Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

Tulane - LGST 2010 - ACCN2010 - Study Guide 2 - Study Guide

Created by: Tala Rafii Elite Notetaker

> > > > Tulane - LGST 2010 - ACCN2010 - Study Guide 2 - Study Guide

Tulane - LGST 2010 - ACCN2010 - Study Guide 2 - Study Guide

School: Tulane University
Department: Business
Course: Financial Accounting
Professor: Christine Smith
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: Inventory, Ratios, assets, PlantAssets, Accounting for Merchandising Business, LIFO, FIFO, weightedaverage, SpecificId, and receivables
Name: ACCN2010 - Study Guide 2
Description: This guide covers everything said in class as well as information from the Financial Accounting textbook. Chapter 9 is completed with the textbook.
Uploaded: 10/31/2016
0 5 3 26 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 5 of a 25 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Bold: key word  Red : formulas/ratios  Green : definition  Dark Blue : date  Blue: important 
Yellow: very important 
è: Therefore, in consequence 
  Chapter 5  Merchandising Operations and the Multiple-Step Income Statement    The service industry is different from merchandize and manufacturing operations. 
A  huge  portion  of  a  merchandiser’s  Balance  Sheet  is  an  Asset  account  called 
Inventory. 
 
Manufacturer=  buys raw material, transforms it and sells the product.    
2 different categories of merchandisers
1.  Wholesaler: buys items/inventory and sells them to a retailer. Ex: Cisco. 
2.  Retailer: sells inventory to the end customer/user. 
 
Inventory Flow of Costs 
Beginning Inventory 
+ Purchases
1    < Purchase Returns and Allowances > 
< Purchases Discounts > 
= Net Purchases for the period/ Goods Available for Sale (GAFS) 
< Cost of Goods Sold > 
Ending Inventory 
 
 
Remember: 
Accounting cycle=  recording transactions for a business for a period of time to help  users make decisions. 
 
Operating cycle=  starts with a business having cash à the merchandiser spends cash  buying  Inventory  (usually  on  credit)  à  he  sells  it  and  therefore  turns  one  asset 
(Inventory) to an asset called Accounts Receivable à the business collects that claim 
to cash, and we are back to cash. 
 
The  operating  cycle  is  the  time  it  takes  a  business  to  go  from  cash  to  cash.  The 
company wants that time frame to be as quick as possible to start over and make more 
money to expand, give raises, buy and sell more. 
 
 
  1  We debit the Inventory account for the cost of purchases. 
background image We  will  make  up  3  transactions  and  record  them  from  the  perspective  of  the  buyer 
and the seller: 
Imagine a wholesaler and a retailer.  
1)  October  1 st :  the  Retailer  purchases  $  1,500  of  goods  on  credit.  The  cost  of  goods for the Wholesaler was $ 1,000.  2)  October 8 th : the Retailer paid the bill and takes advantage of the discount.   2 * ) October 8 th : We will now imagine a different scenario: the Retailer returns $  300 of the goods.  
 
General Journal: 
 
   
 
Comments: 
<  Sales  Returns  and  Allowances  >  is  a  contra  revenue  account.  We  increase  the 
liability by $ 300. 
< Sales Discounts > is a contra revenue account (of Sales Revenue).  
 
 
  Sales terms: 2/10,n/30: if the customer pays the invoice in 10 days, the customer will 
get a 2% discount. If not, the entire balance is due in 30 days. à Why does the Barber 
Shop  Supply  offer  a  discount?  Because  the  faster  it  can  turn  its  claims  to  cash  into 
cash, the better it is. à The Opportunity Cost is better for the BSS. 
This purchase discount should NOT be confused with a trade discount. Accountants 
do not account for a trade discount but they do account for this 2% discount. 
background image  
So far, we learned the single-step Income Statement: in one mathematical subtraction 
we arrived at the Net Income.  
à Advantage: it is simple. 
à  Disadvantage:  it  is  very  limiting  in  the  information  it  gives  to  users.  It  does  not 
allow  us  to  compare  well  è  GAAP  requires  to  prepare  a  multiple-step  Income 
Statement, especially for public companies. 
 
Multiple-step Income Statement: 
Company Name  Income Statement  For the period ended   
Sales Revenue 
<Sales Discounts> 
<Sales Returns & Allowances > 
Net Sales 
è this is the first intermediary measure of success.   – Cost of Goods Sold 
Gross Profit 
– Operating expenses/ Selling, General & Administrative expenses (S,G&A) 
Income from operations/ Operating Income 
+/- Other Gains/Losses 
Income before income taxes  
– Income tax expense 
$ Net Income 
 
 
This  multiple  step  income  statement  gives  a  tremendous  amount  of  information  to 
users compared to the single-step Income Statement. 
Inventory is a big component of merchandiser’s balance sheet.  
 
In  the  real  world,  from  a  management  perspective,  dealing  with  inventory  is  very 
hard.  
 
