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USM - AT 131 - Religion 131 Final Study Guide - Study Guide

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USM - AT 131 - Religion 131 Final Study Guide - Study Guide

School: University of Southern Mississippi
Department: Athletic Training
Course: Comparative Religion
Professor: Amy Slagle
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Religion 131 Final Study Guide
Description: Everything you need for the final
Uploaded: 12/10/2016
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background image Vocabulary: Kashrut (kosher)­ “clean” Jewish dietary laws Tanak­ old testament  Mitzvah/Mitzvot­ commandment/commandments Tefillin­ leather boxes worn around arm and on foreheads during prayer Tallit­ prayer shawl  Shofar­ Ram’s horn blown on Rosh Hashanah  Shema­ “First word of this prayer”; Hear, O Israel, the Lord is our God, the Lord alone. (Deut. 6:4) Ahimsa­ Non­violence; is the belief that all things are interconnected Samadhi­ (goal) state of complete inner peace resulting from meditation Sadhu­ wandering holy people; Hindu ascetic; renunciant  Japam­ Chanting the name of a god or goddess Vedas­ mean “sacred knowledge,” and is an ancient library full of magical texts and hymns. This library is  believed to hold the cosmic sounds of the universe; it is a Hierophany. Prana/pranayama­ breath of “life force”/practice of breathing control undertaken to still the mind Upanishads­ means “near­sitting,” because the students who sat nearest to the Gurus, spiritual teachers,  learned the most. They are the last books of the Vedic library and chart out the nature of reality and what to  do about it. They are thought to originally be the teachings of Gurus. Avatar­ hierophany; manifestation of a deity; a god taking physical form Guru­ spiritual teacher Mantra­ words or phrases chanted out of devotion or to change one’s state of mind Avalokiteshvara­ “hearer of the cries of the world”; India/Tibet a celestial Bodhisattva Sangha­ community of monks and nuns; monasticism Shakyamuni­ sage of the Shakya tribe; another title for the Siddhartha Gautama whose father was of the  Shakya tribe
background image Bhikku/Bhikkuni­ ordained male/female member of Buddhist monastic community Mandala­ circular pattern used as an aid in Buddhist and Hindu meditation Skandhas­ “A heap”; the aggregates  Dharma­ means “Law” or “Duty”; It is the deeds a being needs to preform pertaining to what they have  been born as; or the teachings of the Buddha Dalai Lama­ “Great Ocean Teacher”; leader of the Tibetan Buddhists; he is the reincarnation of  Avalokiteshvara Bodhisattva­ “Buddha­to­be”; a figure/person who is on the verge of attaining nirvana, yet foregoes it to  compassionately help others attain this goal  Parinirvana­  complete extinction; no longer reborn Fitra­ “good constitution”; original framework or natures of humans as created by God; humans are innately good but are also granted free will Ihram­ two­piece white garment worn during the Hajj to symbolize equality OR state of ritual sanctity  during the hajj Ka’aba­ “cube”, granite structure encased I kiswah, black shroud covering the structure new one is made  every year; site of ancient meteorite; housed 360 idols in pre­Islamic Arabia which Muhammad clears them  out in 630; believed to be the sight of the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve built the first one but it was  destroyed in the flood; Abraham and Ishmael rebuilt it as a shrine to Allah; in Mecca Umma­ word wide community of Muslims Hijra­ In 622 Muhammad and his followers fled Mecca to the city of Yathrib, which will eventually be  renamed Medina al Nabi which means “The City of the Prophet” Sura­ chapter of the Qur’an; there are 114 Caliph­ “successor” religious and political leader of the world­wide community of Muslims; last one was in  1924 Shirk­ (idolatry) association of something with god that is not god; set attention on “false ultimate’s” and  away from the ultimate which is Allah
background image General Religion Concepts:
background image Religion­ comes from the Latin word “religare” which means to tie or bind together  Homo religiosus­ a term used to say that humans have always made a distinction between 2 fundamental  states: profane and sacred; humans are innately religious or seeking a higher power Emic­ looking from the “inside”; the point of view of a practitioner or someone who is a part of the specific  religion or other cultural aspect; these people are usually concerned with the “truth”; I like to remember this  by thinking of the word immersed which sounds a little like emic and if you are part of the religion you are  immersed in it Etic­ looking from the “outside”; the point of view of someone who is not deeply involved in the religion or  other cultural aspect; viewing cross­cultural application; these people are concerned with understanding the  “others” and learning; remember etic has a ‘t’ in it like the word outside Profane­ the human sphere, secular life; the part of the fundamental world where someone is searching for  meaning; examples: just regular human people and the world we live in Sacred­ beyond the human sphere. This is the higher power, creator, supernatural realm; this is the part of  the fundamental world that provides meaning to someone; examples: Gods, goddesses, creators, higher  powers, things like that Hierophany­ the appearance between the sacred in the profane; when the sacred and profane meet;  examples: The Qur’an Myth­ technical term for stories about the sacred; not about being true or false; examples: the revelation on  Mt. Hira, when Gabriel appeared to Muhammad Ritual­ performative action designed to open communication with the sacred; rights of passages or the  transitions in a person’s life; examples: salat or prayer 5 times a day Symbol­ visual representation for religion; examples: crescent moon, ka’aba Doctrine­ official, institutionally approved interpretation(s) of hierophanies; boundaries setting groups  apart; this can control the interpretation of an Hierophany; example: The Shahada Atheism­ denial of the existence of the sacred  Agnosticism­ knowledge that the existence of the sacred is impossible to prove

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School: University of Southern Mississippi
Department: Athletic Training
Course: Comparative Religion
Professor: Amy Slagle
Term: Fall 2016
Tags:
Name: Religion 131 Final Study Guide
Description: Everything you need for the final
Uploaded: 12/10/2016
13 Pages 77 Views 61 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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