×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

UW - LSJ 320 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Taylor McAvoy Elite Notetaker

Schools > University of Washington > Political Science > LSJ 320 > UW - LSJ 320 - Study Guide - Midterm

UW - LSJ 320 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: University of Washington
Department: Political Science
Course: International Human Rights
Professor: Professor Mayerfield
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Human Rights, midterm, UDHR, social and economic rights, civil and political rights, international human rights, international treaty, International Law, United Nations, united nations treaty, and treaty law
Name: LSJ 320 Midterm Study Guide
Description: Here it is! The much awaited LSJ 320 Human rights study guide! The guide includes all questions from our professor's guide with detailed answers and notes for each question based upon his guide and quiz section. The guide covers everything we discussed so far this quarter and what we discussed in quiz sections. I answered all questions with my best available notes and knowledge. The opinion questio
Uploaded: 10/26/2016
0 5 3 49 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 6 of a 68 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image LSJ 320 Midterm Study Guide     Some of these questions have straightforwardly factual answers. Others are more open-ended. They 
invite you to take a controversial position and defend it with arguments. 
1.  What is the theoretical significance of the U.S. Declaration of Independence?    Declare separation from Britain and necessity to do so      Statement of principle - Self-evident truths - reasonable when thought about     Gives government its power and its limitations- checks and balances     Ensures human rights – some legal rights overlap with human rights     Right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness     The Declaration of Independence certainly influences and facilitates change in other countries but 
is not itself adopted by every country 
  
 
What are the pri nciples or “truths” on which it is based?   Truths that are self-evident    All people are created equal - central claim of equality - equality is a central claim in human rights     If you recognize rights for yourself, you have to hold the same rights for others    Life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness      When a government doesn’t uphold rights- people have a right to abolish that government  
 
How does it relate political legitimacy to human rights?   Legal rights are those rights protected by law and government- they are made by society   Human rights are those rights that people have just for being human- sometimes human rights and 
legal rights don’t always line up  
The U.S. Declaration of Independence relates the two rights by outlining what rights humans should 
have under the government. It gives certain human rights legal application by writing it in the 
document.  
  Under what circumstances are people justified in overthrowing their government?   If the government becomes tyrannical and oppressive   If the people feel that the government is infringing upon their rights  
background image If the government does not uphold the promises it made     How is the content of the U.S. Declaration of Independence echoed in the Preamble to the 
Universal Declaration of Human Rights? 
They both believe that human rights should be protected by the law (although some of the specific 
rights differ) Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness  
Both believe that all men are created equal and should be awarded the rights stated in each 
document  
2.  What human rights are asserted in the original articles (1787) of the U.S. Constitution?   Rights in the original seven articles 1787     Habeus corpus may not be suspended unless when cases of rebellion, invasion, or the public 
safety may require it - right to go to trail and argue for wrongful imprisonment  
  No expost facto laws- an act that was committed legally in the past but is now considered illegal- 
the person can now be punished for an act committed in the past  
  No bills of attainer- passing laws to omit right to court     Trial by jury     No titles of mobility     Congress (not president) is given the power to declare war     Republican form of government is guaranteed to all states- common popular government     Limited definition of treason, necessary proof spelled out, giving aid to the enemy     No religious tests for public offices     What human rights are asserted in the 1791 Bill of Rights (first ten amendments)?   1st- religion, freedom of speech, press, assembly, petition governments on grievances 
  
2nd- right to bear arms and have a regulated militia- not recognized as an international human right  
  
3rd- no soldier can be quartered in a house without the owner's permission 
  
4th- right to be secure, no unreasonable search and seizure- probable cause and warrant 
  
5th- right not to be tried unless endited by grand jury - no trial more than once, when case is over, its 
over- right not to testify against self, right to remain silent, miranda, due process, right not to be 
deprived of life liberty, or property without due process  
  
This ensured a general right to life, liberty, and property  
Protects government violence in absence of law and limits the kinds of laws governments can enact  
 
6th - Right to a fair trial that is public, speedy, within a reasonable time frame 
background image   The accused has a right to know what they are accused of     The accused has a right to confront and cross examine witnesses and call witnesses of their own     The accused has a right to a lawyer    
7
th - Right to fair trial and right not to be tried again for the same thing once a jury has made a decision    
8th- No excessive bail or excessive fines should be put on a person awaiting trail with few exceptions (if 
that person is suspected to run away or a threat)  
  No cruel and unusual punishment     
The 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th amendments lead a chronology of the criminal justice system  
Underlying rights:  
  Innocent until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt     No excessive punishment on those who are found guilty     
9th - Just because these rights in the constitution her listed does not mean that they are the only rights 
human beings have and should have- rights exist prior to law and law protects rights - those rights not 
recognized in the constitution or by law still exist  
  
10th- the only powers by the national government are those given to it by the people and by the 
constitution- the government is limited only to what it is said it can do in the constitution  
  
While the constitution is built, slave states battle free states  
Then comes the civil war and Lincoln decides to instate the emancipation proclamation to abolish 
slavery and uphold the union 
  What human rights are asserted in the “Civil War amendments” and the Nineteenth 
Amendment?  
Civil war amendments  
  
13th amendment- abolishes slavery and/or involuntary servitude except when used as a form of criminal 
punishment  
  
In some southern states, they created new laws to convict African Americans and created a convict 
leasing program  
  
