×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to FIU - MAR 3023 - Class Notes - Week 1
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to FIU - MAR 3023 - Class Notes - Week 1

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

FIU / Marketing / MKT 3023 / marissa, a product manager, thinks her company's instacup coffee maker

marissa, a product manager, thinks her company's instacup coffee maker

marissa, a product manager, thinks her company's instacup coffee maker

Description


01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Market Plan TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product?




What major changes in a marketing strategy may be required as a product moves into the maturity stage of the product life cycle?




TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product?



1. What is a product? Provide an example of each type of product. ANSWER: A product is a good, a service, or an idea received in an exchange.We also discuss several other topics like kin 351 class notes
We also discuss several other topics like quadratic fit matlab
Don't forget about the age old question of drexel animation
If you want to learn more check out How are Molecules Imported into the Nucleus?
Don't forget about the age old question of mcphs intranet
If you want to learn more check out chem 135 umd
 It can be either tangible or  intangible and includes functional, social, and psychological utilities or benefits. It also  includes supporting services, such as installation, guarantees,product information, and  promises of repair or maintenance. A good is a tangiblephysical entity, such as an iPad or a  Quiznos sandwich. A service, in contrast, isintangible; it is the result of the application of  human and mechanical efforts topeople or objects. Many intangible products try to make  their products more tangibleto consumers through advertising and tangible images. An idea is a concept,philosophy, image, or issue. Ideas provide the psychological stimulation that aids  insolving problems or adjusting to the environment. For example, Mothers AgainstDrunk  Driving (MADD) promotes safe consumption of alcohol and stricterenforcement of laws  against drunk driving. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 2. Describe and illustrate the four major categories of consumer products. ANSWER: The most widely accepted approach to classifying consumer products is based  oncharacteristics of consumer buying behavior. It divides products into fourcategories:  convenience, shopping, specialty, and unsought products. Convenience products are relatively inexpensive, frequently purchased items forwhich buyers exert only minimal purchasing effort. They range from bread, softdrinks, and chewing gum to gasoline and newspapers. The buyer spends little timeplanning the purchase or comparing  available brands or sellers. Even a buyer whoprefers a specific brand will generally choose a  substitute if the preferred brand isnot conveniently available. A convenience product is  normally marketed throughmany retail outlets, such as 7­Eleven, ExxonMobil, and  supermarkets. Shopping products are items for which buyers are willing to expend considerableeffort in  planning and making the purchase. Buyers spend much time comparingstores and brands  with respect to prices, product features, qualities, services, andperhaps warranties. Shoppers  may compare products at a number of outlets.Appliances, bicycles, furniture, stereos,  cameras, and shoes exemplify shoppingproducts. These products are expected to last a fairly  long time and are purchasedless frequently than convenience items. Shopping products  require fewer retailoutlets than convenience products. Specialty products possess one or more unique characteristics, and generally buyersare  willing to expend considerable effort to obtain them. Buyers actually plan thepurchase of a  specialty product; they know exactly what they want and will notaccept a substitute.  Examples of specialty products include a Mont Blanc pen and aone­of­a­kind piece of  baseball memorabilia, such as a ball signed by Babe Ruth.When searching for specialty  products, buyers do not compare alternatives. Theyare concerned primarily with finding an  outlet that has the preselected productavailable. Unsought products are products purchased when a sudden problem must be solved,products  of which customers are unaware, and products that people do notnecessarily think of  purchasing. Emergency medical services and automobile repairsare examples of products  needed quickly to solve a problem. POINTS: 1DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 3. Distinguish between consumer products and business products. ANSWER: The most widely accepted approach to classifying consumer products is based  oncharacteristics of consumer buying behavior. It divides products into fourcategories:  convenience, shopping, specialty, and unsought products. However, notall buyers behave in  the same way when purchasing a specific type of product.Thus, a single product can fit into  several categories. To minimize this problem,marketers think in terms of how buyers  generally behave when purchasing aspecific item. Business products are usually purchased on the basis of an organization’s goals  andobjectives. Generally, the functional aspects of the product are more important thanthe  psychological rewards sometimes associated with consumer products. Businessproducts can  be classified into seven categories according to their characteristicsand intended uses:  installations; accessory equipment; raw materials; componentparts; process materials;  maintenance, repair, and operating (MRO) supplies; andbusiness services. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 4. Discuss the implications for a firm's marketing strategy of classifying a product as a convenience, shopping, specialty,  or unsought item. ANSWER: The most widely accepted approach to classifying consumer products is based on  characteristicsof consumer buying behavior. It divides products into four categories:  convenience, shopping,specialty, and unsought products. However, not all buyers behave in  the same way whenpurchasing a specific type of product. Thus, a single product might fit  into several categories.To minimize complexity, marketers think in terms of how buyers  generally behave whenpurchasing a specific item. Examining the four traditional categories  of consumer productscan provide further insight. A convenience productis normally marketed through many retail outlets, such as gas stations, drugstores, and supermarkets. Because sellers experiencehigh inventory turnover, per­unit  gross margins can be relatively low. Producers of convenienceproducts, such as Wrigley’s  chewing gum, expect little promotional effort at the retaillevel and thus must provide it  themselves with advertising and sales promotion. Packagingand displays are also important  because many convenience items are available only on a self­servicebasis at the retail level,  and thus the package plays a major role in selling the product. Shopping products are expected to last a fairly long time and are moreexpensive than  convenience products. These products, however, are still within the budgets ofmost  consumers and are purchased less frequently than convenience items. Shopping productsare  distributed via fewer retail outlets than convenience products.Because shopping products are  purchased less frequently, inventory turnover is lower,and marketing channel members  expect to receive higher gross margins to compensate forthe lower turnover. In certain situations, both shopping products and convenience productsmay be marketed in the same  location. A marketer must consider several key issues to market a shopping product  effectively,including how to allocate resources, whether personal selling is needed, and  cooperationwithin the supply chain. Although advertising for shopping products often  requires a largebudget, an even larger percentage of the overall budget is needed if marketers  determine thatpersonal selling is required. The producer and the marketing channel members  usually expectsome cooperation from one another with respect to providing parts and repair  services andperforming promotional activities. Marketers will approach their efforts for specialty productsdifferently from convenience or  shopping productsin several ways. Specialty products are often distributedthrough a very  limited number of retail outlets. Similar toshopping products, they are purchased  infrequently, causinglower inventory turnover and thus requiring high gross marginsto be  profitable. Unsought products are those purchased when a suddenproblem must be solved, products of  which customers areunaware until they see them in a store or online, and productsthat people  do not plan on purchasing. Emergency medicalservices and automobile repairs are examples  of productsneeded quickly and suddenly to solve a problem. Speed of problem resolution is  more importantthan price or other features a buyer might normally consider if there were  more time formaking a decision. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 5. Discuss some of the issues a marketer should consider when marketing a shopping product. ANSWER: To market a shopping product effectively, a marketer considers several key issues.Although  large sums of money may be required to advertise shopping products, aneven larger  percentage of resources are likely to be used for personal selling. Theproducer and the  marketing channel members usually expect some cooperationfrom one another with respect  to providing parts and repair services and performingpromotional activities. Marketers should consider these issues carefully so that theycan choose the best course for promoting these  products. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 6. Identify and describe the major categories of business products. ANSWER: Business products are usually purchased on the basis of an organization’s goals  andobjectives. Business products can be classified into seven categories according totheir  characteristics and intended uses: installations; accessory equipment; rawmaterials;  component parts; process materials; maintenance, repair, and operating(MRO) supplies; and  business services.Installations include facilities, such as office buildings, factories, and warehouses,and major  equipment that are nonportable, such as production lines and very largemachines. Normally,  installations are expensive and intended to be used for aconsiderable length of time.  Accessory equipment does not become part of the finalphysical product but is used in  production or office activities. Examples include filecabinets, fractional­horsepower motors,  calculators, and tools. Compared with majorequipment, accessory items usually are much  cheaper, purchased routinely with lessnegotiation, and treated as expense items rather than  capital items because they arenot expected to last as long. Raw materials are the basic natural materials that actually become part of aphysical product.  They include minerals, chemicals, agricultural products, andmaterials from forests and  oceans. Component parts become part of the physical product and are either finished itemsready for  assembly or products that need little processing before assembly.Although they become part  of a larger product, component parts often can beidentified and distinguished easily. Spark  plugs, tires, clocks, brakes, and head lightsare all component parts of an automobile. Process materials are used directly in the production of other products. Unlikecomponent  parts, however, process materials are not readily identifiable. Forexample, a salad dressing  manufacturer includes vinegar in its salad dressing.MRO supplies are maintenance, repair,  and operating items that facilitate productionand operations but do not become part of the  finished product. Paper, pencils, oils,cleaning agents, and paints are in this category. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Communication STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 7. Discuss the dimensions of a product mix. ANSWER: A product mix is the composite, or total, group of products that an organizationmakes  available to customers. Procter & Gamble’s product mix comprises all thehealthcare, beauty  care, laundry and cleaning, food and beverage, paper, cosmetic,and fragrance products the  firm manufactures. The width of product mix ismeasured by the number of product lines a  company offers. General Electric offersmultiple product lines, including consumer products  such as housewares, health­careproducts such as molecular imaging, and commercial engines for the military. Thedepth of product mix is the average number of different product items  offered ineach product line. Procter & Gamble is known for using distinctive  branding,packaging, segmentation, and consumer advertising to promote individual items in  itsdetergent product line. Tide, Bold, Gain, Cheer, and Era—all Procter & Gambledetergents —share the same distribution channels and similar manufacturingfacilities, but each is  promoted as a distinctive product, adding depth to the productline. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Communication STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge8. Identify the major stages of the product life cycle, and explain how industry sales and profits vary across these stages. ANSWER: A product life cycle has four major stages: introduction, growth, maturity, anddecline. As a  product moves through its cycle, the strategies relating to competition,pricing, distribution,  promotion, and market information must be evaluatedperiodically and possibly changed. The introduction stage of the product life cycle begins at a product’s firstappearance in the  marketplace, when sales start at zero and profits are negative.Profits are below zero because  initial revenues are low, and the company generallymust cover large expenses for product  development, promotion, and distribution. During the growth stage, sales rise rapidly; profits reach a peak and then start todecline. The  growth stage is critical to a product’s survival because competitivereactions to the product’s  success during this period will affect the product’s lifeexpectancy. Profits begin to decline  late in the growth stage as more competitorsenter the market, driving prices down and  creating the need for heavy promotionalexpenses. During the maturity stage, the sales curve peaks and starts to decline, and profitscontinue to  fall. This stage is characterized by intense competition because manybrands are now in the  market. Competitors emphasize improvements anddifferences in their versions of the  product. As a result, during the maturity stage,weaker competitors are squeezed out of the  market. During the decline stage, sales fall rapidly. When this happens, the marketerconsiders  pruning items from the product line to eliminate those not earning a profit.The marketer also  may cut promotion efforts; eliminate marginal distributors, andfinally, plan to phase out the  product. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 9. Explain the major stages of the product adoption process. ANSWER: The stages of the product adoption process are awareness, interest, evaluation, trial,and  adoption. In the first stage, when individuals become aware that the productexists, they have  little information about it and are not concerned about obtainingmore. Consumers enter the  interest stage when they are motivated to getinformation about the product’s features, uses,  advantages, disadvantages, price, orlocation. During the evaluation stage, individuals  consider whether the product willsatisfy certain criteria that are crucial to meeting their  specific needs. In the trialstage, they use or experience the product for the first time, possibly  by purchasing asmall quantity, taking advantage of free samples, or borrowing the product  fromsomeone. Individuals move into the adoption stage by choosing a specific productwhen  they need a product of that general type. Entering the adoption process doesnot mean that the  person will eventually adopt the new product. Rejection mayoccur at any stage, including the  adoption stage. Both product adoption and productrejection can be temporary or permanent. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Communication STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge10. Discuss the marketing efforts that are likely to be used during the growth stage of the product life cycle. ANSWER: In the growth stage, profits begin to decline late as more competitors enter themarket, driving prices down and creating the need for heavy promotional expenses.At this point, a typical  marketing strategy encourages strong brand loyalty andcompetes with aggressive emulators  of the product. During the growth stage, theorganization tries to strengthen its market share  and develop a competitive niche byemphasizing the product’s benefits. Marketers should also analyze competingbrands’ product positions relative to their own brands and take corrective  action.Aggressive pricing, including price cuts, is also typical during this stage. As  salesincrease, management must support the momentum by adjusting the marketingstrategy.  The goal is to establish and fortify the product’s market position byencouraging brand  loyalty. To achieve greater market penetration, segmentationmay have to be used more  intensely. This requires developing product variations tosatisfy the needs of people in several  different market segments. As a product gainsmarket acceptance, new distribution outlets  usually become easier to obtain.Marketers sometimes move from an exclusive or a selective  exposure to a moreintensive network of dealers to achieve greater market penetration.  Marketers mustalso make sure the physical distribution system is running efficiently so  thatcustomers’ orders are processed accurately and delivered on time.Promotion expenditures may be slightly lower than during the introductory stage butare still quite substantial. As  sales increase, promotion costs should drop as apercentage of total sales. A falling ratio  between promotion expenditures and salesshould contribute significantly to increased profits. The advertising messages shouldstress brand benefits. Coupons and samples may be used to  increase awareness aswell as market share. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 11. What major changes in a marketing strategy may be required as a product moves into the maturity stage of the product life cycle? ANSWER: During the maturity phase, the producers who remain in the market are likely tochange their  promotional and distribution efforts. Advertising and dealer­orientedpromotions are typical  during this stage of the product life cycle. Marketers alsomust take into account that as the  product reaches maturity, buyers’ knowledge of itattains a high level. Consumers are no  longer inexperienced generalists; instead,they are experienced specialists. Marketers of  mature products sometimes expanddistribution into global markets. Often the products have  to be adapted to fitdiffering needs of global customers more precisely. Because many products are in the maturity stage of their life cycles, marketersmust know  how to deal with these products and be prepared to adjust theirmarketing strategies. There are many approaches to altering marketing strategiesduring the maturity stage. To increase the  sales of mature products, marketers maysuggest new uses for them. Arm & Hammer has  boosted demand for its bakingsoda by this method, providing multiple uses for this product.  Because frozen yogurthas reached the maturity phase, Ben & Jerry’s has released new flavors and yogurttypes to appeal to changing consumer tastes. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 12. A(n) ____ is a concept, philosophy, or image. a. product b. good c. idea d. service e. issue ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Market Plan TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 13. MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) is a nonprofit organization that primarily markets a. services. b. ideas. c. goods. d. tangible products. e. features. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Market Plan TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 14. According to the text, a product is defined as a. anything the customer receives in an exchange. b. the physical object the customer receives in an exchange. c. the service that is rendered to a customer. d. the idea that the customer receives in an exchange. e. goods and services the customer receives in an exchange. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: EasyLEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 15. To make intangible products more tangible or real to the consumer, marketers often a. use low prices on intangible goods. b. use symbols or cues to help symbolize product benefits. c. use external reference prices. d. use multiple channels of distribution. e. offer more support services with such products. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Communication STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 16. Which of the following best illustrates how a firm can use a symbol to make an intangible product more tangible? a. McDonald's arches b. Mercedes Benz emblem c. Nike swoosh d. Traveler's Insurance umbrella e. Arrows on Wrigley gum packages ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 17. A light bulb can be all of the following except a. a consumer product. b. a business product. c. either a consumer product or a business product. d. a business product if it is used to light an assembly line in a factory. e. a consumer product if it is used to light the office of the board of directors. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 18. Products are classified as being business or consumer products according to the a. number of buyers involved in the decision. b. buyer's intended use of the product. c. seller's intended use of the product. d. location of use. e. types of outlets from which they are purchased. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 19. Which of the following is always used to determine the classification of a good? a. Buyer's intent for using the product b. Amount of shopping required by the buyer to obtain the product c. Price of the product d. Specific product features e. Industry competitors ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 20. Ava, a purchasing agent for Trailsend Transport, is currently buying carpet from CarpetOne Inc. for use in an office  area at Trailsend. While she is discussing the details of this carpet, the representative from CarpetOne tells her that she  can see the actual product in one of their retail stores before finalizing the purchase. While in the retail store at CarpetOne, Ava not only approves the purchase for the office, but also decides she would like to purchase some of the same carpet for her home. The first carpet purchase is considered a ____ and the second carpet purchase is considered to be a ______. a. personal purchase; business purchase b. business product; business product c. consumer product; consumer productd. business product; consumer product e. consumer product; business product ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 21. Ryan is on his way to work when he realizes he has a flat tire. He swings into Sam’s Club and has a new tire installed.  Ryan’s purchase of a new tire in this situation is considered to be a. a shopping good b. a convenience good c. an unsought good d. a specialty good e. an industrial good ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 22. Energizer batteries would be classified as which type of product? a. Convenience b. Shopping c. Specialty d. Unsought e. Industrial service ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 23. Lindsay stops by the Safeway grocery, her preferred store, on the way home from work. She picks up her usual brand  of laundry detergent and orange juice, but she sees that there are no more range­free eggs available. Lindsay is very concerned about the ethical treatment of animals and so she leaves Safeway and goes to another grocery to purchase the  range­free eggs. Lindsay’s purchase of the laundry detergent and orange juice would most likely be classified as _____  products. Her purchase of the eggs would most likely be classified as ______ products. a. convenience; brand loyal b. convenience; shopping c. convenience; specialty d. shopping; specialty e. shopping; shopping ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 24. Dannon Yogurt represents what type of product for most consumers? a. Convenience b. Business c. Shopping d. Specialty e. Durable ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 25. Convenience products are a. relatively inexpensive, frequently purchased items for which buyers exert only minimal purchasing effort. b. frequently purchased items for which buyers are willing to exert considerable effort. c. frequently purchased items that are found in certain retail outlets. d. items that are expensive but are easy to purchase. e. items that require some purchase planning and for which the buyer often will not accept substitutes. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: ProductTOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 26. Which of the following statements does not apply to convenience goods? a. Consumers are brand loyal to convenience products and are not likely to substitute other brands. b. Convenience products require minimal shopping effort. c. Marketing of convenience products requires intensive exposure of these goods in as many stores as possible. d. Consumers tend to feel that the most desirable retail facility for convenience products is the closest one. e. Colas, gasoline, and bread are good examples of convenience goods. