Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

ND - For 10000 - Study Guide - Midterm

Created by: Faith Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > ND - For 10000 - Study Guide - Midterm

ND - For 10000 - Study Guide - Midterm

School: University of Notre Dame
Department: Foreign Language
Course: Introductory Psychology First Year
Professor: Kalchik and Venter
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Psych Key Concepts for Exam 3
Description: These are key concepts from the text (chapters 8, 11, and 12) for the third exam. Chapter 15 not included.
Uploaded: 11/13/2016
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 7 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Psych Exam 3 I. Concepts and Categories a. Concept – the mental representation of an object, event, or idea i. Priming – the activation of individual concepts in LTM 1. Lexical decision task – test for priming; volunteer at a computer  stares at a focal point till a string of letters flash on a screen and  they must say whether it spelled a word ii. Graded membership – the observation that some concepts appear to make  better category members than others iii. Semantic network – an interconnected set of nodes (or concepts) and the  links that join them to form a category iv. Nodes – circles that represent concepts v. Links – connect them together to represent the structure of a category as  well as relationships among different categories b. Category – the clusters of interrelated concepts i. Rule­based categorization aka classical categorization – the process of  identifying category members according to a set of rules or a set of 
defining features
ii. Prototypes – mental representations of an average category member iii. Exemplar – a specific category that serves as a reference point for the  entire category iv. Basic level category: 1. Terms used most often in conversation
2. Easiest to pronounce
3. Level at which prototypes exist
4. Level at which most thinking occurs
c. Linguistic relativity aka Whorfian hypothesis – the proposal that the language we  use determines how we perceive the world II. Defining and Problem Solving
a. Problem solving – accomplishing a goal when the solution or path to the solution 
is not clear b. Three features of problem solving i. The initial state – what the condition is at the outset of a problem ii. Goal state – what you need or desire as an outcome iii. Obstacles – things in the way of your goal 1. Cognitive obstacles – one that is based on how you understand a  problem or how innovative you can be in finding a solution a. Mental set – cognitive obstacle that occurs when an  individual attempts to apply a routine solution to what is 
actually a new type of problem
iv. Operators – the techniques we use to reach the goal state 1. Functional fixedness – occurs when an individual encounters a  potential operator but can think of only its most obvious function
background image c. Ill­defined problem – lacks definition in one or more ways and does not have a  definite goal state d. Well­defined problem – has a specific goal state
e. Algorithms – problem­solving strategies based on a series of clearly defined steps 
or rules f. Heuristics – problem­solving strategies that stem from prior experiences and  provide an educated guess as to what is the most likely solution i. Representative heuristic – making judgements of likelihood based on how  well an example represents a specific category ii. Availability heuristic – estimating the frequency of an event based on how easily examples of it come to mind III. Judgement and Decision Making a. Anchoring effect – occurs when an individual attempts to solve a problem  involving numbers and uses previous knowledge to keep the response within a  limited range b. Brief perseverance – when an individual believes he has the solution to the  problem and accepts only evidence that will confirm those beliefs c. Confirmation bias – occurs when an individual searches for only evidence that  will confirm his or her beliefs instead or disconfirming evidence d. Satisficers – people who make decisions that are just “good enough” e. Maximizers – people who attempt to evaluate every option for every choice until  they find the perfect fit f. Paradox of choice – the observation that more choices can lead to less satisfaction IV. Social and Achievement Motivation a. The need to belong aka affiliation motivation – the motivation to maintain  relationships that involve pleasant feelings such as warmth, affection,  appreciation, and mutual concern for each person’s well­being b. People need a sense of permanence  c. Social connectedness is a good predictor of health
d. Terror management theory – psychological perspective asserting that the human 
fear of mortality motivates behavior, particularly those that preserve self­esteem 
and sense of belonging
e. Achievement motivation – the drive to perform at high levels and to accomplish  significant goals f. Mastery motives – reflect a desire to understand or overcome a challenge
g. Performance motives – geared toward gaining rewards or public recognition
h. Approach goals – enjoyable and pleasant incentives that we are drawn toward  such as praise or financial reward i. Avoidance goals – unpleasant outcomes such as shame, embarrassment, or  emotional pain, which we try to avoid V. Emotion
a. Involves three components
i. Subjective thoughts and experiences (Cognition) ii. Accompanying patterns of physical arousal (Arousal)
background image iii. Characteristic behavioral expressions (Behavior) b. Autonomic nervous system – conveys info between the spinal cord, blood vessels, glands, and smooth muscles of the body i. Sympathetic nervous system – increases energy and alertness to enable  you to handle dangerous situations (fight or flight) ii. Parasympathetic nervous system – uses energy more sparingly and  restores body back to resting rates, focusing on nonemergency tasks like 
digestion
iii. Limbic system – critical to emotional processing 1. Hippocampus 2. Hypothalamus
3. Amygdala – assessing and interpreting situations to determine 
which types of emotions are appropriate; connected to the 
physiological responses
iv. More activity in right frontal lobe – depression v. More activity in left frontal lobe – happiness c. Theories i. James­Lange theory of emotion – our physiological reactions to stimuli  precede and give rise to the emotional experience (the racing heart causes 
fear)
ii. Cannon­Bard theory of emotion – the emotions such as fear or happiness  occur simultaneously with their physiological components iii. Schachter’s two­factor theory of emotion – patterns of physical arousal  and the cognitive labels we attach to them form the basis of our emotional  experiences d. Expressing emotion i. Emotional dialects – variations across cultures in how common emotions  are expressed ii. Display rules – the unwritten expectations we have regarding when it is  appropriate to show a certain emotion iii. Facial feedback hypothesis – a prediction that if emotional expressions  influence subjective emotional experiences, then the act of forming a  facial expression should elicit the specific corresponding emotion VI. Personality – a characteristic pattern of thinking, interacting, and reacting that is  unique to everyone, and remains relatively consistent over time and situations
a. Ways to study personality
i. Idiographic approach – focus on creating detailed descriptions of  individuals and their unique personality characteristics ii. Nomothetic approach – examines personality in large groups of people,  with the aim of making generalizations about personality structure b. Trait perspective – describes personality based on how well each of these traits  describes a specific person i. Personality traits – labels applied to specific attributes of personality, such  as “reserved,” “cheerful,” “outgoing”

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Notre Dame who use StudySoup to get ahead
7 Pages 28 Views 22 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Notre Dame who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Notre Dame
Department: Foreign Language
Course: Introductory Psychology First Year
Professor: Kalchik and Venter
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Psych Key Concepts for Exam 3
Description: These are key concepts from the text (chapters 8, 11, and 12) for the third exam. Chapter 15 not included.
Uploaded: 11/13/2016
7 Pages 28 Views 22 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to ND - PSY 10000 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to ND - PSY 10000 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here