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UND - PSYC 405 - Exam 4 (FINAL) Study Guide - Study Guide

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UND - PSYC 405 - Exam 4 (FINAL) Study Guide - Study Guide

School: University of North Dakota
Department: Psychology
Course: History and Systems of Psychology
Professor: Alison Kelly
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Exam 4 (FINAL) Study Guide
Description: FINAL (Exam 4) Study Guide ALL class lecture notes for this exam (Week 14-16) Suggested problems and solutions for short answer (ch. 13 - 15)
Uploaded: 12/09/2016
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background image Week 14  
Monday 11.21.16 
 
Psychoanalysis: The Beginnings (Chapter 13) 
The Development of Psychoanalysis 
  Not a formal school of thought 
  No protest movement 
  Began in 1895; overlapped with other schools of thought 
  Opposition to the prevailing disorder treatment trends 
Antecedents to Psychoanalysis    Philosophical speculations about unconscious phenomena  Leibnitz’s Monadology: Mental events had differing degrees of consciousness  Gustav Fechner: Suggested that the mind is analogous to an iceberg    Early idea about psychopathology  Babylonians: Caused by demonic possession; treated by magic and prayer  Christianity: Blamed evil spirits; treated with torture and execution  18 th  century: Viewed as irrational behavior; confined to lunatic asylums with no treatment    More humane treatments eventually arose  Dr. Philippe Pinel: Mentally ill deserve consideration; treated by methods of natural science  Dorothea Dix: Petitioned legislators to mandate human treatment  Dr. Benjamin Rush: Somatic approach     Drained blood, dunked in icy water, spun at high speeds  The Emmanuel Movement: Talk therapy with religious leaders (psychic approach)  Charcot and Janet: Hypnosis to treat hysterical patients (psychic approach)  Franz Mesmer: “Animal magnetism as a therapeutic technique    Restored balance between magnetic levels in patient and environment  Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)    Born in Czech Republic to a Jewish family (anti-Semitism) 
  MD from University of Vienna 
  Experimented with cocaine; gave to friends and colleagues; initially denied addictiveness 
  Life and work faced upheaval with Hitler’s rise 
Books publicly burned by Nazis in 1933; home invasion and theft    Exiled in London stricken with jaw cancer 
  Died from physician-assisted suicide  
  The Case of “Anna O.” 
Patient of Dr. Joseph Breuer    Psychological causes of physical symptoms 
  Relived traumatic events that had left conscious memory 
First case study in psychoanalysis  Introduced Freud to the “talking cure”    The Sexual Basis of Neurosis  Discovered using free association    Saying whatever comes to mind with embarrassment 
background image   Patients’ memories reached back to childhood 
  Many repressed experiences concerned sexual issues 
  The Childhood Seduction Theory  Childhood seductions with older family members were the root of problems  Later suggested that patient’ childhood seduction experiences were not real    Freud’s sex life  Experienced sexual difficulties; negative attitude toward sex  Became celibate at age 41  Sexual frustrations led to neurotic episode    Anxiety and neurasthenia    Dream analysis   Interpretation of dreams to uncover unconscious conflict  Conducted most of the work on himself  Published “The Interpretation of Dreams” in 1900   
Wednesday 11.23.16 & Friday 11.25.16 – No lecture Notes 
 
 
Week 15  Monday 11.28.16 – No Lecture Notes 
 
Wednesday 11.30.16  
 
Psychoanalysis as a Method of Treatment (Freud) 
  Patients experienced resistance and repression during free association 
  Role was to help confront repressed material 
  Dream analysis: symbolically expressed forbidden desires 
Children – genital organs  Playing with children – masturbation  Elongated objects – male genitalia  Enclosed spaces – female genitalia  Riding horses, climbing stairs, crossing bridges – intercourse    Used therapy to collect data for case studies rather than to help patients 
  No experimental research methods, controlled experiments, or statistics 
  Believed his own abilities should guide theory construction; ignored criticism 
  Psychoanalysis vs. Psychology    Poorly received by academic psychology  Vociferous critics (Ladd-Franklin, Watson, Cattell)  20-year article publication prohibition    1920s  Some ideas appeared in textbooks    1930s & 1940s 
background image Irresistible to the general public  Academic irritated by confusion of psychoanalysis with psychology  Applied Freudian ideas to experimental testing  Inferior to a psychology based on experimentation    1950s & 1960s  Some Freudian ideas became mainstream    The unconscious, importance of childhood experiences, defense mechanism    The Scientific Validation of Psychoanalytic Concepts    Freud’s ideas subjected to experimental tests to examine credibility  Some studies found support for:    Oedipus complex and castration anxiety 
  Dreams reflecting emotional concerns 
  Some defense mechanisms 
  Freudian slips (reflect anxieties and unconscious conflicts) 
No support found for:    The symbolism for dreams 
  Male identification with fathers to resolve Oedipus complex 
  Personality formation by age five 
  Women having poorly developed superegos 
  Criticisms of Psychoanalysis    Data Collection Methods  No systematic, controlled observations  No word-for-word transcription of sessions    Lost, distorted, or omitted data?  Produced data consistent with his ideas    Discrepancies between session notes and published case histories 
  No steps taken to verify patients’ claims 
  May have used coercive procedures to elicit childhood seduction stories 
  Reliance on small, unrepresentative samples; self-analysis 
  Assumptions about women (“Penis envy”) 
  Contributions of Psychoanalysis    Significant impact on American popular culture and consciousness  Video played in class [Freud! The Musial (friends) – referencing penis envy]    Influenced the 20 th  century sexual liberation movement    Most frequently cited individual in psychology research literature 
  Psychology’s truly great proponent of Darwin-like stature – E.G. Boring (1929) 
 
Friday 12.2.16 - No Lecture Notes 
 
 

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School: University of North Dakota
Department: Psychology
Course: History and Systems of Psychology
Professor: Alison Kelly
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Exam 4 (FINAL) Study Guide
Description: FINAL (Exam 4) Study Guide ALL class lecture notes for this exam (Week 14-16) Suggested problems and solutions for short answer (ch. 13 - 15)
Uploaded: 12/09/2016
10 Pages 53 Views 42 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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