Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Final

Created by: Mikayla Notetaker Elite Notetaker

> > > > MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Final

MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Final

School: Miami University
Department: Geography
Course: Geographic Environments
Professor: Kimberly Medley
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: plate, tectonics, Rock, Formation, Slopes, landforms, endogenic, exogenic, orders, Of, and relief
Name: Final Exam Study Guide
Description: These notes cover what will be on our final exam.
Uploaded: 12/10/2016
0 5 3 45 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 4 of a 18 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Orders of Relief Review Questions 1. How does continental crust differ from oceanic crust and what is the asthenosphere? Continental crust differs from oceanic crust in all of the following ways: 1. its thicker 2. less dense 3. more buoyant 4. richer in light elements like Na, K, and Si, and poorer in dense elements 
like Fe and Mg relative to oceanic crust
Because continental crust is less dense than oceanic crust it floats higher on the 
mantle, just like a piece of Styrofoam floats higher on water than a piece of wood 
does. Oceanic crust and continental crust have different 
densities because they are made of different kinds of rock with different  densities.  The asthenosphere is the weak and easily deformed layer of the Earth that acts as 
a “lubricant” for the tectonic plates to slide over; thick, plastic layer within 
Earth’s upper mantle that flows in response to convection, instigating plate 
tectonic motion
The crust is a chemically distinct layer at the surface of the Earth. Crustal material
contains lighter elements like Si, O, Al, Ca, K, Na, etc... Feldspars (Anorthite, 
Albite, Orthoclase) are common minerals in the crust (CaAL2Si2O8,  
NaALSi3O8 , KALSi3O8). The crust may be divided into 2 types: oceanic and 
continental. Oceanic crust is usually 5­10 km thick and continental crust is 33 km 
thick on average.
2. Explain the patterns identified as continental drift by Wegner and the process of  sea­floor spreading put forward much later by Holmes and Hess that together verify the
theory of plate tectonics.
Continental drift:  1. continents fit as a jigsaw puzzle 2. similar fossils across continents 1. mesosaurus: a freshwater reptile
background image 3. coal deposits of tropical plants 4. Wegner’s theory of continental drift 1. continental plates moved over time sea­floor spreading: separation of oceanic plates to form Mid­Atlantic ridge 1. Atlantic is getting bigger 2. Pacific smaller 3. Homes 1940’s 4. Hess 1960’s Theory of plate tectonics: lithosphere composed of different plates that move 
independently of one another at varying speeds over the earth’s surface
3. Outline some major events that occurred from the break­up of Pangaea to the  formation and location of the present­day continents and how they are seen today on 
the landscape. Is North America more temperate or tropical today? 
1. 280­225 MY (million years)­break up of Pangaea 2. 180­100 MY­ break up of Gondwanaland 3. About 50 MY BP­­India collides into Asia 4. 17 MY Africa pushes against Europe­­a compressional force contributing  to rise of the Alps 5. 20 MY to 2 MY­­subduction of the Pacific plate with expansion of  Atlantic 6. 5.7 MY North America joins South America  During the Cretaceous Period, much of the United States experienced warmer 
climates than now, ferns and conifer forests were common
4. How did the Appalachians, Andes, Himalayas, Alps, Mt. Fuji, and the Cascades  form and which are older and which are younger?
background image Appalachians formed in 280­225 MY (point 1) with the breakup of Pangaea with 
the compressed force between the 2 continents as they moved apart
Himalayas formed about 50 MY BP (point 3): created a compressional force Cascades: The range first began forming millions of years ago through movement 
of the earth’s plate and volcanic action with erosion also playing a part. It was 
around 36 million years ago that the first peaks began to rise above the ground. It 
was in the Pleistocene Period around 1.6 million yeas ago that the major peaks of 
today began to form. During volcanic activity around 5 million years ago more 
than 3,000 vents erupted. However, not all the peaks in the Cascade are of 
volcanic origin. The region known as the North Cascades has many mountains 
that are not of volcanic origin, where as the region known as the High Cascades 
has the most volcanoes and is largely of volcanic origin.
Alps formed at 17 MY (point 4): Africa pushes against Europe and creates a 
compressional force
The Andes were formed by tectonic activity whereby earth is uplifted as one plate
(oceanic crust) subducts under another plate (continental crust). To get such a 
