×
Log in to StudySoup

Forgot password? Reset password here

University of Louisiana at Lafayette - GEOL 105 - Geology 10 Final

Created by: Lauren Lawson Elite Notetaker

Schools > University of Louisiana at Lafayette > Geology > GEOL 105 > University of Louisiana at Lafayette - GEOL 105 - Geology 10 Final

University of Louisiana at Lafayette - GEOL 105 - Geology 10 Final

School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Geology
Course: Geology and Man
Professor: Jennifer Hargrave
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Geology, final, rocks, sediment, Volcano, EARTH, man, humans, Metamorphic Rocks, Metamorphism, igneous, and Mountain Building
Name: Geology 10 Final Exam
Description: The study guide for the Final on Dec. 9th at 8am. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at lvl9835@louisiana.edu Good Luck and Happy Holidays!
Uploaded: 12/02/2016
0 5 3 26 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 10 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Geology Study Guide: Final Exam Chapter 9: Earthquake­ the vibration of Earth produce by the rapid release of energy.  elastic rebound theory­ States that our plates/fault lines are elastic that can bend and 
build up strain until is no longer can hold, and then there is a sudden release of energy 
(the earthquake). The build up of energy takes tens to hundreds of years, but an 
earthquake takes seconds to a few minutes. The buildup of strain and the release of 
energy describe how an earthquake works. 
epicenter­ above the Earth’s surface, hypocenter is below the Earth’s surface
focus­ Where an Earthquake begins (also called hypocenter)
geothermal gradient­ increase in temperature as you go deeper into the Earth, it’s hotter 
towards the core. 
intensity­ measure of the severity of damage. Measured by Mercalli Scale
Love wave (L­wave)­ waves that move back/forth (surface waves)
Magnitude­ the amount of energy that is released as the rock breaks (ground movement).
Measured by the Richter Scale. 
Modified Mercalli Scale­ measurements of the amount of intensity of an earthquake 
P­wave – primary waves that are the first to arrive. Fastest waves and travel through 
solids, liquids, and gasses. (Body Wave)
Rayleigh wave (R­wave)­ waves that move up and down (surface wave)
Richter Magnitude Scale­ logarithmic scale used to measure the magnitude of an Earth 
quake
. Measured in thousands. Seismograph­ instrument that records seismic waves Seismology­ the study of seismic activity within the Earth 
Seismicity­ the occurrence or frequency of earthquakes in a region. 
S­wave – second waves to arrive. They travel only through solids. (Body Wave)
S­wave shadow zone­ an area where the S waves are not received. Through this we 
know that the inner core is liquid. 
Tsunami­ seismic sea waves, usually happens after an earthquake
­Causes of earthquakes
Sudden slip along a fault (most common), sudden motion along newly formed crustal 
fault, a sudden change in mineral structure, movement of magma in a volcano, volcanic 
eruption, giant landslide, meteorite impact, nuclear detonation
. ­Seismology
It takes a minimum of 3 seismographs to measure an earthquake.
Branch of science concerned with earthquakes/seismic waves and related phenomenon. 
­Types of seismic waves
Body Waves­ occur below the Earth’s surface. S waves(back/forth motion) and P Waves 
(push­pull, compress and expand motion). 
background image Surface Waves­ waves on Earth’s surface. L waves (move back and forth) and R waves 
(move up and down). 
­ Intensity vs. magnitude
Intensity­ measured by Mercalli Scale and measures the severity/damage of the 
earthquake
Magnitude­ measured by the Richter Scale and measures the amount of energy released 
as the rocks break (amount of ground motion)
­ Tectonic environments
Earthquakes are linked to tectonic plate boundaries. 
Most occur in the Ring of Fire or the Circum­Pacific Belt (subduction zone)
­Hazards
Ground shaking, Roads collapsing, bridges topple, masonry (bricks) walls break apart
Liquefaction: waves liquefy water­filled sediments (quicksand/quickclay/sand volcanoes)
­ Prediction
Short range predictions­ NO.
Long range predictions­KINDA By:
Reoccurrence Interval (average time between seismic events), historical records, 
geological evidence that requires radiometric dating. 
Seismic Gap­ segments of a fault zone that have not had a recent seismic occurrence. 
­­­­­
Mitigation Lessening the intensity or severity of an Earthquake. 
Anchor bolt/ Cable, Cross Beams, Rollers/Springs to lessen the impact of earthquakes. 
Safety measures.  Chapter 10: Anticline­ a fold that looks like an A. Beds dip away from each other. Oldest rocks of 
anticline are in the middle
. Basin­ double plunging syncline.  Compressional stress­  form folds, pushing together of rocks (convergent)
continental accretion­ adding to continental material by plates running into each other
deformation­ rocks being deformed due to stress. 3 types (Compressional, Tensional, 
Shear)
dip­ the angle/direction that a bed is tilted. The maximum angle of an inclined plane. 
dome­ double plunging anticline 
fault­ crack or a fracture of the Earth. Brittle deformation 
fold­ Layers that are bent by slow plastic flow. Formed by compression, meaning it has 
been shortened. Ductile Deformation
footwall­ wall of fault that resembles a wall you could climb.
Fracture­  is any separation in a geologic formation, such as a joint or a  fault that divides the rock into two or more pieces.  hanging wall­ fault wall that resembles a wall you could hang from. moves down in a 
tensional environment (normal fault)
  
