techniques can be used to 

benefit normal, healthy people

 Weaknesses – very subjective, focus on individual experience makes it  difficult to apply scientific methods; observations are unverifiable, 

humanistic psychology is concerned with things that are difficult to 

measure (creativity, free will, potential) 

o Describe theories of: 

 Carl Rogers (person­centered therapy, unconditional positive regard) ∙ Person­centered therapy: a counselling approach that requires the 

client to take an active role in his or her treatment with the 

therapist being nondirective and supportive

∙ Unconditional positive regard: the basic acceptance and support of  a person regardless of what the person says or does 

 Abraham Maslow (hierarchy of needs)

∙  A persona’s ultimate need is to self­actualized

∙ hierarchy or needs: 

sel

f

act

ual

iza

tio

status,  

n

esteem

belonging, social activity

safety, security, comfort, sex

basic physiological needs, food, water, etc.

∙ empirical support:

o in poorer countries, well­being correlates with economic 

status

o in richer countries, well­being correlates more weakly with 

economic status

 George Kelly – personal construct theory suggest that people develop  personal constructs about how the world works

 Mihály Csíkszentmihály – flow: the subjective experience of an activity –  the enjoyment itself 

 Richard Ryan and Edward Deci

∙ Self­determination: concerns people’s inherent growth tendencies 

and innate psychological needs; concerned with the motivation 

behind choices people make without external influences and 

interference

∙ Positive psychology: the aim of this growing field of theorizing 

and research is to correct what its proponents see as long­standing 

over emphasis within psychology on psychopathology and 

malfunction

o Improve quality of life and prevent the pathologies that 

arise when life is a barren and meaningless

 Salvatore Maddi

∙ Hardiness – the stress created by social pressures of modern life 

can cause people to suffer existential neurosis characterized by 

boredom, apathy, and feelings that life is meaningless – the ability 

to endure difficult conditions

o Define positive psychology, describe its approach, and identify the main  proponents of positive psychology discussed in class 

 Positive psychology: the aim of this growing field of theorizing and  research is to correct what its proponents see as long­standing over 

emphasis within psychology on psychopathology and malfunction

∙ Improve quality of life and prevent the pathologies that arise when  life is a barren and meaningless

 3 areas of focus

∙ positive memories, experiences, and emotions

∙ positive individual traits (virtues pg. 448 in book)

∙ positive institutions (ways to better the community)

 Ryan & Deci, Csíkszentmihály, Martin Seligman – research the traits and  situational factors that promote a happy meaningful life & develop 

interventions that help people build more fulfilling lives

∙ Personality and Culture

o Define and distinguish between the different types of cultures 

 Individualist & collectivistic cultures

∙ Collectivism: the needs of the group are more important than the 

needs of individuals

o Satisfaction associated with achieving harmony with group

o Roles or social hierarchies (status) are influential

∙ Individualism: independence is emphasized over relationship to 

group 

o Satisfaction associated with self­esteem

o Roles and social hierarchies are flexible

 Right & loose cultures

∙ Tight: cultures that tolerate very little deviation from proper 

behavior

∙ Loose: cultures that allow fairly large deviations from cultural  norms

 Tough & easy cultures

∙ Easy: individual can pursue many different goals and at least some  of them are relatively simple to attain

∙ Tough: only a few goals are viewed as valuable and few ways are  available to achieve them 

 Head & heart cultures

∙ Strengths of the head: creativity, learning, science

∙ Strengths of the heart: fairness, hope, love, faith

 Vertical & horizontal cultures

∙ Refers to value place on equality within the culture

∙ Vertical & collectivistic: low equality, emphasis on serving group ∙ Vertical & individualistic: low equality, emphasis on independence ∙ Horizontal & collectivistic: high equality, emphasis on serving  group

∙ Horizontal & individualist: high equality, emphasis on 

independence 

 Honor, Face, and Dignity

∙ Honor cultures value reputation and self­reliance, avoid 

appearance of weakness

∙ Face cultures emphasize respect for authority and tradition, and  find value in fulfilling social roles 

∙ Dignity cultures hold that individuals are inherently valuable and  strong, and they need not compromise their values for others; 

personal freedom, and equality are emphasized

o Define and distinguish emics and etics

 Emics – thoughts, concepts, feelings, or behaviors that are determined by a culture’s customs and beliefs

 Etics – thoughts, concepts, feelings, or behaviors that are more universally true across cultures

o Define ethnocentrism and sources of cultural bias (including outgroup  homogeneity bias)

 Ethnocentrism: judging another culture from the point of view of yourself  Outgroup homogeneity bias – the tendency to view an outgroup as  homogenous, or as “all the same” whereas the in­group is seen as more  heterogeneous or varied

o Describe how the big five traits might compare across different nations

 Some researchers have argued that only 3 of the big five – 

conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness – should be considered truly universal

 Comparing the same traits across cultures, thinking – holistic perception  and the self, independent thinking, and values

o What four issues/problems must cross­cultural research in personality work to  overcome?

 Ethnocentrism – how do you avoid having your view of other cultures be  affected by your own?

 Exaggeration of differences between nations/ethnicities (and minimizing  differences within nations/ethnicities) – outgroup homogeneity bias  Cultural relativism – idea that all cultures are valid and should not be  judge good or bad

 Multicultural societies and individuals

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here