Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

CSU - ANEQ 305 - Class Notes - Week 14

Created by: Andrew Everitt Elite Notetaker

> > > > CSU - ANEQ 305 - Class Notes - Week 14

CSU - ANEQ 305 - Class Notes - Week 14

School: Colorado State University
Department: Science
Course: Functional Large Animal Anatomy/Physiology
Professor: Hyungchul Han
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Physiology
Name: ANEQ305 Week 14 notes
Description: These notes finish the digestive system and begin the reproductive system.
Uploaded: 12/04/2016
This preview shows pages 1 - 3 of a 9 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image ANEQ305  Week 14  11-28-16  Most absorption takes place in the duodenum and jejunem  -         Absorption of Carbohydrates  Disaccharides are hydrolyzed into absorbable monosaccharides by  enzymes in the brush border  Glucose and galactose are absorbed by secondary active transport  with Na+ as a cotransporter  -         Absorption of Proteins  Amino acids are absorbed by secondary active transport similar to  glucose transport  -          Absorption of Fat  o Once micelles reach the epithelial cells, monoglycerides and free fatty  acids diffuse across the luminal membrane  o Reassembled into triglycerides inside epithelial cells 
o Chylomicrons, containing triglycerides, are extruded by exocytosis into 
the interstitial fluid and picked up by lacteals  Glucose + glucose = maltose  Glucose + galactose = lactose  Glucose + Fructose = sucrose    -          Absorption of Vitamins  o Water – soluble vitamins are absorbed passively 
o Fat-soluble vitamins are absorbed along with fat 
o Vitamin B12 must be combined with gastric intrinsic factor (secreted 
by the stomach) for absorption in the ileum  -          7000 mL of secreted digestive juices must be absorbed daily  -          Diarrhea is passage of a highly fluid fecal matter usually due to excessive  intestinal motility  o Loss of fluids results in dehydration, loss of nutrients and metabolic  acidosis  Vertebrate Hindgut  -         Consists of the colon, cecum, and rectum or cloaca  - Vermiform appendix in humans and some apes stores lymphocytes and has 
no digestive function 
-         The colon is made up of 3 regions: Ascending, transverse and descending  colon  Carnivores have short simple colons 
Omnivores and herbivores have longer colons with expandable side 
sacs called haustra  - In amphibians, reptiles, birds and some mammals the hindgut terminates in a
cloaca, shared by the renal and reproductive systems 
The Primary Function of the Colon is Storage of Fecal Material 
background image - The colon of a human receives 500 mL of indigestible chyme from the small 
intestine each day 
- Absorbs water and salt  - Symbiotic micro-organisms synthesize vitamins  - Undigestive cellulose adds to the bulk  Motility  - Peristaltic contractions propel the contents toward the rectum, while anti-
peristaltic contractions fill the cecum 
-         Haustral contractions impede the flow of materials  - Bacteria accumulate in the large intestine because of the slow colonic 
movement 
- After meals, mass movement quickly drive colonic contents into the distal 
portion of the large intestine where material is stored until defecation 
Ruminants have achieved the highest degree of specialization in 
fermenting plant material 
- The ruminant stomach is highly populated with anaerobic microbes able to 
break down cellulose into end products of fermentation 
-         The stomach of true ruminants (cattle, sheep, goats, deer, giraffe and  antelope) is divided into 4 compartments  - Pseudoruminants (llamas and camels) have a 3-compartment stomach  The forestomach is involved in storage and passage of ingested food  -         Rumen              o  Anaerobic fermentation of plant material 
o  Absorption of nutrients and simple molecules 
o  Divided into internal compartments by pillars 
o  Finger-like papillae increase the surface area 
-         Reticulum – same function as the rumen  -         Omasum  o  Provides a channel for passage of ingesta from the reticulum into the  abomasum  o  Absorbs water and nutrients  -         The Abomasum resembles the stomach of monogastric vertebrates  o  Acid-secreting region of the stomach 
o  Digests proteins and lyses rumen microbes 
The Horse Cecum  - The cecum is found in most animals but is not well developed like it is in the 
horse 
- The cecum in the horse provides a suitable environment for microbes to 
produce volatile fatty acids (VFA) as end-products of fermentation. The VFAs 
are absorbed thru the gut wall of the large intestine and become a major 
source of energy for the horse 
- Microbial protein cannot be utilized to any great extent by the horse. This 
means that animals with a high demand for protein (foals, lactating mares 
and exercising horses) must therefore be fed high-quality protein 
background image - Bacterial proteins synthesized in the rumen are digested in the small 
intestine and constitute the major source of amino acids for the cow. But, this
doesn’t work for the horse because the cecum is caudal to the small intestine
Rumination Cycle (cud-chewing)  - Regurgitation  Contraction of the reticulum propels semi-liquid digesta into the  esophagus  Digesta moves up the esophagus and into the mouth by reverse  peristalsis  - Remastication – prolonged chewing  - Redeglutination – food is reswallowed  Fermentation is the most important process to occur in the rumen  - Bacteria use cellulase to digest structurally complex polysaccharides  -         Microbial fermentation of glucose, xylose and fat produces volatile fatty acids  (VFAs)  VFAs (acetate, propionate and butyrate) are important because they  can be directly used as a source of energy  VFAs are passively absorbed through the rumen wall  - Bacterial proteases digest proteins   At least 20 possible signal peptides have been isolated from the 
mammalian digestive tract 
- Gastrin – stimulates secretion of gastric juices and enhances motility in 
several areas 
- Secretin – acts by several mechanisms to reduce acidity in the duodenum  -         Cholecystokinin (CCK) – inhibits gastric motility and secretion, stimulates  secretion of pancreatic enzymes and release of bile, and signals satiety  -         GIP – glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide) – stimulates insulin release  -         Motilin – stimulates motility in the stomach and small intestine  -         Ghrelin – stimulates growth hormone release and increases appetite  -         Obestatin – decreases appetite  -         PYY- inhibits gastric motility, stimulates bile and pancreas secretion, and  suppresses appetite  -         Nefstatin-1 – suppresses appetite  Chapter 16 – Reproductive Systems   Reproductive systems are essential for perpetuation of the species  - Not aimed toward homeostasis  - Not necessary for survival of the individual  Animals may reproduce asexually or sexually  - All prokaryotes reproduce by a cloning process in which one ccell divides and 
gives rise to 2 identical cells 
- Eukaryotes reproduce sexually 

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
9 Pages 59 Views 47 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Colorado State University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Colorado State University
Department: Science
Course: Functional Large Animal Anatomy/Physiology
Professor: Hyungchul Han
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Physiology
Name: ANEQ305 Week 14 notes
Description: These notes finish the digestive system and begin the reproductive system.
Uploaded: 12/04/2016
9 Pages 59 Views 47 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Recommended Documents
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to CSU - ANEQ 305 - Class Notes - Week 14
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to CSU - ANEQ 305 - Class Notes - Week 14

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here