Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide 2 - Updated version - Study Guide

Created by: Mikayla Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide 2 - Updated version - Study Guide

MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide 2 - Updated version - Study Guide

School: Miami University
Department: Geography
Course: Geographic Environments
Professor: Kimberly Medley
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: climate, biome, Vegetation, and Soil
Name: Study Guide 2 - Updated version
Description: These notes cover what's going to be on our next exam. The second version adds a few more details that we went over in class on Monday.
Uploaded: 11/05/2016
0 5 3 77 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 6 of a 40 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Study Guide #2 1) Define the major air mass types by source region, and dominant temperature (cold, warm, very cold…) and moisture (lots, little) characteristics. Which air masses most influence  the weather in Ohio?  What are the air masses and processes/modifications that cause  the following weather events: Indian summer, lake­effect snow, a northeaster, a polar  outbreak, an arctic outbreak? Would you expect unstable air conditions and convective  showers when Ohio is under the influence of mT or cP air?  a) Air mass: large body of air (subcontinental in size) in which temperature and moisture is fairly constant b) Source region: often major anticyclonic cells (descending and diverging air) over a  homogenous area that strongly impresses their temperature and moisture condition on the 
overlying air
c) Major air mass types: i) Continental arid (cA): ­46 degrees C, .1 moisture, very cold/dry ii) Continental polar (cP): ­11 degrees, 1.4 moisture, cold/dry iii) Maritime polar (mP): 4 degrees, 4.4 moisture, cool/moist iv) Continental tropical (cT): 24 degrees, 11 moisture, warm/dry v) Maritime tropical (mT): 24 degrees, 17 moisture, warm/moist vi) Maritime equatorial ((mE): 27 degrees, 19 moisture, warm/very moist d) Ohio air masses: i) cP ii) mP iii) mT e) indian summer i) A moving, cool, shallow polar air mass is converting into a deep, warm, 
stagnant anticyclone (high pressure) system, which has the effect of 
causing the haze and large swing in temperature between day and night.
ii) mP air reaches the Midwest from the pacific coast after crossing the 
West coast mountains and Rockies
f) lake­effect snow i) cP air (cold and dry) flows over a warm lake, increases its dewpoint, then cools to its  dewpoint when it reaches land g) northeaster i) mP air moves from the NE Atlantic to east coast h) polar outbreak i) cP air moves unusually South i) arctic outbreak i) cA air moves to midlatitudes j) mT would cause unstable air conditions and convective showers; cP air masses are usually  stable because they have high surface air pressure 2) Diagram in profile form (viewed from the side) and describe the weather conditions (cloud types, wind changes, temperature changes, and dewpoint changes) that characterize the  approach and passing of a cold front, a warm front, and an occluded front.
background image a) Cold front: i) Advancing cold air displaces warm air ii) Warm moist conditions, bank of cumulus type clouds from the Northwest, cold air forms a dense and steep front, passes quickly, followed by a cool and dry air iii) Weather conditions: (1) Warm moist air conditions ­ mT typically ­ air south ­ southeasterly (2) Steep bank of clouds ­­ cumulus to cumulonimbus (3) Fast strong uplift and storm (4) Winds shift northwest and are cool/cold and dry b) Warm front i) Advancing warm air meets and displaces cold air (generally comes from southwest) ii) Weather conditions (1) High cirrus ­ easterly ­ to northeasterly wind flow under warmer moist air (2) Storm passes slowly with thickening stratus type clouds (3) Rain or other precipitation over a long period of time c) Occluded front i) Cold front comes in and displaces warm front ii) Difference between air meeting and fronts meeting iii) Cool/drier to warm/wet to cold/dry conditions­­all the time raining from stratus type to  cumulus type clouds
background image 3) Cyclonic Storms­ Where do midlatitude cyclones occur in the Northern Hemisphere?  What factors are most important in determining the strength ("power") of a midlatitude  cyclone; what causes these storm systems to build and why do they diminish or  dissolve? What position in the curve of upper air flow supports the development of  surface low pressure systems (ie. Midlatitude cyclones)? Which direction would the wind  blow (in Oxford) if a midlatitude cyclone was approaching from its normal winter track  (and summer track) toward Ohio?  Know the weather conditions associated with the  passing of a midlatitude cyclone in the open stage. Why are the passing of these storms  always associated with changes in wind flow?  a) Mean tracks shift from southern Rockies in winter to northern Rockies in summer in the  relation to the position of the polar front b) Strength factors i) Air mass temperature contrasts between the 2 air masses ­ greater pressure gradient,  greater wind flow ii) Upper air support ­ how fast the winds are in the upper air iii) dew point (moisture) of the warm air mass ­ that energy is released with condensation c) build and dissolve i) the line convergence along the polar front can develop a wave­form for reasons that are  related to wind flow in the upper troposphere
(1) at this bend, warm air is pushing poleward and cold air is pushing equatorward with a
