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UT - ARC 318 - World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present

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Schools > University of Texas at Austin > Architecture > ARC 318 > UT - ARC 318 - World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present

UT - ARC 318 - World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present

School: University of Texas at Austin
Department: Architecture
Course: World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present
Professor: Richard Cleary
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: World History, Architecture of Continents, and Architecture
Name: World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present Final Exam Study Guid
Description: This study guide gives basic outlines for each essay question and also contains flash cards of the slide IDs.
Uploaded: 12/03/2016
0 5 3 68 Reviews
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background image World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Modernity FINAL Study Guide 1. During the first decades of the 20th century, groups of architects and artists 
published manifestos, organized exhibitions, and held meetings proclaiming 
themselves the avant-garde of modernity. Select two examples of the groups we 
have studied and explain the formal, social, and, if applicable, political dimensions 
of their manifestos. Be specific as you link the texts and works to social contexts. 
- Futurists - Constructivists - De Stijl o Look at essay on De Stijl
o Different way of thinking about rooms
- Werkbund - Find a building for each! 2. Throughout much of the 20th century (and into the present century), 
architectural theorists and practitioners variously found inspiration in nature 
(natural surroundings, biological growth/change) and technology (machines and 
processes). Discuss how individual architects or groups engaged with these two 
categories in their work and writings. Please use at least one example for the 
discussion of each category.
- Frank Lloyd Wright - Gaudi o Art Nouveau - Le Corbusier for tech o Chandigar assembly building in India 3. The Museum of Modern Art’s modern architecture exhibition of 1932 proclaimed 
the appearance of “a single new style … which exists throughout the world” 
characterized by three principles. Please state them and cite a building that 
exemplifies this “International Style.” The museum’s assertion does not account for 
other approaches to modernism in architecture from the 1920s to the 1950s. Cite an
example of such an alternative approach and compare it to your example of the 
International Style.
- Architecture as volume not mass - Look at Cannonical Modernism lecture 4. Compare the following houses with respect to (1) the organization of their 
respective interiors, (2) the use of materials (both primary structural materials and 
visible materials),and (3) the relationship of the house to landscape (siting, 
relationship of indoor to outdoor spaces): Tugendhat House (Mies van der Rohe), 
Villa Savoye (Le Corbusier), Fallingwaer (Wright), Villa Mairea (Aalto).
- Look at Modernist Villa Lecture - Fallingwater used different ceiling heights for different uses in each room o Took rock from the surroundings
o Also incorporates concrete (colored) into the natural quality of the 
house
background image - Tugendhat House - Villa Savoye o Garden on top - Villa Mairea o Had a steamhouse in the back
o Nordic
5. We have examined a number of public housing projects in Europe and the United 
States intended for working-class families and others unable to afford market rates. 
Please select three of the following examples and discuss some of the objectives 
their architects addressed: Eigen Haard development, Amsterdam, Michel de Klerk, 
1917; Hoek van Holland development, J. J. P. Oud, 1924; Karl Marx Hof, Vienna, Karl 
Ehn, 1927; Narkomfin housing, Moscow, Moisei Ginzburg and Ignaty Milinis, 1928; 
Langston Terrace, Washington, D. C., Hilyard Robinson and Paul R. Williams, 1935; 
Unité d’habitation, Marseille, Le Corbusier, 1947.
- Unite d’habitation - Housing lecture - Marseille, D.C., Moscow 6. The École de Beaux-Arts in Paris and the Bauhaus in Germany had international 
influence. Describe and compare how architecture students were taught at these 
schools. What underlying assumptions about architecture and architectural training 
do they represent?  
- Beaux-Arts o Classical training; students would take classes and participate in  design contests - Bauhaus  o More of a technical school; trained in using new materials - Find a building example for each (anything before 1900s for Beaux-Arts) 7. Compare 20th-century approaches to expression of religious architecture in the 
mosque of the Turkish Grand National Assembly, Park Synagogue by Eric 
Mendelsohn, and Notre-Dame du Haut by Le Corbusier. At each religious building, 
how did the architect negotiate tradition and modernity?
- Turkish o Connected to the Turkish legislature since most members were Muslim  but wanted to make it look like a secular gov’t o Mosques have more structural requirements - Synagogue o Dome screams synagogue - Catholic o Need a room, occupy a space
o Could make wild religious forms
8. Discuss how the advent of automobiles transformed the ways people thought 
about buildings, cities, and landscapes in the 20th century. Support your points with
