×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UO - PSY 201 - Study Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UO - PSY 201 - Study Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

UO / Political Science / PS 201 / What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?

What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?

What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?

Description

School: University of Oregon
Department: Political Science
Course: Psychology
Professor: Sereno
Term: Winter 2015
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: ps 201 final exam study guide
Description: Prompt 4: What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?  What  would Hamilton think? In answering, tell us what are the chief sources of presidential  power, and describe how it has it developed over time
Uploaded: 04/07/2015
12 Pages 39 Views 3 Unlocks
Reviews

Roscoe Hettinger (Rating: )

What an unbelievable resource! I probably needed course on how to decipher my own handwriting, but not anymore...



Prompt 4: What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?  What  would Hamilton think? In answering, tell us what are the chief sources of presidential  power, and describe how it has it developed over time.


What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?



I Sources of Presidential Power

a Chief Executive

i Appointment and Removal Power

ii Budgeting

iii Law Enforcment

iv Clemency

b Legislative 

i Veto

ii Legislateive Proposals, came with FDR’s New Deal in 1933, model for the 

office, duty to recommend legislation

iii Executive Orders: implied powers doctrine, construed as a presidential directive  that becomes law without prior congressional approval We also discuss several other topics like A functional unit of skeletal muscle is?
If you want to learn more check out Who is the mockingbird players?

iv Emergency Powers: in times of crisis, presidents often claim extraordinary 

powers to preserve the nation

1 Abraham Lincoln during Civil War

2 Harry Truman, after North Korea invaded South Korea he ordered the 


How does foreign policy get made?



seizure of strike­threatened steel mills to avoid potential shortages 

(Supreme Court later ruled that this was unconstitutional)

3 George W. Bush’s response to 9/11/2001: authorizes the use of military

tribunals for trying foreiners accused of terrorists acts against the 

United States

a Emergency powers under the commander­in­chief clause gave

him latitutde If you want to learn more check out Genetic variation exists in?

c Foreign Affairs

i Treaty Powers

1 Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 gives the president power to make 

treaties with other countries, subject to ratification by a two­thirds 

majority of the Senate, obvious division of power

2 Executive branch established itself as a dominant branch in treaty 


How are political parties organized in the us, and how do us parties differ from other democracies?



making

3 1980, Jimmy Carter withdrew the SALT II treaty with the Soviet Union If you want to learn more check out What effect does adding 45 ml of nh3 (density 730 g/ml) to 100 ml water (density 1 g/ml) at 25 ºc have on the solution’s vapor pressure?

from Senate consideration after Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan

ii Executive Agreements

iii Recognition and Appointment Powers

d Commander in Chief

i Nations highest civilian officer 

e Chief of State

i Ceremonial functions

Prompt 5: How does foreign policy get made? Is it good that the process is closed off  from other branches and the public? Why or why not? 

I. Introduction

a. The United States Constitution outlines control of foreign policy by  designating control to both the President and Congress. This is often 

described as an “invitation to struggle” between the two powers of the  government in making of foreign policy. The US, in comparison to every  other liberal, modern, democracy, conducts and forms foreign policy in an  often complicated and inefficient manner.  Don't forget about the age old question of What are the different parts of a living cell?

b. In the United States, the making of foreign policy is based off the  participation and opinions upheld by the President, the executive branch,  Congress and the Public. However, the implementation and conduction of  foreign policy is essentially restricted to the executive branch. 

II. The Senate

a. Congress – most democratic of the three branches

i. Power of the purse – power to tax and control government 

spending

1. President cannot spend money not appropriated by 

Congress

2. Latitude allowed in states of war, and other emergencies

ii. The constitution assigns the Senate a role to advise the President in negotiating agreements, to consent to them when they receive  Don't forget about the age old question of What are the two types of reasoning?

approval by the President, and to approve presidential 

appointments

1. Presidential appointments often regard international 

representatives:

2. Secretary of state, high officials of the State Department, 

ambassadors, and career foreign service officers.

iii. Transformation after Vietnam War: Congress becomes more  involved in foreign affairs because of distrust of the President’s 

office

iv. President Obama’s military action in Libya sidestepped the War  Power’s Resolution, an example of how presidents have found 

ways around requirements that insist on Congress’ approval.