low­pressure center at the location where the two fronts are joined (2) as the contrasting air masses compete for position, clouds and precipitation increase  along the warm front, but more intense ii) cyclogenesis: from a stationary front along the polar front (subsolar low) to the  development of a low center iii) open stage (1) east wind ­ cooler, dry air (2) warm from precipitation conditions (3) winds become southerly ­ warm and moist (4) cold front precipitation (5) cold dry air and winds typically northwesterly iv) occluded stage (1) cold front in a mid­latitude cyclone advances and overtakes the warm front ­­ the  warm air is uplifted v) dissolving stage (1) the temperature, pressure, and humidity differences that powered the storm diminish  at the occluded front d) in the westerlies, along polar front e) would blow counterclockwise 4) Differentiate among midlatitude cyclones, tornadoes, and hurricanes (tropical cyclones)  by their sizes, strengths, and factors important for their formation. a) Midlatitude cyclones above b) Tornadoes: small intense cyclonic flow, usually along a cold front (about 200 m width) i) Big temperature contrasts ii) Lots of upper air support
background image iii) Lots of moisture in the warm air mass c) Hurricanes (Atlantic) / Typhoons / Tropical Cyclones i) Upper air support­subtropical jet ii) Lots of warm moist air d) Thunderstorm­local storm of intense convection i) Lightning and thunder­freezing in the upper cloud creates positive charges with negative  below that can be sufficient to generate an electrical charge ii) Freezing crystals attract water vapor to induce lots of precipitation and/or hail iii) Localized conditions of low pressure and an unstable air parcel  5) Why is the weather in Ohio so much more interesting than in the equatorial and polar  zones? a) More air masses influence Ohio than the equatorial and polar zones 1) What are some key attributes used to describe climates? What are the relationships  between temperature and evapotranspiration? What are the relationships between  evapotranspiration, precipitation, and water availability?  a) Global conditions of solar energy receipt (insolation), circulation, and energy transfer create  weather conditions. Climate is the average atmospheric conditions over time b) Temperature: i) Averages­­relate to insolation directly with latitude; they also relate to marine versus  continent) ii) Seasonal changes:  (1) Higher latitudes, more continental (2) Lower latitude; more marine c) Precipitation (PPT) i) Average (mean) (1) Locations of high rainfall (2) Locations of low rainfall ii) Seasonal changes (1) More precipitation versus less (2) Distinct periods of high rainfall and low
background image (3) Summer wet, winter drier versus winter wet, summer drier d) Moisture: availability of water i) Relationship between how much is received and how much is needed ii) Water needs = evapotranspiration (PET, Evaporation, and Transpiration) iii) Humid­ PPT > PET iv) Arid­ PPT < PET e) Evapotranspiration: combined water loss to the atmosphere from ground and water surfaces  by evaporation and from plants by transpiration i) As temperatures increase, transpiration also goes up. This occurs because
as warmer air surrounds a plant, its stoma (the openings where water is 
released) open. Cooler temperatures cause the stoma to close; releasing 
less water. This lowers the rate of transpiration. As evapotranspiration is 
the sum of transpiration and evaporation, when transpiration decreases, 
so too does evapotranspiration.
ii) Relative  humidity  (the amount of  water vapor  in the air) is also an  important consideration in evapotranspiration rates because as the air 
becomes more and more saturated, less water is able to evaporate into 
that air. Therefore, as the relative humidity increases transpiration 
decreases.
2) Define the truly active factors used by Köppen to distinguish the limit of tree growth (D to  E climates), the limit for tropical evergreen plants, the transition toward temperate  broadleaved deciduous trees, and the arid climates. How are seasonal changes in  moisture availability shown graphically using the Walter diagrams? a) Tropical  i) No frost  ii) Always warm (<18 degrees C) b) Subtropical i) Chance of frost ii) Monthly mean can drop to 10 degrees C no temp below 0 degrees C
background image c) Temperate i) At least 1 month below freezing ii) At least one month greater than 10 degrees (tree line) d) Arctic i) No month greater than 10 degrees C e) Arid i) PPT < PET ii) Insufficient water to meet water needs   3) For each climate type know: the distinguishing characteristics of temperature, moisture,  seasonality, frost; global processes (e.g., air pressure, global circulation) that explain  each geographic distribution; air mass types and characteristics; representative climate  diagrams; and geographic distribution. Note you must be able to interpret the climate 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Miami University who use StudySoup to get ahead
40 Pages 83 Views 66 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Miami University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Miami University
Department: Geography
Course: Geographic Environments
Professor: Kimberly Medley
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: climate, biome, Vegetation, and Soil
Name: Study Guide 2 - Updated version
Description: These notes cover what's going to be on our next exam. The second version adds a few more details that we went over in class on Monday.
Uploaded: 11/05/2016
40 Pages 83 Views 66 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here