14th amendment- no state can abridge privileges or immunities 
  No state can deprive anyone of life, liberty, or property without due process    No state can deny anyone equal protection of laws     
All states have individual rights and congress has authority to enforce those rights  
  
15th amendment- all people have the right to vote regardless of race or previous condition of servitude 
- specifically for African Americans to vote 
  
background image Subsequent amendments  
  
19th amendment- right to vote for women 
  
26th amendment- lowers voting age from 21 to 18  
  How does the form of government authorized by the Constitution function to prevent human 
rights violations? 
The most important rights are attributed to "persons"  
Commitment to rights also reflected in form of government established- defined by: 
  Limited government     Government by popular consent- right to vote out an unjust government     Checks and balances    
Checks and balances  
  Staple of constitutional theory: Aristotle, Locke, Montesquieu, Madison    Declaration of the rights of man and citian (France 1789)     Right to challenge imprisonment     Judges have authority to ensure people are not unjustly imprisoned     
How to interpret the constitution  
Some say: we should apply meanings generally attached to constitutional provisions at the time of 
ratification 
Others say: we should apply our own best interpretation of the principles expressed in the constitution  
  3.   You should acquire a detailed knowledge of the U.S. Bill of Rights (1791), the U.S. Civil  War amendments (1865-70), and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948). What 
rights are asserted in each of these documents?
 Advice: since these documents assert a  great many rights, the best way to attack this question is to organize the various rights into 
different categories, and then learn the rights in each category
. (Note: you don’t need to  remember article numbers in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but you should, if 
possible, know which rights correspond to which amendments of the U.S. Constitution.) 
U.S Bill of Rights   First 10 original amendments passed Sep. 25 th  1789 and ratified Dec. 15 th  1791   1st- religion, freedom of speech, press, assembly, petition governments on grievances 
  
2nd- right to bear arms and have a regulated militia- not recognized as an international human right  
  
3rd- no soldier can be quartered in a house without the owner's permission 
  
4th- right to be secure, no unreasonable search and seizure- probable cause and warrant 
background image   
5th- right not to be tried unless endited by grand jury - no trial more than once, when case is over, its 
over- right not to testify against self, right to remain silent, miranda, due process, right not to be 
deprived of life liberty, or property without due process  
  
This ensured a general right to life, liberty, and property  
Protects government violence in absence of law and limits the kinds of laws governments can enact  
 
6th - Right to a fair trial that is public, speedy, within a reasonable time frame 
  The accused has a right to know what they are accused of     The accused has a right to confront and cross examine witnesses and call witnesses of their own     The accused has a right to a lawyer    
7
th - Right to fair trial and right not to be tried again for the same thing once a jury has made a decision    
8th- No excessive bail or excessive fines should be put on a person awaiting trail with few exceptions (if 
that person is suspected to run away or a threat)  
  No cruel and unusual punishment     
The 4th, 5th, 6th, and 8th amendments lead a chronology of the criminal justice system  
Underlying rights:  
  Innocent until proven guilty beyond reasonable doubt     No excessive punishment on those who are found guilty     
9th - Just because these rights in the constitution her listed does not mean that they are the only rights 
human beings have and should have- rights exist prior to law and law protects rights - those rights not 
recognized in the constitution or by law still exist  
  
10th- the only powers by the national government are those given to it by the people and by the 
constitution- the government is limited only to what it is said it can do in the constitution  
Later amendments   11 th - The judicial power cannot be applied to any suit or prosecuted against one of the United states  by citizens of another state or foreign state  Feb 7 1795  12 th - Presidential elections   June 15 1804    Civil War amendments   13 th   – Section 1- slavery is abolished except to be used as punishment for a crime Section 2-  congress has power to enforce these articles by legislation  
background image Dec 6 1865  14 th - Civil Rights -    Section 1- born or naturalized are in jurisdiction, no state can abridge privileges of citizens no state 
can deprive someone of life, liberty or property without due process or deny equal protection of law  
Section 2- state representatives   Section 3- no officer or governing member can hold an office if they engage in rebellion or aid to 
enemy  
Section 4- validity of public debt   Section 5- congress power to enforce   July 9 1868  15 th - Right to vote not denied by race, color, or previous condition of servitude   Feb 3 1870    Later amendments   16 th - congress power to collect taxes on incomes   Feb 3 1913  17 th - Senate of US two senators from each state, elected by people in said state- 6 yr terms   April 8 1913  18 th - Prohibition of liquor   Jan 16 1919- repealed Dec. 5 1933  19 th - right to vote not denied based on sex   Aug 18 1920  20 th - Terms of office   Jan 23 1933  21 st - Repeal of prohibition   Dec 5 1933  

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Washington who use StudySoup to get ahead
68 Pages 229 Views 183 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Washington who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Washington
Department: Political Science
Course: International Human Rights
Professor: Professor Mayerfield
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Human Rights, midterm, UDHR, social and economic rights, civil and political rights, international human rights, international treaty, International Law, United Nations, united nations treaty, and treaty law
Name: LSJ 320 Midterm Study Guide
Description: Here it is! The much awaited LSJ 320 Human rights study guide! The guide includes all questions from our professor's guide with detailed answers and notes for each question based upon his guide and quiz section. The guide covers everything we discussed so far this quarter and what we discussed in quiz sections. I answered all questions with my best available notes and knowledge. The opinion questio
Uploaded: 10/26/2016
68 Pages 229 Views 183 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UW - LSJ 320 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here