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 27. Products for which buyers are willing to spend much time comparing stores and brands for differences in prices,  product features, and services are called ____ products. a. shopping b. specialty c. service d. convenience e. unsought ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 28. Shannon Hill needed to buy an airline ticket to visit her parents. She went to several websites to compare rates and  chose a flight on Southwest Air lines because, for a similar price to other airlines, it had a better reputation for service. For Shannon, this flight is an example of which type of product? a. Shopping b. Convenience c. Specialty d. Unsought e. Durable ANSWER: a POINTS: 1DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 29. Gap clothing stores sell primarily what type of products? a. Convenience b. Shopping c. Unsought d. Nondurable e. Specialty ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 30. Shopping products have a ____ inventory turnover and need ____ distribution outlets than convenience goods. a. similar; more b. higher; fewer c. higher; more d. lower; more e. lower; fewer ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 31. Byron is interested in buying an antique vase for his grandmother’s birthday. He visits an antique store and buys the  first vase he sees because it is something he thinks his grandmother would like. Byron does not visit another store and  compare other vases. For Byron, this purchase is most likely considered a(an) _____ good. a. convenience b. specialty c. shopping d. uniquee. unsought ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 32. The Carsons are going on a vacation back to Texas. When they lived there, Gwen Carson loved Blue Bell Cookies.  Blue Bell is sold only in Texas. She plans to buy two boxes at the first store she visits after they arrive. For Gwen, Blue  Bell represents a(n) ____ product. a. convenience b. shopping c. specialty d. unsought e. durable ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 33. A specialty product a. requires minimal effort to purchase. b. is purchased frequently. c. requires purchase planning, and the buyer will not accept substitutes. d. is generally less expensive than other items in the same product class. e. prompts the purchaser to make comparisons among alternatives. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 34. David Wilson is an avid collector of Major League Baseball memorabilia. He greatly desires to own the "special" bat  that got the slugger Sammy Sosa a seven­game suspension due to its illegal contents. This is an example of a(n) ____  product.a. shopping b. unique c. specialty d. historical e. unsought ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 35. As Beth and Rob search for a new home, they are interested only in houses built by a particular builder. This purchase  is characteristic of a(n) ____ product. a. branded b. non­durable c. unique d. shopping e. specialty ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 36. Jose went skiing one weekend with several of his friends. While at the slope, Jose injured his leg and needed to see a  doctor. Jose is likely going to view solutions to his problem as a. specialty products. b. installations. c. unsought products. d. shopping products. e. convenience products. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying ProductsKEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 37. Nick Arnold's Auto Towing Service would best be described as a(n) ____ product. a. convenience b. unsought c. specialty d. durable e. shopping ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 38. Business products are a. purchased for personal consumption. b. chosen on the basis of preferences expressed by a business procurement department. c. purchased for both their functional aspects and their psychological rewards. d. classified according to their characteristics and intended uses. e. not purchased by nonbusiness organizations. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 39. Facilities, factories, and production lines with very large equipment are all classified as a. accessory equipment. b. permanents. c. installations. d. component parts. e. MRO facilities. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: ProductTOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 40. Tojitos Mexican Restaurant purchased several large ovens for use in remodeling its kitchens. These ovens are an  example of which type of business product? a. Raw materials b. Installations c. Accessory equipment d. Component parts e. Process materials ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 41. As the production manager of an engineering firm, you went out and bought a metal cutting machine. What you have  purchased can best be classified as a a. raw material. b. processed component. c. component part. d. service. e. business product. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 42. An accountant buys a supply of pencils to be used in calculating the taxes of other business firms. Based on this  information, pencils in this case would be considered what type of product? a. Business b. Process materials c. Raw material d. Convenience e. Consumer ANSWER: a POINTS: 1DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 43. Which of the following is not a business product? a. Oil to be refined into fuel b. Chips to be integrated into components for personal computers c. Paper, pens, and tape to be used in an office d. Marketing consulting services to aid a company in marketing a new product e. Calculators bought to help individuals complete their personal federal income tax forms ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 44. Intuitiv Manufacturing’s large plastics molding machine suddenly broke down during its day shift. When considering  the purchase of available alternatives, Intiutiv decided to rent one for the next two years instead of buying one. In this  situation, the large plastics molding machine it rented would be classified as a. an installation. b. accessory equipment. c. an unsought good. d. a process material. e. MRO supplies. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 45. Business products are classified into the following seven categories according to characteristics and intended uses: raw materials, installations, accessory equipment, component parts, process materials, business services, and a. production activities. b. service assistance. c. specialty industrial products.d. computer programming and operation services. e. MRO supplies. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 46. Minerals, chemicals, timber, and agricultural products are considered a. process materials. b. accessory materials. c. MRO supplies. d. component parts. e. raw materials. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 47. A distributor of plumbing supplies purchases a desktop computer to aid in inventory control. This computer is an  example of which type of business product? a. Raw material b. Installations c. Accessory equipment d. Component part e. Process material ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 48. Although they become part of a larger product, ____ can often be easily identified and distinguished on the larger  product.a. component parts b. accessory parts c. raw materials d. process materials e. MRO supplies ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 49. Business products that are purchased routinely, do not become part of finished goods, and are expense items rather  than capital goods are called a. raw materials. b. installations. c. accessory equipment. d. component parts. e. process materials. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 50. A set of Bose car speakers sold to Ford for use in the production of a hybrid Escape, would be an example of a(n) a. component part. b. specialty item. c. accessory equipment. d. raw material. e. process material. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application51. Brain Games, Inc. is a marketing research company which markets primarily to consumer products organizations.  Brain Games provides products that are most likely considered a. component parts. b. MRO supplies. c. process ideas. d. business services. e. installations. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 52. Products used directly in the production of a final product but are not easily identifiable are categorized as a. accessory products. b. component parts. c. MRO supplies. d. assembly components. e. process materials. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 53. A product item is best described as a a. component of a marketing mix. b. particular brand. c. specific characteristic of a product. d. specific version of a product. e. unit of measure for the product. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: ProductTOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 54. Sara Lee Corporation manufactures desserts, breads, pantyhose, meats, and a variety of other products. These products make up Sara Lee's product a. line. b. item. c. mix. d. width. e. depth. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 55. A product line is defined as a. products that can be designated as a unique offering among the organization's products. b. products that an organization makes available to consumers. c. a group of closely related products that are considered a unit because of marketing, technical, or end­use  considerations. d. a specific group of products that are offered to the market. e. products that are sold by the same firm or a division of a firm. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 56. Brunswick's bowling balls, bowling bags, and shoes are individual product ____ for this sporting goods manufacturer. a. menus b. mixes c. lines d. life cycles e. ensembles ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: ModerateLEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 57. A product mix is best described as a. all products offered by a firm. b. product, distribution, promotion, and price. c. many products sold by one firm. d. all products of a particular type. e. a group of closely related products that are considered a unit because of market, technical, or end­use  considerations. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 58. Procter & Gamble makes at least eight different laundry detergents. This is most relevant to the issue of a. width of product mix. b. product mix consistency. c. depth of product mix. d. a market mix. e. a promotion mix. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 59. The depth of a product mix is measured by the average number of a. convenience products as compared with the number of specialty products. b. different product lines offered by the company. c. different products offered in each product line. d. specialty products as compared with the number of convenience products. e. product features that the company offers. ANSWER: cPOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 60. Hershey Foods Corp. offers a line of candy that includes Kit Kat, Mr. Goodbar, Krackel, Hershey's Kisses, Reese's  Peanut Butter Cups, Rolo, and Twizzlers. These candies best illustrate Hershey's product mix a. width. b. depth. c. length. d. volume. e. life cycle. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 61. One company markets such diverse products as Rosarita Mexican foods, Max Factor cosmetics, and Samsonite  luggage. These various offerings exhibit this firm's product mix a. width. b. depth. c. length. d. volume. e. dimension. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 62. The various products carried by a retailer can also have dimensions of width and depth. For example, Dick’s Sporting  Goods carries sports clothes, shoes, exercise equipment, hunting and fishing equipment, camping supplies, and other  products. Bass Pro Shops carries fishing equipment, but has a larger selection of different models and brands. In this case,  the product mix of Dick’s Sporting Goods is ___, and the product mix of Bass Pro Shops is ____. a. deep; wideb. wide and deep; wide and shallow c. deep and wide; deep and wide d. wide; deep e. wide; long ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 63. The width of a product mix is measured by the number of product a. dimensions in the product line. b. features in each brand. c. items in the product line. d. lines a company offers. e. specialties a company offers. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 64. The four major stages of a product life cycle include a. prosperity, recession, depression, and recovery. b. specialty, convenience, shopping, and unsought goods. c. decline, stabilization, exposure, and growth. d. introduction, growth, maturity, and decline. e. awareness, interest, trial, and adoption. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge65. Sales of Schwinn’s apartment­sized exercise machine have experienced a steady climb; however, the profits have been negative. The Schwinn exercise machine is most likely in the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. decline b. growth c. initial d. maturity e. introduction ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 66. During the introduction stage of a successful product, profits are usually a. at their highest point. b. negative and decreasing. c. negative and increasing. d. positive and increasing. e. declining. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 67. Which of the following is the most typical example of a new product introduction? a. Pringles sold in snack­sized containers b. A brand­new nut discovered in Africa c. A car that uses no oil or gasoline d. Shoes that literally make you run faster e. A device that cools your car while parked outside ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing StrategiesKEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 68. Marissa, a product manager, thinks her company’s InstaCup coffee maker is currently in the growth stage of the  product life cycle. If so, the profits for the InstaCup coffee maker ___ and the number of competitors ____. a. are negative; is growing b. have peaked; is growing c. are declining; is growing d. have peaked; is declining e. are declining; is declining ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 69. An ad that stresses "Get the real Proactiv Solution; accept no substitutes!" is best geared for which stage of the product life cycle? a. Introduction b. Growth c. Stabilization d. Expansion e. Decline ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 70. In which stage of the product life cycle do profits begin to decrease? a. Introduction b. Growth c. Maturity d. Decline e. Recovery ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 71. Grand Resorts Hawaii has just celebrated its first profit since opening two years ago. Grand Resorts Hawaii is most  likely in the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. Maturity b. Growth c. Introduction d. Market testing e. Stability ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 72. Which stage in the product life cycle is critical to a product's survival because competitive reactions to the product's  success during this period will affect the product's life expectancy? a. Decline b. Expansion c. Growth d. Introduction e. Stabilization ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 73. During the growth stage of the product life cycle, marketers must a. fortify the product position. b. move to exclusive distribution. c. raise the price. d. increase promotion as a percentage of sales. e. introduce private brands. ANSWER: aPOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 74. Aggressive pricing is typical during the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. decline b. growth c. introduction d. plateau e. stabilization ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 75. Achieving greater penetration of the market is typically a business goal during the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. maturity b. growth c. introduction d. market testing e. decline ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 76. Which of the following tactics would typically be employed when a product is in the growth stage of its life cycle? a. Lowering prices after developmental costs have been recovered b. Raising promotion expenditures as a percentage of total sales c. Moving from intensive to selective distribution d. Raising prices to encourage competitors to enter the market e. Reducing the number of product models in the product lineANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 77. When a business finds itself squeezed out of a market for a product or loses interest in that product, it is a sign of  being in the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. maturity b. growth c. introduction d. market reduction e. decline ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 78. During the maturity stage a. product modifications are unnecessary. b. there is less emphasis on changing a product's price. c. marketing strategies are rarely altered. d. some competitors are forced out. e. limited advertising expenditures are required to maintain market share. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 79. Heinz promoting its vinegar as an effective cleaner for wall, glass, kitchen, and bathroom surfaces would most likely be a strategy for the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. introduction b. declinec. growth d. maturity e. competitive ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 80. When a product experiences an increase in the number of competitors, it is usually in the _____ stage of the product  life cycle; however, when that competition becomes intense, it is in the ____ stage. a. introduction; maturity b. introduction; growth c. growth; decline d. growth; maturity e. maturity; decline ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 81. When banks add new services during the maturity stage, the objective they are most likely trying to achieve is a. pruning items from the product line. b. generating cash flow. c. maintaining their market share. d. filling geographic gaps. e. increasing their market share. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Strategy TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 82. Sales usually start to decline during the ____ stage of the product life cycle.a. beginning of the termination b. end of the growth c. beginning of the decline d. beginning of the growth e. end of the maturity ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 83. When Clorox introduced bleach in a no­drip bottle, the firm was taking action consistent with its product being in the  ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. introduction b. growth c. stabilization d. maturity e. decline ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 84. The makers of Tide Detergent created “pods” of the product, characterized by a small, square, plastic­wrapped packet  that was easier to use. Since it is packaged in these square pods, it requires no measuring and can be transported more  easily if one is carrying clothes to a laundromat. This change in packaging is a strategy that can most likely help boost  sales in the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. maturity b. growth c. introduction d. market reduction e. decline ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: ProductTOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 85. Which of the following stages of the product life cycle is likely to see dealers offered promotional assistance from the  producer? a. Maturity b. Growth c. Introduction d. Market reduction e. Decline ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 86. One of Cole’s responsibilities as a marketing manager for a motorcycle parts manufacturer is to maintain market  share. Cole believes that the company’s products are most likely in the maturity stage of the product life cycle. In order to  maintain market share, Cole should suggest that the company requires a. moderate to large advertising expenditures. b. moderate to large cut in promotion expenditures. c. moderate production expenditures. d. moderate price increases. e. moderate price decreases. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 87. The producers of Schick razor blades use a marketing strategy that includes large advertising expenditures and more  price flexibility for the various types of blades offered. Based on this example, razor blades are in the ____ stage of the  product life cycle. a. decline b. evaluation c. growth d. introduction e. maturity ANSWER: ePOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 88. Mercedes recognized it needed to revitalize its brand and attract different market segments. These are indications that  Mercedes’ products were primarily in the ____ stage of the product life cycle. a. maturity b. growth c. introduction d. market testing e. decline ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 89. Dish Network cut back advertising expenditures to minimum levels and reduced the number of channel members for  its industrial satellite product. These actions indicate that its product is in the ____ stage of its life cycle. a. introduction b. growth c. maturity d. early e. decline ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 90. During the decline stage of the product life cycle, a. sales rapidly decrease. b. market share is maintained. c. competition is at a peak.d. profits begin to fall. e. profits peak and then begin to decline. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 91. The stage of the product life cycle when marketers consider eliminating products that are not contributing to  profitability or the overall effectiveness of a product mix is the ____ stage. a. maturity b. decline c. growth d. introduction e. reorganization ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 92. When are marketers least likely to change a product's design, style, or other attributes? a. Introduction b. Maturity c. Decline d. Growth e. Removal ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 93. Weyerhaeuser is evaluating its complete product mix. It wishes to decrease some of its marketing expenditures and  streamline its product offerings. Weyerhaeuser will most likely look at products in the ____ stage of the product life cycle as possibilities for elimination. a. not yet developed b. growth c. introduction d. maturity e. decline ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 94. Which of the following best defines the interest stage in the product adoption process? a. The buyer tries to find the product in a retail store. b. The buyer considers the benefits and determines whether to try the product. c. The buyer tries the product to determine its usefulness. d. The buyer seeks information and is receptive to learning about the product. e. The buyer uses objective sources to learn about the product. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 95. As Jessica enters Audio Jetz car electronics department, she is asked by the salesperson if she has seen the new plug­in cell phones with coffee­warming app. She answers that she didn't know that this type of app for cars was available. Based  on this information, she is now in what stage of the product adoption process for this item? a. Awareness b. Interest c. Evaluation d. Trial e. Adoption ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: ProductTOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 96. Which of the following is not a stage in the buyer's product adoption process? a. Awareness b. Adoption c. Trial d. Exploration e. Interest ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 97. When Fiat offers to let qualified buyers test drive the Fiat Doblo Van, the dealer is trying to stimulate which stage of  the product adoption process? a. Awareness b. Interest c. Evaluation d. Trial e. Adoption ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 98. When Minute Maid mailed out free samples of its new instant drink mix, it was trying to move prospective customers  into the ____ stage of the product adoption process. a. awareness b. interest c. evaluation d. trial e. adoption ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: ModerateLEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 99. An individual knows that a product exists, but has little information regarding the product and does not seek additional information. In what stage of the product adoption process is that person? a. Trial b. Adoption c. Interest d. Awareness e. Evaluation ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 100. When an individual considers whether a product will meet certain criteria that are critical for meeting his or her  needs, in what stage of the product adoption process is this individual? a. Interest b. Awareness c. Evaluation d. Trial e. Adoption ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 101. An individual moves into the adoption stage of the product adoption process at the point when he or she a. is self­motivated to get information about the product. b. begins using that specific product. c. seriously considers whether the product will satisfy his or her needs. d. experiences the product for the first time. e. becomes aware that the product exists.ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 102. Depending on the length of time it takes them to adopt a new product, people can be divided into five major adopter  categories: early adopters, early majority, late majority, laggards, and a. late adopters. b. nonadopters. c. innovators. d. middle adopters. e. middle majority. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 103. While Alec’s grandfather still prefers using a land line, he just bought his first cell phone. Alec’s grandfather is most  likely oriented toward the past and is a member of the ____ group. a. non­adopters b. laggards c. innovators d. late adopters e. late majority ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Customer TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 104. Frito­Lay, which is widely known for producing chips and other snack products, tried to introduce Frito­Lay  lemonade. The reason this new product failed is likely because of a. poor timing.b. the failure to match product offerings to customer needs. c. technical problems. d. overestimation of market size. e. ineffective branding. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 105. Scenario 11.2 Use the following to answer the questions. Megabus is a bus line operating in the Northeast and Midwestern United States, plus in Canada. It offers travelers a cheap  alternative to driving and flying between large cities, keeping the fares extremely low yet offering the latest technology.  Unlike the traditional Greyhound Lines, Megabus is an express service, and is equipped with Wi­Fi, video screens,  headsets, and seat belts. Many buses also run on biodiesel fuel. Additionally, Megabus picks up and drops off people in  the centers of cities rather than at inconveniently­located terminals. Patrons can book tickets at Megabus.com, where some fares begin at just $1. Routes are limited, and are offered out of cities such as Toronto, New York, Baltimore,  Philadelphia, and Chicago. Recently, its competitor Greyhound, has launched two new bus lines, BoltBus and NeOn, with similar fares and high­tech amenities. A fare on NeOn bus from Buffalo, NY to New York City is $50.00 roundtrip, while  the same fare through Greyhound's traditional bus line costs $92.00. The benefit of Greyhound's traditional line is that  there are more departure times and more stops in smaller towns along the way. Refer to Scenario 11.2. What product(s) is Megabus marketing? a. Megabus is a service and therefore is not marketing a product. b. The ride between cities is a service product and is the only one Megabus is marketing. c. The ride between the cities, which is the core product, plus the supplemental features of Wi­Fi, video screens,  and other technology. d. The ride between cities, which is a convenience product. e. The ride between cities, which is a shopping product. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 106. Scenario 11.2 Use the following to answer the questions. Megabus is a bus line operating in the Northeast and Midwestern United States, plus in Canada. It offers travelers a cheap alternative to driving and flying between large cities, keeping the fares extremely low yet offering the latest technology.  Unlike the traditional Greyhound Lines, Megabus is an express service, and is equipped with Wi­Fi, video screens,  headsets, and seat belts. Many buses also run on biodiesel fuel. Additionally, Megabus picks up and drops off people in  the centers of cities rather than at inconveniently­located terminals. Patrons can book tickets at Megabus.com, where some fares begin at just $1. Routes are limited, and are offered out of cities such as Toronto, New York, Baltimore,  Philadelphia, and Chicago. Recently, its competitor Greyhound, has launched two new bus lines, BoltBus and NeOn, with similar fares and high­tech amenities. A fare on NeOn bus from Buffalo, NY to New York City is $50.00 roundtrip, while  the same fare through Greyhound's traditional bus line costs $92.00. The benefit of Greyhound's traditional line is that  there are more departure times and more stops in smaller towns along the way. Refer to Scenario 11.2. When Greyhound launched the BoltBus and NeOn bus lines, this is an example of a. a branding extension. b. co­branding. c. an extension in the width of the product mix. d. an extension in the depth of the product mix. e. family branding. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 107. Scenario 11.2 Use the following to answer the questions. Megabus is a bus line operating in the Northeast and Midwestern United States, plus in Canada. It offers travelers a cheap  alternative to driving and flying between large cities, keeping the fares extremely low yet offering the latest technology.  Unlike the traditional Greyhound Lines, Megabus is an express service, and is equipped with Wi­Fi, video screens,  headsets, and seat belts. Many buses also run on biodiesel fuel. Additionally, Megabus picks up and drops off people in  the centers of cities rather than at inconveniently­located terminals. Patrons can book tickets at Megabus.com, where some fares begin at just $1. Routes are limited, and are offered out of cities such as Toronto, New York, Baltimore,  Philadelphia, and Chicago. Recently, its competitor Greyhound, has launched two new bus lines, BoltBus and NeOn, with similar fares and high­tech amenities. A fare on NeOn bus from Buffalo, NY to New York City is $50.00 roundtrip, while  the same fare through Greyhound's traditional bus line costs $92.00. The benefit of Greyhound's traditional line is that  there are more departure times and more stops in smaller towns along the way. Refer to Scenario 11.2. Casey is searching the website of Megabus.com for the schedule and fares of a trip between  Buffalo, NY and New York City. Casey is most likely in which of the following stages of the product adoption process? a. adoption b. trial c. evaluation d. interest e. awareness ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: EasyLEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 108. Scenario 11.2 Use the following to answer the questions. Megabus is a bus line operating in the Northeast and Midwestern United States, plus in Canada. It offers travelers a cheap  alternative to driving and flying between large cities, keeping the fares extremely low yet offering the latest technology.  Unlike the traditional Greyhound Lines, Megabus is an express service, and is equipped with Wi­Fi, video screens,  headsets, and seat belts. Many buses also run on biodiesel fuel. Additionally, Megabus picks up and drops off people in  the centers of cities rather than at inconveniently­located terminals. Patrons can book tickets at Megabus.com, where some fares begin at just $1. Routes are limited, and are offered out of cities such as Toronto, New York, Baltimore,  Philadelphia, and Chicago. Recently, its competitor Greyhound, has launched two new bus lines, BoltBus and NeOn, with similar fares and high­tech amenities. A fare on NeOn bus from Buffalo, NY to New York City is $50.00 roundtrip, while  the same fare through Greyhound's traditional bus line costs $92.00. The benefit of Greyhound's traditional line is that  there are more departure times and more stops in smaller towns along the way. Refer to Scenario 11.2. The closest competitor for Megabus is Greyhound Lines. Greyhound Lines has been n business for many years, offering basic transportation services until the introduction of their new BoldBus and NeOn. Even though  both companies are in the bus transportation business, Greyhound Lines is most likely in the ____ stage of the product life cycle, while Megabus is in the _____ stage. a. Maturity; Introduction b. Maturity; Growth c. Growth; Maturity d. Growth; Decline e. Decline; Growth ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 109. A product need not be a physical product. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: ProductTOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 110. A service is intangible and is the result of the application of human or mechanical efforts to people or objects. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 111. Supporting services, such as installation and guarantees, are part of a product. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 112. The core product element of the total product can include installation, delivery, training, and financing. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 113. The atmosphere and décor of a retail store, the variety and depth of product choices, the customer support, even the  sounds and smells all contribute to the experiential element of its total product. a. True b. False ANSWER: TruePOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.01 ­ LO: 11­01 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: What Is A Product? KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 114. The buyer's intent can determine whether an item is classified as a consumer or a business product. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 115. Use of the product is the most important means of distinguishing consumer products from business products. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 116. The two major product categories are business and institutional. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge117. A product's classification can influence its price, distribution, and promotion. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 118. Bread is usually a convenience product. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 119. Consumers are reluctant to purchase substitute brands if a desired brand of a convenience product is unattainable. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 120. Unfinished furniture is considered to be a convenience product because it is relatively inexpensive. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: AnalyticSTATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 121. Per­unit gross margins on convenience products are relatively high. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 122. The gross margin percentage on convenience goods is usually fairly high because they are low­priced items. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 123. Buyers want to exert only minimal effort to obtain shopping products. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 124. Service, repair work, and accessories may be important considerations in a consumer's decision to purchase a  particular shopping product. a. True b. FalseANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 125. Obtaining a specialty product involves a considerable amount of comparison activity. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 126. Accessory equipment becomes a part of the finished product. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 127. Component parts usually need to be processed significantly before they are used in production. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge128. Process materials are used directly in the production of products. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 129. "Business Services" is not a category or type of business product. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.02 ­ LO: 11­02 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Classifying Products KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 130. A product line is a particular version of a product that can be designated as a distinct offering on the organization's  list of products. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 131. A product line includes a group of closely related product items that are considered to be a unit because of marketing, technical, or end­use considerations. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 132. Product mix refers to a related group of products in the product line. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 133. The depth of a product mix is measured by the average number of product types in a product line. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 134. The width of a product mix refers to the number of generic products offered by a company. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 135. A product mix is the composite or total group of products that an organization makes available to customers.a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 136. Procter & Gamble has a wider product mix than does Baskin Robbins. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.03 ­ LO: 11­03 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Line And Product Mix KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 137. The original marketing strategy should not be altered in any way as a product travels through the stages of the  product life cycle because consumers can become confused. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 138. Many products never get beyond the introduction stage. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: AnalyticSTATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 139. Communicating product benefits to consumers is very important in the introduction stage. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Communication STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 140. New products seldom generate enough sales to bring immediate profits. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 141. Price cuts are typical in a product's growth stage. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 142. During the growth stage, promotion costs rise as a percentage of total sales. a. True b. False ANSWER: FalsePOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 143. Intensive competition causes price increases during the growth stage of the product life cycle. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 144. Distribution outlets become more difficult to secure during the growth stage of a product's life cycle because of  aggressive competition. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 145. Intense price wars are likely to occur during the growth stage of the product life cycle as competitors attempt to gain  market share. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing StrategiesKEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 146. Profits decline in the maturity stage, largely because of increased competition. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 147. A seller's profits peak in the maturity stage of a product's life cycle. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 148. Sales peak in a product's maturity stage. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 149. Many products are in the maturity stage of the product life cycle. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: EasyLEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 150. Changing the product's quality is a distinct alternative in the maturity stage of the product life cycle. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 151. The marketing mix should be left alone during the maturity stage of the product life cycle; tampering with it may  bring an early death to the product. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 152. During a product's maturity stage, all sales promotion efforts are focused on consumers. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 153. Strategies relating to price become more mixed during a product's maturity stage.a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 154. A business can justify keeping a product as long as it contributes to profits or enhances the effectiveness of a product  mix. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 155. Sometimes new marketing channels open up in the decline stage. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 156. Promotion decreases in importance during a product's decline stage. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: AnalyticSTATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 157. Advertising used in the decline stage may prolong the life of the product. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 158. Sellers can sometimes prolong a product's life cycle. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.04 ­ LO: 11­04 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Life Cycles And Marketing Strategies KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 159. When an organization introduces a new product, people do not all begin the adoption process at the same time, nor  do they move through the process at the same speed. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 160. Trial is the first stage of the product adoption process. a. True b. FalseANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 161. A buyer becomes aware of the product during the evaluation phase of the product adoption process. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 162. In the awareness stage of the product adoption process, the buyer seeks information about the product. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 163. "The people who are in­the­know" are the early adopters. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge164. The first adopters of a product are the innovators. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 165. Early adopters are the first group of consumers to adopt a new product. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 166. Laggards are the last to adopt a new product and usually distrust new products. a. True b. False ANSWER: True POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.05 ­ LO: 11­05 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Product Adoption Process KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 167. When a successful brand such as Frito­Lay develops a new product, it will always succeed. a. True b. False ANSWER: False POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 168. Explain the difference between brand name and trademarks. ANSWER: A brand name is the part of a brand that can be spoken—including letters, words,and  numbers—such as 7UP or V8. A brand name is often a product’s onlydistinguishing  characteristic. Without the brand name, a firm could not differentiateits products. To  consumers, a brand name is as fundamental as the product itself.Indeed, many brand names  have become synonymous with the product, such asScotch Tape, Xerox copiers, and FedEx  delivery. Through promotional activities, theowners of these brand names try to protect them  from being used as generic namesfor tape, photocopiers, and overnight shipping. A trademark is a legal designation indicating that the owner has exclusive use of abrand or a  part of a brand and that others are prohibited by law from its use. Toprotect a brand name or  brand mark in the United States, an organization mustregister it as a trademark with the U.S.  Patent and Trademark Office. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 169. What is brand loyalty? Explain the three degrees of brand loyalty. ANSWER: Brand loyalty is a customer’s favorable attitude toward a specific brand. If brandloyalty is  strong enough, customers may purchase this brand consistently when theyneed a product in  that product category. Customer satisfaction with a brand is themost common reason for  loyalty to that brand. There are three degrees of brand loyalty: recognition, preference, and insistence.Brand  recognition occurs when a customer is aware that the brand exists and viewsit as an  alternative purchase if the preferred brand is unavailable or if the otheravailable brands are  unfamiliar. This is the mildest form of brand loyalty. The termloyalty is clearly used very  loosely here. Brand preference is a stronger degree of brand loyalty. A customer definitelyprefers one  brand over competitive offerings and will purchase this brand if it isavailable. However, if  the brand is not available, the customer will accept asubstitute brand rather than expending  additional effort finding and purchasing thepreferred brand. When brand insistence occurs, a customer strongly prefers a specific brand, willaccept no  substitute, and is willing to spend a great deal of time and effort toacquire that brand. If a  brand­insistent customer goes to a store and finds the brandunavailable, he or she will seek  the brand elsewhere rather than purchase asubstitute brand. Brand insistence is the strongest  degree of brand loyalty; it is abrander’s dream. However, it is the least common type of brand loyalty. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skillsSTATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Customer TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 170. How do sellers benefit from the use of brand names and brand marks? ANSWER: Sellers benefit from branding because each company’s brands identify its products,which  makes repeat purchasing easier for customers. Branding helps a firm tointroduce a new  product that carries the name of one or more of its existingproducts because buyers are  already familiar with the firm’s existing brands. Itfacilitates promotional efforts because the  promotion of each branded productindirectly promotes all other similarly branded products.  Branding also fosters brandloyalty. To the extent that buyers become loyal to a specific  brand, the company’smarket share for that product achieves a certain level of stability,  allowing the firmto use its resources more efficiently. Once a firm develops some degree  ofcustomer loyalty for a brand, it can maintain a fairly consistent price rather thancontinually  cutting the price to attract customers. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 171. What are private distributor brands? Describe their characteristics. ANSWER: Private distributor brands also called private brands, store brands, or dealer brandsare  initiated and owned by resellers—wholesalers or retailers. The majorcharacteristic of private  brands is that the manufacturers are not identified on theproducts. Retailers and wholesalers  use private distributor brands to develop moreefficient promotion, generate higher gross  margins, and change store image. Privatedistributor brands give retailers or wholesalers  freedom to purchase products of aspecified quality at the lowest cost without disclosing the  identities of themanufacturers. Familiar retailer brand names include Sears’s Kenmore  andJCPenney’s Arizona. Many successful private brands are distributed nationally.Kenmore  appliances are as well­known as most manufacturer brands. Sometimesretailers with  successful private distributor brands start manufacturing their ownproducts to gain more  control over product costs, quality, and design in the hope ofincreasing profits. Sales of  private labels have grown considerably as the quality ofstore brands has increased. More than 40 percent of shoppers consider themselves frequentbuyers of store brands, which accounts  for more than $108 billion in revenue at supermarkets,drugstores, and mass merchandisers. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 172. What is brand equity, and what are the major elements that underlie brand equity? ANSWER: A well­managed brand is an asset to an organization. The value of this asset isoften referred to as brand equity. Brand equity is the marketing and financial valueassociated with a brand’s strength in a market. Besides the actual proprietary brandassets, such as patents and  trademarks, four major elements underlie brand equity:brand name awareness, brand loyalty,  perceived brand quality, and brandassociations. Being aware of a brand leads to brand familiarity, which in turn results in a level ofcomfort  with the brand. A familiar brand is more likely to be selected than anunfamiliar brand  because the familiar brand often is viewed as more reliable and ofmore acceptable quality.  The familiar brand is likely to be in a customer’sconsideration set, whereas the unfamiliar  brand is not. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 173. What are the factors that marketers should consider while selecting a brand name? ANSWER: Marketers should consider several factors in selecting a brand name. First, thename should be easy for customers to say, spell, and recall. Short, one­syllablenames, such as Cheer, often  satisfy this requirement. Second, the brand nameshould indicate the product’s major benefits  and, if possible, should suggest in apositive way the product’s uses and special  characteristics; negative or offensivereferences should be avoided. For example, the brand  names of household cleaningproducts such as Vanish toilet bowl cleaner, Formula 409  multipurpose cleaner, andWisk laundry detergent connote strength and effectiveness. There is evidence thatconsumers are more likely to recall and to evaluate favorably names that  conveypositive attributes or benefits. Third, to set it apartfrom competing brands, the brand  should be distinctive. Further research findings have shownthat creating a brand personality  that aligns with the products sold and the target market’s self­imageis important to brand  success—if the target market feels aligned with the brand, theyare more likely to develop  brand loyalty. 30 If a marketer intends to use a brand for a productline, that brand must be  compatible with all products in the line. Finally, a brand should bedesigned to be used and  recognized in all types of media. Finding the right brand has becomean increasingly  challenging task because many obvious names have already been used. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 174. Discuss the branding strategies marketers can use. What are the two policies used by a firm to brand its products? ANSWER: Before establishing branding policies, a firm must decide whether to brand itsproducts at all.  