III. The President

a.  Head of State

i. In most other governments, these two are separate positions filled  by different individuals.

ii. As the head of state, the president is the primary voice of 

representation of the entire United States to the world.

b. Head of Government

i. Formulates foreign policy and supervises its implementation

ii. Organizes the departments and agencies that play a part in the  foreign policy process

c. Commander in Chief

i. Of navy and army

ii. Subject to the consent of the Senate, he nominates and appoints  ambassadors;

iii. Makes treaties with two thirds vote of the Senate

iv. Executive agreements:

Prompt 2: How are political parties organized in the US, and how do US parties differ  from other democracies?  Give three examples of party realignments in US political  history. If there was realignment now, what might cause it?

Outline

I. Introduction

a. Political parties are a core feature of the United States political 

atmosphere. 

b. Like many democracies, United States political parties are organized  groups that attempt to influence the government by electing their members to important government offices. However, unlike many modern 

democracies, the United States embraces the two­party system. Although  many third parties emerged, the two­party system has dominated 

American politics since the 19th century, where Democrats and 

Republicans really manifested as the major party players. 

c. The relationship between political parties and government far extends  agenda setting.

i. Political parties 

d. As a response and result to present issues, the American two­party system  has experienced, at least, five points of electoral realignment—the points  in history when a new party supplants the ruling party, becoming in turn  the dominant political force. In the United States, this has tended to occur  roughly every 30 years. Begininng with the Federalists and Jeffersonians,  the next realignment happened between Democrats and Whigs, when  Andrew Jackson reinvigorated the democratic party base in the south and  west; the Civil War era led to realignment of the democratic and 

republican parties 

II. The First Party System

a. Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans

i. Emerged in the 1790s

b. Federalists: mainly New England merchants, supported a program of  protective tariffs to encourage:

i. manufacturing, 

ii. assumption of the states’ Revolutionary war debts,

iii. the creation of a national bank,

iv. and resumption of commercial ties with Britain.

c. Jeffersonians: mainly southern agricultural interests, opposed Federalist’s  policies and favored:

i. Free trade,

ii. The promotion of agricultural over commercial interests, and

iii. Friendship with France.

d. Jeffersionians gradually expanded their base from the South into the  Middle Atlantic states; Federalists gradually weakened after the election  of 1800 in which incumbent, John Adams, was defeated by Thomas  Jefferson.

e. Federalists disappeared after the War of 1812, when they faced charges of  treason.

f. Until the 1830s, Americans only had one political party: the Jeffersonian  Republicans, who became known as the Democrats, this is commonly  called the Era of Good Feelings…

g. However, there was inner factional conflict within the Democratic Party,  which would lead to the Second Party System. The conflict regarded  General Andrew Jackson.

i. Jackson won presidency of 1828 and 1832, 

ii. By espousing programs of free trade and policies that appealed to  the Southern and Western regions

h. Second Party System: Democrats and Whigs

III. The New Deal Party System

a. Proceeding the New Deal Party System:

i. The economy collapsed under Herbert Hoover, a republican who  won the 1928 presidential election. 

ii. In the 1932 presidential election, democratic Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected, along with a solidly Democratic Congress—

Americans proved unimpressed with the Republican response to 

economic recovery.

iii. New Deal: the size and reach of America’s national government  greatly increases; designed many programs to expand the 

Democratic Party’s base by: rebuilding and revitalizing the party 

around a center of

1. Unionized workers,

2. Upper­middle class intellectuals,

3. Professionals

4. Southern farmers,

5. Jews, Catholics, and

6. African Americans

iv.

Prompt 4: What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?  What  would Hamilton think? In answering, tell us what are the chief sources of presidential  power, and describe how it has it developed over time.

I. Sources of Presidential Power

a. Chief Executive

i. Appointment and Removal Power

ii. Budgeting

iii. Law Enforcment

iv. Clemency

b. Legislative 

i. Veto

ii. Legislateive Proposals, came with FDR’s New Deal in 1933,  model for the office, duty to recommend legislation

iii. Executive Orders: implied powers doctrine, construed as a 

presidential directive that becomes law without prior congressional approval

iv. Emergency Powers: in times of crisis, presidents often claim  extraordinary powers to preserve the nation

1. Abraham Lincoln during Civil War

2. Harry Truman, after North Korea invaded South Korea he 

ordered the seizure of strike­threatened steel mills to avoid 

potential shortages (Supreme Court later ruled that this was

unconstitutional)