high mountain chain in a subduction zone setting is unusual which adds to the 
importance of trying to figure out when and how it happened. However, the 
timing of when the Andean mountain chain uplift occurred has been a topic of 
some controversy over the past ten years. The prevailing view is that the Andes 
became a mountain range between 10­6 million years ago when a huge volume of 
rock dropped off the base of the Earth's crust in response to over­thickening of the
crust in this region. When this large portion of dense material was removed, the 
remaining portion of the crust underwent rapid uplift.
  The West Coast of South  America is a convergent boundary between the Nazca Plate and the South 
American Plate. The collision of this oceanic and continental plate was how the 
Andes Mountains were formed  Around 10,000 years ago (or 17,000 years ago according to another estimation) a 
large volume of lava erupted from the mountain top, which almost covered Ko­
Fuji Volcano to create Shin­Fuji (New Fuji) Volcano. This activity mostly formed
the current Mount Fuji (It is assumed to be 6,000 ­ 3,500 years ago). 5. Define and provide geographical examples of landforms associated with sea­floor  spreading, continental plate divergence, hot spots, convergence and subduction, passive continental boundaries, and the absence of continental plate interaction.  Sea­floor spreading: see above definition; ex. Today, Europe and North America 
move about 3 inches (7.5 centimeters) farther apart every year as the Atlantic 
Ocean grows wider. 
background image Subduction: oceanic plates (basalt, heavier) goes beneath continental plate 
(granite, lighter), forms trench on oceanic side and volcanoes and mountains on 
other side; ex. The Andes Mountains of South America and the Cascade 
Mountains of North America are examples of volcanic arcs
Convergence: where two plates are moving towards each other and colliding. The 
pressure and friction is great enough at these boundaries that the material in the 
Earth's mantle can melt, and both earthquakes and volcanoes happen nearby; ex.   produced the Himalayas when the Indian­Australian plate collided with the  Eurasian plate.  Passive plate boundary: broad continental shelves of relatively shallow water, 
topographically flat continental boundary; ex.  The Amazon River, whose source 
is in the Andes Mountains (the active margin) drains east across the interior of 
South America to the coast, where it enters the Atlantic Ocean and deposits the 
tremendous volume of sedimentary materials it eroded from the continent.
No plate interaction: very old rock, low topographic relief; ex. ? Hot spot:  A hot spot is fed by a region deep within the Earth’s mantle from which  heat rises through the process of convection. This heat facilitates the melting of 
rock at the base of the lithosphere, where the brittle, upper portion of the mantle 
meets the Earth’s crust. The melted rock, known as magma, often pushes through 
cracks in the crust to form volcanoes. Ex. Basaltic Plateau­­Colombian Plateau
   Divergence: Divergence: Separation of two plates as they move in opposing 
directions;
  when oceanic plates diverge, a ridge (mountain chain) develops and  seafloor spreading occurs. Molten rock pushes up at the divergent margin, 
creating mountains and an expanding seafloor; ex. Rifting between the Arabian 
and African plates formed the Red Sea in this way.  6. Are there mountains that you would predict are still forming as a result of ongoing  plate movements? Anywhere that there is still tectonic subduction going on, there is active mountain 
building.  For instance, the plate boundary between India and Asia is active an the
Himalayas are still growing.  This is demonstrated by the deep seated earth 
quakes in the mantle beneath the mountains and the fact the Mt. Everest is 
increasing in height.
The Andes along the length of S. America are actively growing. The recent 
volcanic activity in S. Chile is evidence of that.

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Miami University who use StudySoup to get ahead
18 Pages 67 Views 53 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at Miami University who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: Miami University
Department: Geography
Course: Geographic Environments
Professor: Kimberly Medley
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: plate, tectonics, Rock, Formation, Slopes, landforms, endogenic, exogenic, orders, Of, and relief
Name: Final Exam Study Guide
Description: These notes cover what will be on our final exam.
Uploaded: 12/10/2016
18 Pages 67 Views 53 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Final
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to MU - GEO 122 - Study Guide - Final

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here