2 drivers are always pulling inventory managers: 
1.  Drive to sell 
2.  Make  sure  we  have  enough  supply  in  stock.  à  Because  having  enough 
inventory to sell to our customers is a good thing. Managers want to get the 
customers and to keep them, so they need to have enough inventory. Problem: 
resources are scarce. Buying inventory and sticking it to the shelf represents a 
cost which is not being productive.  
à Having no inventory is as bad as having too much inventory. We need to think 
about  the  Opportunity  cost:  storage  represents  a  cost  (storage  cost,  maintenance 
cost, etc.). 
 
 
 
 
 
background image What GAAP requires when we account for inventory 
There are 4 considerations in our accounting for inventory: 
1)  Inventory  System/Method:  we  need  to  decide  which  one  we  will  use.  Perpetual vs. Periodic.  We can choose between 2 methods:  Perpetual  Inventory  System:  we  record  in  real  time  in  our  General 
Ledger every transaction that affects Inventory and COGS. Why might we 
want that? So that at any real given time, we know what our Inventory and 
COGS is.  
Periodic  Inventory  System:  we  will  capture  the  transaction  related  to 
inventory  in  temporary  buckets  related  to  our  accounting  period.  At  the 
end  of  the  accounting  period,  we  only  know  what  our  balance  is  by 
counting.  At  the  end  of  the  period,  we  will  true  up  the  ending  inventory 
balance through a physical count and adjusting entry.  
 
We will mainly talk about the perpetual method because it is the most used one in the 
real world. 
 
2)  Physical Goods: what physical goods will we include?  We include all the goods that we’ll sell (è those we purchased).  
If we buy goods on October 28 and we receive them on November 5, do we include 
them in Inventory on October 31? It depends on the Shipping/Freight Terms.  
Part of the negotiation terms deals with who pays the shipping cost, and who bares 
ownership, and therefore risk.  
 
 
There are 2 kinds: 
FOB Shipping Point: the merchandiser goes to the port and ships the goods. 
The  buyer  pays  the  shipping  cost  and  pays  the  risk  because  he  is  the  owner  of  the 
goods à in this case, we include the purchase in inventory.  
FOB  Destination:  legal  title  passes  until  the  product  arrives  at  the  buyer’s  door. 
 
The attorneys say: the person that owns the good is the one that has legal title to the 
goods, no matter if the owners physically possess them.  
 
Which one is better? It depends. If I want to increase my assets on my Balance Sheet, 
I  choose  FOB  Shipping  Point.  But  from  a  risk  point  of  view,  FOB  Destination  is 
better.  
à What about consigned goods?   They are goods sold second-hand. Who owns them? Not the store selling them. The 
store  is  only  a  vehicle  to  sell.  The  store  receives  a  percentage/commission.  This 
inventory is not in the store’s Physical Inventory. 
 
3)  Costs: what costs will we include?  The costs that we include are:   •  The purchase price  It is an increase to our Inventory account. We can include all the costs incurred to get 
the  inventory  to  the  desired  state/shape/destination  we  need  them  to  be  able  to  sell 
them.  We  put  those  costs  in  Inventory  or  capitalize  them.  à  These  are  called 
inventory costs
background image                       Inventory 
 
Beg. Inventory     
Purchase Discount  +Purchase Price   Purchase Returns&Allowances 
+Shipping 
+Insurance 
+Taxes 
 
Goods Available  
For Sale                 Cost of Goods Sold 
 
Ending Inventory 
 
 
Elements in orange : when the credit side is substracted from the debit side, we get Net  Purchases.  
 
What would the alternative be? Instead of debiting inventory, we would have to debit 
an expense account. However, it is not good for us to do this because we only debit 
the expense account when we used or sold inventory à we are in compliance with the 
Matching Principle and Expense Recognition Principle. 
 
•  Inventoriable costs  Example:  if  we  have  FOB  Shipping  Point,  we  would  want  to  pay  an  insurance  + 
shipping + taxes + refrigeration è all these costs have to be capitalized. We include 
all these as a debit to our Inventory account.  
 
à What could decrease our inventory?  -  Purchase discounts 
-  Purchase Returns and Allowances 
  4)  Cost Flow Assumption  à At what cost are we increasing or decreasing our Inventory account? 
As we purchase inventory, the unit per price fluctuates. What GAAP says: to facilitate 
the  process  of  measuring  COGS,  management  must  pick  a  Cost  Flow  Assumption. 
They come to play only to assign costs to what we sold. 
There are 4 to choose form: 
1.  FIFO: First-in-first-out 
2.  LIFO: Last-in-first-out 
3.  Weighted Average 
4.  Specific Identification 
Management will choose from one of those CFA to know how to calculate COGS. 




This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Tulane University who use StudySoup to get ahead
25 Pages 68 Views 54 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Tulane University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Tulane University
Department: Business
Course: Financial Accounting
Professor: Christine Smith
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: Inventory, Ratios, assets, PlantAssets, Accounting for Merchandising Business, LIFO, FIFO, weightedaverage, SpecificId, and receivables
Name: ACCN2010 - Study Guide 2
Description: This guide covers everything said in class as well as information from the Financial Accounting textbook. Chapter 9 is completed with the textbook.
Uploaded: 10/31/2016
25 Pages 68 Views 54 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Tulane - ACCN 2010 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Tulane - ACCN 2010 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here