3. George W. Bush’s response to 9/11/2001: authorizes the 

use of military tribunals for trying foreiners accused of 

terrorists acts against the United States

a. Emergency powers under the commander­in­chief 

clause gave him latitutde

c. Foreign Affairs

i. Treaty Powers

1. Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 gives the president power to 

make treaties with other countries, subject to ratification by

a two­thirds majority of the Senate, obvious division of 

power

2. Executive branch established itself as a dominant branch in 

treaty making

3. 1980, Jimmy Carter withdrew the SALT II treaty with the 

Soviet Union from Senate consideration after Soviet troops 

invaded Afghanistan

ii. Executive Agreements

iii. Recognition and Appointment Powers

d. Commander in Chief

i. Nations highest civilian officer 

e. Chief of State

i. Ceremonial functions

Prompt 4: What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?  What  would Hamilton think? In answering, tell us what are the chief sources of presidential  power, and describe how it has it developed over time.

I Sources of Presidential Power

a Chief Executive

i Appointment and Removal Power

ii Budgeting

iii Law Enforcment

iv Clemency

b Legislative 

i Veto

ii Legislateive Proposals, came with FDR’s New Deal in 1933, model for the 

office, duty to recommend legislation

iii Executive Orders: implied powers doctrine, construed as a presidential directive  that becomes law without prior congressional approval

iv Emergency Powers: in times of crisis, presidents often claim extraordinary 

powers to preserve the nation

1 Abraham Lincoln during Civil War

2 Harry Truman, after North Korea invaded South Korea he ordered the 

seizure of strike­threatened steel mills to avoid potential shortages 

(Supreme Court later ruled that this was unconstitutional)

3 George W. Bush’s response to 9/11/2001: authorizes the use of military

tribunals for trying foreiners accused of terrorists acts against the 

United States

a Emergency powers under the commander­in­chief clause gave

him latitutde

c Foreign Affairs

i Treaty Powers

1 Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 gives the president power to make 

treaties with other countries, subject to ratification by a two­thirds 

majority of the Senate, obvious division of power

2 Executive branch established itself as a dominant branch in treaty 

making

3 1980, Jimmy Carter withdrew the SALT II treaty with the Soviet Union

from Senate consideration after Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan

ii Executive Agreements

iii Recognition and Appointment Powers

d Commander in Chief

i Nations highest civilian officer 

e Chief of State

i Ceremonial functions

Prompt 5: How does foreign policy get made? Is it good that the process is closed off  from other branches and the public? Why or why not? 

I. Introduction

a. The United States Constitution outlines control of foreign policy by  designating control to both the President and Congress. This is often 

described as an “invitation to struggle” between the two powers of the  government in making of foreign policy. The US, in comparison to every  other liberal, modern, democracy, conducts and forms foreign policy in an  often complicated and inefficient manner. 

b. In the United States, the making of foreign policy is based off the  participation and opinions upheld by the President, the executive branch,  Congress and the Public. However, the implementation and conduction of  foreign policy is essentially restricted to the executive branch. 

II. The Senate

a. Congress – most democratic of the three branches

i. Power of the purse – power to tax and control government 

spending

1. President cannot spend money not appropriated by 

Congress

2. Latitude allowed in states of war, and other emergencies

ii. The constitution assigns the Senate a role to advise the President in negotiating agreements, to consent to them when they receive 

approval by the President, and to approve presidential 

appointments

1. Presidential appointments often regard international 

representatives:

2. Secretary of state, high officials of the State Department, 

ambassadors, and career foreign service officers.

iii. Transformation after Vietnam War: Congress becomes more  involved in foreign affairs because of distrust of the President’s 

office

iv. President Obama’s military action in Libya sidestepped the War  Power’s Resolution, an example of how presidents have found 

ways around requirements that insist on Congress’ approval.

III. The President

a.  Head of State

i. In most other governments, these two are separate positions filled  by different individuals.

ii. As the head of state, the president is the primary voice of 

representation of the entire United States to the world.

b. Head of Government

i. Formulates foreign policy and supervises its implementation

ii. Organizes the departments and agencies that play a part in the  foreign policy process

c. Commander in Chief

i. Of navy and army

ii. Subject to the consent of the Senate, he nominates and appoints  ambassadors;

iii. Makes treaties with two thirds vote of the Senate

iv. Executive agreements:

Prompt 2: How are political parties organized in the US, and how do US parties differ  from other democracies?  Give three examples of party realignments in US political  history. If there was realignment now, what might cause it?