background image isostatic rebound­ rebounding from where erosion is taking place  joint­ fractures (cracks) where there is no rock offset (have not moved, just cracked­ 
similar to weathering) From in response to compression, tension, and shearing.
monocline – folds that only have one limb (not anticline or syncline like)
normal fault­ extension, hanging wall moves down 
orogeny­ the process of mountain building
principle of isostasy­  mountains are uplifted from underneath the surface as their tops 
are weathered away. 
reverse fault­ hanging wall moves up. Goes against gravity. Shortening
shear stress­ sliding past each other, (transform)
stress­ the forces that deform rocks
Principle of Original Horizontality­ rocks are originally laid down horizontally. 
strike­ perpendicular. The intersection of a horizontal plane with an inclined plane 
strike­slip fault­ shear stress, hanging wall moves to the side
syncline­ a fold that looks like a smile. Beds dip inward/towards each other. The 
youngest rocks are in the middle
tensional stress­ moving away from each other, stretching/thinning  (divergent
exotic terrane­ crustal thickening happens when land from other plate boundaries 
collides with a continent.
  thrust fault­ low angle (horizontal) reverse fault, hanging wall moves up  Evidence of tectonic activity 
Geological processes of Uplift, Metamorphism, and Deformation 
What is deformation? 
General term that refers to all changes in he original form and/or size of a rock body
3 types of deformation
compressional, tensional, shear 
Brittle vs. ductile 
Brittle­ rocks that break into smaller pieces as a result of stress­ It’s breakable 
(faults/joints)
Ductile­ type of solid­state flow that produces a change in shape of an object without 
fracturing­ it’s bendable (folds, domes, basins)
Causes of continental deformation
Stress, weathering, erosion, subdution, plate tectonics
Isostasy­ Gravitational balance of mountains. As the top of mountains are weathered, 
there is a rebound effect that happens from underneath the surface and the mountains are 
uplifted. 
Chapter 12: Abrasion­ the “sandblasting” of rock by the particles in fast moving water­ eroding

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Louisiana at Lafayette who use StudySoup to get ahead
10 Pages 116 Views 92 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Louisiana at Lafayette who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Department: Geology
Course: Geology and Man
Professor: Jennifer Hargrave
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Geology, final, rocks, sediment, Volcano, EARTH, man, humans, Metamorphic Rocks, Metamorphism, igneous, and Mountain Building
Name: Geology 10 Final Exam
Description: The study guide for the Final on Dec. 9th at 8am. If you have any questions, feel free to contact me at lvl9835@louisiana.edu Good Luck and Happy Holidays!
Uploaded: 12/02/2016
10 Pages 116 Views 92 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to University of Louisiana at Lafayette - GEOL 105 - Study Guide
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here