If a company’s product is homogeneous and is similar tocompetitors’ products, it may be  difficult to brand in a way that will generate brandloyalty. Raw materials such as coal, sand,  and farm produce are hard to brandbecause of the homogeneity of such products and their  physical characteristics. If afirm chooses to brand its products, it may use individual  branding, family branding,or a combination.Individual branding is a policy of naming each product differently. Nestlé S.A. is theworld’s  largest food and nutrition company. Nestlé uses individual branding formany of its 6,000  different brands, such as NESCAFÉ coffee, PowerBar nutritionalfood, Maggi soups, and  Haagen­Dazsice cream. A major advantage of individualbranding is that if an organization  introduces an inferior product, the negative imagesassociated with it do not contaminate the  company’s other products. An individualbranding policy also may facilitate market  segmentation when a firm wishes to entermany segments of the same market. Separate,  unrelated names can be used, andeach brand can be aimed at a specific segment. When using family branding, all of a firm’s products are branded with the samename or at  least part of the name, such as Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes, Kellogg’s RiceKrispies, and  Kellogg’s Corn Flakes. In some cases, a company’s name iscombined with other words to  brand items. Arm & Hammer uses its name on all itsproducts, along with a general  description of the item, such as Arm & HammerHeavy Duty Detergent, Arm & Hammer Pure Baking Soda, and Arm & HammerCarpet Deodorizer. Unlike individual branding, family  branding means that thepromotion of one item with the family brand promotes the firm’s  other products. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 175. What steps should a marketer take to protect a brand name from use by others? ANSWER: A marketer should design a brand so that it can be protected easily throughregistration. To  protect its exclusive rights to a brand, a company must ensure thatthe brand is not likely to be considered an infringement on any brand alreadyregistered with the U.S. Patent and  Trademark Office. A marketer should guard against allowing a brand name to become a generic termused to  refer to a general product category. Generic terms cannot be protected asexclusive brand  names. For example, aspirin, escalator, and shredded wheat—allbrand names at one time— eventually were declared generic terms that refer toproduct classes. Thus, they could no  longer be protected. To keep a brand namefrom becoming a generic term, the firm should  spell the name with a capital letterand use it as an adjective to modify the name of the general product class, as inKool­Aid Brand Soft Drink Mix. Including the word brand just after the  brand nameis also helpful. An organization can deal with this problem directly by  advertisingthat its brand is a trademark and should not be used generically. The firm also  canindicate that the brand is a registered trademark by using the registered symbol. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 176. What is co­branding? Explain what makes co­branding effective. ANSWER: Co­branding is the use of two or more brands on one product. Marketers employco­branding to capitalize on the brand equity of multiple brands. Co­branding ispopular in several  processed­food categories and in the credit card industry. Thebrands used for co­branding  can be owned by the same company. For example,Kraft’s Lunchables product teams the  Kraft cheese brand with Oscar Mayerlunchmeats, another Kraft­owned brand. The brands  also may be owned bydifferent companies. Credit card companies such as American Express, Visa, andMasterCard, for instance, team up with other brands such as General  Motors,AT&T, and many airlines. Effective co­branding capitalizes on the trust and confidence customers have in thebrands  involved. The brands should not lose their identities, and it should be clear tocustomers  which brand is the main brand. Nike and Apple successfully teamed upto release a co branded running shoe, the Nike +. It syncs with an iPod to trackrunning performance. The co branded shoe and iPod accessories helped boost salesfor both brands. It is important for  marketers to understand that when a co­brandedproduct is unsuccessful, both brands are  implicated in the product failure. To gaincustomer acceptance, the brands involved must  represent a complementary fit inthe minds of buyers. Trying to link a brand such as Harley Davidson with a brandsuch as Healthy Choice will not achieve co­branding objectives  because customersare not likely to perceive these brands as compatible. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 177. What functions do packages perform? What are the factors marketers should consider when developing packages? ANSWER: Effective packaging involves more than simply putting products in containers andcovering  them with wrappers. First, packaging materials serve the basic purpose ofprotecting the  product and maintaining its functional form. Fluids such as milk andorange juice need  packages that preserve and protect them. The packaging shouldprevent damage that could  affect the product’s usefulness and thus lead to highercosts. Because product tampering has  become a problem, several packagingtechniques have been developed to counter this danger.  Some packages are alsodesigned to deter shoplifting. Another function of packaging is to offer convenience to consumers. For example,small,  aseptic packages—individual sizeboxes or plastic bags that contain liquidsand do not require  refrigeration—strongly appeal to children and young adults withactive lifestyles. The size or  shape of a package may relate to the product’sstorage, convenience of use, or replacement  rate. Small, single­serve products mayprevent waste, make storage easier, and promote  greater consumption. A thirdfunction of packaging is to promote a product by  communicating its features, uses,benefits, and image. Sometimes a reusable package is  developed to make theproduct more desirable. For example, the Cool Whip package can be  reused as afood­storage container. As they develop packages, marketers must take many factors into account.Obviously, one  major consideration is cost. Although a number of differentpackaging materials, processes,  and designs are available, costs vary greatly. Inrecent years, buyers have shown a willingness to pay more for improved packaging,but there are limits. Marketers should consider how much consistency is desirable among anorganization’s  package designs. No consistency may be the best policy, especially ifa firm’s products are  unrelated or aimed at vastly different target markets. Topromote an overall company image, a firm may decide that all packages should besimilar or include one major element of the  design. This approach is called familypackaging. Sometimes it is used only for lines of products, as with Campbell’ssoups, Weight Watchers’ foods, and Planters Nuts. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.07 ­ LO: 11­07 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Packaging KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 178. In what ways can packaging be used strategically? ANSWER: Packaging can be a major component of a marketing strategy. A new cap orclosure, a better  box or wrapper, or a more convenient container may give aproduct a competitive advantage.  The right type of package for a new product canhelp it to gain market recognition very  quickly. The company produces high­qualityorganic baby food packaged in convenient  resealable pouches. Even though thepackage costs more to use than the traditional glass jar  packaging, its design withthe zipper closure decreases the time it takes to heat up the baby  food, allows it tofit more conveniently in diaper bags, and keeps food fresh for three days  after it isfirst opened. At times, a marketer changes a package or labeling because the existing design isno longer in style, especially when compared with the packaging of competitiveproducts. A package may  be redesigned because new product features need to behighlighted or because new packaging  materials have become available.An organization may also decide to change a product’s  packaging to make theproduct safer or more convenient to use. A product’s packaging can  also bechanged to make it easier to handle in the distribution channel—for example,  bychanging the outer carton or using special bundling, shrink­wrapping, or pallets. Insome  cases, the shape of the package is changed. Outer containers for products aresometimes  changed so that they will proceed more easily through automatedwarehousing systems. Marketers also use innovative or unique packages that are inconsistent withtraditional  packaging practices to make the brand stand out from its competitors.Finally, multiple  packaging can also be an implemented in a firm’s packagingstrategy. Rather than packaging  a single unit of a product, marketers sometimes usetwin­packs, tri­packs, six­packs, or other  forms of multiple packaging. Multiplepackaging may increase demand because it increases  the amount of the productavailable at the point of consumption. It also may increase  consumer acceptance ofthe product by encouraging the buyer to try the product several times. Multiplepackaging can make products easier to handle, store, and increase consumption. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.07 ­ LO: 11­07 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Packaging KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 179. What are the major functions of a label? ANSWER: Labeling is very closely interrelated with packaging and is used for  identification,promotional, informational, and legal purposes. Labels can be small or large  relativeto the size of the product and carry varying amounts of information. A label can bea  part of the package itself or a separate feature attached to the package. The labelon a can of  Coke is actually part of the can, whereas the label on a two­liter bottleof Coke is separate andcan be removed. Information presented on a label mayinclude the brand name and mark, the  registered trademark symbol, package sizeand content, product features, nutritional  information, potential presence ofallergens, type and style of the product, number of servings, care instructions,directions for use and safety precautions, the name and address of  themanufacturer, expiration dates, seals of approval, and other facts. Labeling can be an important part of the marketing strategy. The above label can beattached  to the packaging to communicate that the product is eco­friendly. Labelingcan include claims about sustainability as well as other information that is potentiallyvaluable to the buyer.  Labels can facilitate the identification of a product bydisplaying the brand name in  combination with a unique graphic design. By drawingattention to products and their  benefits, labels can strengthen an organization’spromotional efforts. Labels may contain  promotional messages such as the offer ofa discount or a larger package size at the same  price or information about a new orimproved product feature. Several federal laws and  regulations specify informationthat must be included on the labels of certain products. Food  product labels muststate the number of servings per container, serving size, number of  calories perserving, number of calories derived from fat, number of carbohydrates, and  amountsof specific nutrients such as vitamins. POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.08 ­ LO: 11­08 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG ­ Analytic ­ Business knowledge and analytic skills STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Labeling KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 180. The part of a brand that can be spoken including letters, numbers, and words is the a. brand. b. brand mark. c. brand name. d. trade name. e. trademark. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 181. Kleenex Boutique is a ____ of tissues made by the Kimberly­Clark Corporation. a. brand mark b. brand identification c. brand name d. trademark e. trade name ANSWER: cPOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 182. McDonald's golden arches are a classic example of a a. brand. b. brand symbol. c. brand name. d. brand mark. e. trademark. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 183. A distinguishing factor between a brand name and a brand mark is that a brand name a. creates customer loyalty. b. consists of words. c. identifies only one item in the product mix. d. is registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. e. implies an organization's name. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Communication STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 184. Healthy Choice is a ____ manufactured by ConAgra Foods, which is a ____. a. brand mark; trade name b. brand name; trade name c. trade name; brand d. brand name; trademark e. brand mark; trademarkANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 185. Brands provide all of the following benefits for buyers except that they do not a. foster brand loyalty. b. help identify specific products. c. help buyers evaluate the quality of products. d. offer psychological rewards. e. reduce perceived risk of purchase. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 186. A trademark signifies a. that the owner has exclusive use of a brand and others are prohibited from using it. b. that a product was manufactured by a particular company. c. the full and legal name of an organization. d. the level of quality of a product based on its legally protected rights. e. the inventive use of a brand name or brand mark to identify a company's products. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 187. iPod is the ____ of the MP3 player made by Apple, Inc. a. trade name b. brand mark c. trade label d. brande. identifier ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 188. The full and legal name of an organization is called the a. trademark. b. legal title. c. organizational name. d. brand name. e. trade name. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 189. Jeff went to his local supermarket to purchase cola, chips, dip, and salsa for the weekend’s gathering to watch the  football game. As far as the cola goes, Jeff thinks they all taste the same and buys either Coke or Pepsi, whichever is on  sale. However, for the chips, he likes to buy Doritos White Corn when the store has them. While at the store, he picks up  Coke and Santidas Corn chips because the store did not have the Doritos. When he gets to the salsa aisle he finds that his  favorite brand, Pace’s is out of stock. Rather than buy a different brand, he goes to another store to find the Paces. Jeff’s  brand loyalty on this shopping trip can be described as ___ for the cola, ___ for the chips, and ___ for the salsa. a. recognition; preference; loyalty b. recognition; preference; insistence c. awareness; preference; insistence d. preference; awareness; insistence e. awareness; insistence; preference ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application190. Joe is an athlete who plays a variety of sports that all require various athletic shoes. He has a favorable attitude  toward Nike shoes. This favorable attitude is called brand a. loyalty. b. recognition. c. preference. d. insistence. e. equity. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 191. The weakest level of brand loyalty is brand a. recognition. b. insistence. c. equity. d. trial. e. preference. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 192. The three levels of brand loyalty from strongest to weakest are a. preference, insistence, recognition. b. insistence, recognition, preference. c. insistence, preference, recognition. d. recognition, preference, insistence. e. insistence, preference, indifference. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: BrandingKEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 193. When a customer is aware that a brand exists and considers it a possibility if his preferred brand is out, he exhibits  brand a. loyalty. b. insistence. c. preference. d. acknowledgement. e. recognition. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 194. Riley prefers to buy Pantene Shampoo for Colored Hair, however, if that is not in stock, she will buy L’Oreal or  Garnier Fructis. Riley’s level of brand loyalty can be described as ___. a. recognition. b. acceptance. c. preference. d. insistence. e. acknowledgement. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 195. Melissa needs some spaghetti sauce and always buy Ragu. However, her local supermarket is out of Ragu and since  Melissa wants to get home to cook dinner she settles for Prego. Melissa has brand ____ for Ragu and brand ____ for  Prego. a. insistence; recognition b. insistence; preference c. loyalty; preference d. preference; recognition e. preference; loyalty ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: ModerateLEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 196. A customer must have a particular brand and will accept no substitutes. This is termed brand a. preference. b. loyalty. c. insistence. d. recognition. e. requirement. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 197. What degree of brand loyalty is the strongest and most desired by marketers? a. Preference b. Requirement c. Awareness d. Insistence e. Recognition ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 198. Recently Jose went to a neighborhood grocery store to pick up a few items. When he looked for Old Spice Ultra  deodorant, it was unavailable. Although there were a number of deodorant brands available, he did not buy any deodorant. Jose's behavior indicates that he most likely has what level of brand loyalty toward Old Spice Ultra deodorant? a. Recognition b. Resistance c. Preference d. Insistence e. No brand loyaltyANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 199. The value, measured in either marketing or financial terms, associated with a brand's strength in a market is referred  to as brand a. loyalty. b. value. c. share. d. equity. e. association. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 200. Elements that help create brand equity include all of the following except brand a. quality. b. associations. c. loyalty. d. recognition. e. awareness. ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 201. Brand name awareness is an important element of brand equity because a familiar brand is more likely to be in a  customer's ____ than an unfamiliar brand. a. inept set b. loyalty setc. preference group d. brand group e. consideration set ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 202. Compared to creating and developing a brand from scratch, a firm sometimes buys a brand from another company at  a premium price because outright purchase is a. more challenging strategically. b. less time consuming. c. less risky. d. less expensive. e. less expensive and less risky. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 203. The talking gecko used by Geico Insurance facilitates the development of a. brand associations. b. brand quality. c. product preference. d. brand loyalty. e. product equity. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 204. Which of the following products is an example of a manufacturer brand?a. Great Value Corn Flakes b. JC Penney jeans c. Kmart tires d. Sony TVs e. Safeway tomato sauce ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 205. Private distributor, generic, and manufacturer are the three types of a. equity. b. brands. c. producers. d. packaging. e. trade names. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 206. A ____ brand usually requires a producer to become involved in distribution, promotion, and pricing decisions. a. dealer b. manufacturer c. private distributor d. store e. wholesaler ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge207. Another common name for a private distributor brand is a ____ brand. a. home b. manufacturer c. generic d. store e. label ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 208. Private distributor brands are owned by a. manufacturers only. b. manufacturers and retailers. c. wholesalers only. d. manufacturers and wholesalers. e. wholesalers or retailers. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 209. Old Navy sells only Old Navy labeled clothing in its retail stores. The Old Navy brand is not sold in any other outlet.  Old Navy is a ____ brand. a. generic b. reseller c. manufacturer d. distribution e. private distributor ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: BrandingKEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 210. Craftsman tools, sold and branded by Sears, is an example of a ____ brand. a. manufacturer b. generic c. wholesaler d. private distributor e. regional ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 211. The major characteristic of a private brand is that a. only retailers initiate and own the brand. b. manufacturers are not identified on the product. c. producers become involved with the marketing mix. d. producers price the product. e. wholesalers encourage producers to make the product available. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 212. Private distributor brands are owned by retailers and do not identify the manufacturer of the product. Which of the  following is an example of a private distributor brand? a. Green Giant corn b. Dell computers c. Sears Kenmore washers d. Little Debbie snack cakes e. Nike Air Jordan basketball shoes ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Challenging LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: AnalyticSTATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 213. Traditionally, the main advantage of a private brand over a manufacturer brand was the ____; now this advantage is  _____. a. better price; gradually diminishing b. better price; significantly greater c. more accessible distribution; gradually diminishing d. better quality; gradually increasing e. better quality; gradually diminishing ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Pricing United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Comprehension 214. Kellogg's Rice Krispies, a ____ brand, is likely to be found next to Crispy Rice, a ____ brand that has very similar  coloring and styling for its package. a. generic; store b. manufacturer; private c. dealer; private distributor d. producer; house e. distributor; store ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 215. Of the different types of brands, the one that has experienced the steadiest growth is a. manufacturer. b. producer. c. generic. d. private distributor. e. imitator. ANSWER: dPOINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 216. Many manufacturers that produce their own brand a. also produce generic versions of their products. b. sell only to outlets bearing their brand name. c. receive most of their profits from service work. d. use low prices to build their perceived brand quality. e. also produce products for private distributor brands. ANSWER: e POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 217. A product that is simply labeled with the product category is considered a a. private brand. b. no­name product. c. generic brand. d. poor quality item. e. lean manufacturer brand. ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Easy LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 218. A package of aluminum foil at Kroger supermarket has only a white package with black letters stating “aluminum  foil.” This product is an example of a ____ brand. a. manufacturer's b. private distributor's c. no­name d. generice. no­frills ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 219. While shopping at a landscaping store, Jessie sees a green bag labeled “potting soil.” This is an example of a. streamline packaging. b. generic branding. c. store branding. d. individual branding. e. category­consistent packaging. ANSWER: b POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 220. A ____ brand type is considered the least protectable under existing trademark regulations. a. descriptive b. fanciful c. generic d. symbolic e. suggestive ANSWER: c POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 221. Which of the following should be the least important concern for marketers when selecting a brand name? a. Choosing a name that is easy to say and recall b. Positively suggesting the product's major benefits c. Designing a name that can be used in all different types of mediad. Developing an advertising campaign to introduce the name e. Checking to see if the name is already trademarked by another company ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Knowledge 222. The Anderson Advertising Agency was developing a name for their client’s new paper towel product. They finally  settled on the name, “Soaker.” Regarding the factors that marketers consider when selecting a brand name, which one  does this best fulfill? a. Compatibility with other products in the line b. Flexibility to be used in various types of media c. Using fabricated names that cannot be duplicated d. Indicating the product's major benefits e. Keeping the brand name easy to remember ANSWER: d POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding KEYWORDS: Bloom's: Application 223. Which of the following is a primary factor specific to services in choosing a brand name? a. The service brand is usually the same as the company name so it must be flexible enough to fit several  services. b. The name must convey an image of great customer service because this is more important for services than for goods. c. The name should be distinctive and set the company apart from potential competitors. d. Shortness and conciseness are extremely important when choosing brand names for services so that they can  easily be remembered. e. Service brands are much more difficult to protect legally, so marketers must focus on creating brands with  made­up words or a combination of letters and numbers. ANSWER: a POINTS: 1 DIFFICULTY: Moderate LEARNING OBJECTIVES: MARK.PRID.16.11.06 ­ LO: 11­06 NATIONAL STANDARDS: United States ­ BUSPROG: Analytic STATE STANDARDS: United States ­ AK ­ DISC: Product TOPICS: A­Head: Branding

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here