Outline

I. Introduction

a. Political parties are a core feature of the United States political 

atmosphere. 

b. Like many democracies, United States political parties are organized  groups that attempt to influence the government by electing their members to important government offices. However, unlike many modern 

democracies, the United States embraces the two­party system. Although  many third parties emerged, the two­party system has dominated 

American politics since the 19th century, where Democrats and 

Republicans really manifested as the major party players. 

c. The relationship between political parties and government far extends  agenda setting.

i. Political parties 

d. As a response and result to present issues, the American two­party system  has experienced, at least, five points of electoral realignment—the points  in history when a new party supplants the ruling party, becoming in turn  the dominant political force. In the United States, this has tended to occur  roughly every 30 years. Begininng with the Federalists and Jeffersonians,  the next realignment happened between Democrats and Whigs, when  Andrew Jackson reinvigorated the democratic party base in the south and  west; the Civil War era led to realignment of the democratic and 

republican parties 

II. The First Party System

a. Federalists and Jeffersonian Republicans

i. Emerged in the 1790s

b. Federalists: mainly New England merchants, supported a program of  protective tariffs to encourage:

i. manufacturing, 

ii. assumption of the states’ Revolutionary war debts,

iii. the creation of a national bank,

iv. and resumption of commercial ties with Britain.

c. Jeffersonians: mainly southern agricultural interests, opposed Federalist’s  policies and favored:

i. Free trade,

ii. The promotion of agricultural over commercial interests, and

iii. Friendship with France.

d. Jeffersionians gradually expanded their base from the South into the  Middle Atlantic states; Federalists gradually weakened after the election  of 1800 in which incumbent, John Adams, was defeated by Thomas  Jefferson.

e. Federalists disappeared after the War of 1812, when they faced charges of  treason.

f. Until the 1830s, Americans only had one political party: the Jeffersonian  Republicans, who became known as the Democrats, this is commonly  called the Era of Good Feelings…

g. However, there was inner factional conflict within the Democratic Party,  which would lead to the Second Party System. The conflict regarded  General Andrew Jackson.

i. Jackson won presidency of 1828 and 1832, 

ii. By espousing programs of free trade and policies that appealed to  the Southern and Western regions

h. Second Party System: Democrats and Whigs

III. The New Deal Party System

a. Proceeding the New Deal Party System:

i. The economy collapsed under Herbert Hoover, a republican who  won the 1928 presidential election. 

ii. In the 1932 presidential election, democratic Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected, along with a solidly Democratic Congress—

Americans proved unimpressed with the Republican response to 

economic recovery.

iii. New Deal: the size and reach of America’s national government  greatly increases; designed many programs to expand the 

Democratic Party’s base by: rebuilding and revitalizing the party 

around a center of

1. Unionized workers,

2. Upper­middle class intellectuals,

3. Professionals

4. Southern farmers,

5. Jews, Catholics, and

6. African Americans

iv.

Prompt 4: What would the antifederalists think about presidential power today?  What  would Hamilton think? In answering, tell us what are the chief sources of presidential  power, and describe how it has it developed over time.

I. Sources of Presidential Power

a. Chief Executive

i. Appointment and Removal Power

ii. Budgeting

iii. Law Enforcment

iv. Clemency

b. Legislative 

i. Veto

ii. Legislateive Proposals, came with FDR’s New Deal in 1933,  model for the office, duty to recommend legislation

iii. Executive Orders: implied powers doctrine, construed as a 

presidential directive that becomes law without prior congressional approval

iv. Emergency Powers: in times of crisis, presidents often claim  extraordinary powers to preserve the nation

1. Abraham Lincoln during Civil War

2. Harry Truman, after North Korea invaded South Korea he 

ordered the seizure of strike­threatened steel mills to avoid 

potential shortages (Supreme Court later ruled that this was

unconstitutional)

3. George W. Bush’s response to 9/11/2001: authorizes the 

use of military tribunals for trying foreiners accused of 

terrorists acts against the United States

a. Emergency powers under the commander­in­chief 

clause gave him latitutde

c. Foreign Affairs

i. Treaty Powers

1. Article II, Section 2, Clause 2 gives the president power to 

make treaties with other countries, subject to ratification by

a two­thirds majority of the Senate, obvious division of 

power

2. Executive branch established itself as a dominant branch in 

treaty making

3. 1980, Jimmy Carter withdrew the SALT II treaty with the 

Soviet Union from Senate consideration after Soviet troops 

invaded Afghanistan

ii. Executive Agreements

iii. Recognition and Appointment Powers

d. Commander in Chief

i. Nations highest civilian officer 

e. Chief of State

i. Ceremonial functions

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here