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MSU - PSY 353 - Class Notes - Week 6

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MSU - PSY 353 - Class Notes - Week 6

School: Montclair State University
Department: Engineering
Course: Comparative Animal Behavior
Professor: Pierre Leon
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: comparativepsychology, ComparativeAnimalBehavior, and Psychology
Name: 6 Comparative Animal Behavior
Description: Chapter 6 Quiz
Uploaded: 10/31/2016
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background image Chapter 6  If the distribution of individuals over a set of habitats is consistent with ideal free distribution  theory, then the fitness of individuals in different habitats will be the same.  Ideal free  distribution theory helps predict what animals will do when choosing between habitats.   Different habitats can provide the same types of benefits depending on how serious the  competition for food and space is. (pg 140, paragraph 3)  Contest resolution that is mediated by harmless, non-contact threat displays a Darwinian puzzle  because the losers of these interaction concede defeat without actual fighting and thereby  prematurely give up resources that would raise their fitness.  This does not seem to make any  sense because an animal is not really attempting to gain resources, they basically just accept  that it is not theirs to have after barely getting into an altercation. (pg 146, paragraph 3)  Ideal free distribution theory and evolutionary stable strategy are both based on game theory.   Ideal free distribution theory has much to do with the fact that the fitness of a habitat for an  individual is based on how well the rivals are doing in the habitat. (pg 140, paragraph 3)  Evolutionary stable strategy can be used to explain why a competitor for territory will give up  quickly because the resident-always-wins rule is a common belief. (pg 146, paragraph 3)  If a Male Tarantula Hawk Wasp is removed from its peak-top shrub that it is defending, usually  his shrub will be taken over quite quickly. What happens when the old resident wasp is released  (rather quickly) from captivity and fights the new owner? What happens when the old resident  wasp is removed for 10 days than release from captivity?  A quick release of the old wasp  usually gives him better odds in the re-takeover of his domain, but a prolonged removal  from his domain will make his re-takeover that much harder the longer the old owner has  been away.  When the old owner is away for longer, and the new owner becomes more used to  their territory and grows more attached to their space, it will be harder for the old owner to win  the territory back because the new owner has claimed it and accepted it as their new land.   There is much more in stake for the new owner the longer the territory has been owned. (pg 150,  paragraph 3) 

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School: Montclair State University
Department: Engineering
Course: Comparative Animal Behavior
Professor: Pierre Leon
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: comparativepsychology, ComparativeAnimalBehavior, and Psychology
Name: 6 Comparative Animal Behavior
Description: Chapter 6 Quiz
Uploaded: 10/31/2016
2 Pages 30 Views 24 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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