examples.
background image - Consider parking - South American mall - Wright parking visitation place - Suburbs could radiate outwards - Metropolises - Automobile lecture 9. In the excerpts you read of Le Corbusier’s Towards a New Architecture and Robert
Venturi’s Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture, the two authors challenge 
prevailing conventions of their respective times for losing sight of important 
architectural values and call on architects to adopt new attitudes. What problems 
does each identify? Are they the same? What about their proposed solutions? 
Consider similarities of approach as well as differences.
- Le Corbusier o Criticized the decorativeness and eclecticism of current architecture
o Argued for architecture that was functional and practical; architecture 
should operate like a machine - Venturi o Criticized modern architects for being exclusive and not  accommodating Stuck to simple and redundant forms o Wanted architects to embrace the complexity possible within  architecture - Look at these essays in the reader o Or, you know, google summaries 10. In what ways did Mexican and Brazilian architects address broad themes of 
modernism and modernity (such as political ideologies, aesthetics, technology, and 
global economy) during the 20th century? 
- Look at the Brazil and Mexico ppt (Week 13) 11. Please discuss the issue of national identity and architecture with respect to two
of the following: (1) post-colonial nations on the Indian subcontinent or (2) post-
colonial nations in sub-Saharan Africa, (3) post-imperial China, or (4) the 
reconstruction of Japan following World War II.
- Depending on which of these you want to do, there are ppt/lectures on each Slide ID List - Brussels: Tassel House (interior staircase), Victor Horta, 1893 - Buffalo, NY: Guaranty Trust Building, Adler & Sullivan, 1894 - Vienna: “Majolica House,” Otto Wagner, 1898
background image - Vienna: Secession Building, Joseph Olbrich, 1898 - Brussels: Stoclet Palace, Josef Hoffman, 1905 - Barcelona: Casa Mila, Antoni Gaudi, 1905 - Berlin: AEG Turbine Factory, Peter Behrens, 1909 - Vienna: Looshaus, Adolf Loos, 1911 - Cologne (Germany): Glass Pavilion, Bruno Taut, 1914 - Antonia Sant’Elia, studies for La Citta Nuova (the New City), 1914 - Amsterdam: Eigen Haard Housing Estate, Michel de Klerk, 1917 - Nanjing (China): Gingline College for Girls (Nanjing Normal University), Henry 
Murphy, 1918
- Project for the Monument to the Third International, Vladimir Tatlin, 1919 - Potsdam (Germany): Einstein Tower, Erich Mendelsohn, 1920 - Stockholm: Public Library, Gunnar Asplund, 1920 - Rotterdam (Hook of Holland): Workers’ housing, J.J.P. Oud, 1924 - Utrecth (Netherlands): Schroder House, Gerrit Rietveld, 1924 - Dessau (Germany): Bauhaus, Walter Gropius, 1925 - Moscow: Rusakov Workers’ Club, Konstantin Melnikov, 1927 - Moscow: project for the Lenin Institute, Ivan Leonidov, 1927 - Vienna: Karl Marx Hof, Karl Ehn, 1927 - Moscow: Narkomfin apartment building, Moisei Ginzburg and Ignaty Milinis, 
1928
- New York, Chrysler Building, William Van Alen, 1928 - Zilna (Slovakia): New Synagogue, Peter Behrens, 1928 - Poissy (France): Villa Savoye, Le Corbusier, 1929 - Guanzhou (China): Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hall, Lu Yanzhi, 1929 - Mexico City: Rivera/Kahlo house and studios, Juan O’Gorman, 1929 - Brno (Czech Republic): Tugendhat House, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, 1930 - Como (Italy): Casa del Fascio, Giuseppe Terragni, 1932 - Mill Run (PA): Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright, 1935 - Washington, D.C.: Langston Terrace, Hilyard Robinson and Paul R. Williams, 
1935
- Frankfurt (Germany): Frankfurt Kitchen, Margarate Schutte-Lihotzky, 1936 - Rio de Janeiro: Ministry of Education and Health Building, Lucio Costa, Oscar 
Niemeyer and others with Le Corbusier, 1936
- Noormarku (Finland): Villa Mairea, Alvar Alto, 1937 - Belo Horizonte (Brazil): St. Francis of Assisi church, Oscar Niemeyer, 1943 - New Gourna (Egypt): village, Hassan Fathy, 1945 - Marseille (France): Unite d’Habitation, Le Corbusier, 1947 - Wichita, Kansas: Dymaxion House, R. Buckminster Fuller, 1948 - Tropical House (Maison Tropicale), Jean Prouve, 1949 - Ronchamp (France): Notre-Dame du Haut, Le Corbusier, 1950 - Ibadan (Nigeria): Kuti Hall, University of Ibadan, Jane Drew and Maxwell Fry, 
1950
- Cleveland Heights, OH: Park Synagogue, Eric Mendelsohn, 1950 (?) - Chandigarh (India): master plan, Le Corbusier, 1951 - Chandigarh (India): Assembly building, 1951 - Mexico City: UNAM library, Juan O’Gorman, 1953 - Brasilia: master plan, Lucio Costa, 1956 - Brasilia: National Congress building, Oscar Niemeyer, 1960 - Chestnut Hill, PA: Vanna Venturi House, Robert Venturi, 1962

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School: University of Texas at Austin
Department: Architecture
Course: World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present
Professor: Richard Cleary
Term: Summer 2015
Tags: World History, Architecture of Continents, and Architecture
Name: World Architecture: Industrial Revolution to Present Final Exam Study Guid
Description: This study guide gives basic outlines for each essay question and also contains flash cards of the slide IDs.
Uploaded: 12/03/2016
20 Pages 162 Views 129 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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