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UMD - MUSC 0106 - Final Exam Study Guide - Study Guide

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UMD - MUSC 0106 - Final Exam Study Guide - Study Guide

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background image Global Metal Countries Spread Uniqueness Similar aspects Brazil After a dictatorship in  1985, many heavy 
metal bands had 
albums come out Represented  freedom of speech 
for the oppressed 
Brazilians Indonesia...oppression during dictatorship Japan 1972, Deep Purple  brought more 
improvisation to 
Japan and became a 
legend.
KISS’ makeup looked
like the were from 
kabuki theatres. From Japanese  metal came visual 
kei.
Iran...release from  their courteous selves 
outside the concert
India Resisting Bollywood  music, the most 
popular music of 
India.  Spread 
through sound 
recordings and 
touring bands.
All about being  strong, not 
conforming to 
society, emphasizing
individuality
China...being strong,  not conforming, 
individuality
China A band called Tang 
Dynasty was the first 
Chinese metal band. Long hair = martial 
strength, like the 
ancient warriors India...being strong 
Iran...gives young 
people a chance to 
express their dark 
feelings stemming 
from political 
inadequacy, injustice, 
and a corrupt 
government Indonesia When Metallica came to play, even people 
from the mainland 
visited Indonesia to 
see them in concert.  
But outside, the 
neighborhood was 
actually on fire and 
international metal 
shows were banned. Bands sing about  social and political 
issues
Brazil...dictatorship,  oppression is in the 
country
background image Israel Used the Internet to 
access heavy metal 
recordings It is a way for the 
young people to 
learn about the cycle
of persecuting Jews,
Christians, and 
Muslims
...major political issues
including religion and 
violence Iran (via Dubai) Spread through the 
Internet
Metal gear is 
restricted, no jeans 
are allowed, no long­
hair, everyone must 
be seated at 
concerts.
Metal community is 
considered anti­
moralistic and “not 
good.”
Western music is 
restricted, shows are
cancelled, it is an 
isolated community
China, India..relief 
from anger in a 
positive way Merengue Music nationalism ­  the use of music specifically to assert the all­important sense of united  community within a nation­state, and also to assert some sense of difference to citizens of other
nation­states
Merengue ­  contradance from Europe, line dancing, with 2 rows of people.  With many regional  variations. Diaspora ­  any group that has been dispersed, often forcibly, outside its traditional homeland Transnationalism ­  a community characterized by a constant flow of people in both directions, a  dual sense of identity, ambivalent attachments to two nations, and a network of kinship and 
friendship ties across state frontiers.
Rafael Trujillo Dictator of the Dominican Republic, from 1930­1961 Characterized by totalitarian (control owned most lands, businesses, radio  stations) Really known for Hispanicist ideologies and anti­Haitian sentiments (1937  Massacre, near the shared border) Violence against opposition Merengue as DR’s national music Control and power ­­ Trujillo’s influence
background image Personal preference, he chose this as the national music from  1916 US military occupation He himself came from a lower class, but is said to hate the elite Trujillo loved merengue After his death Freedom in songs, lyrics, circulation Musicians are now able to tour abroad More changes in style each decade (60s’ and  onward) Crossing lines ­­ appealing to various classes, regions, races Oppression ­­ showing support to Trujillo through listening, dancing, playing to  show favor to the dictator, a good way to protect oneself “Contradictions” in Dominican culture Northern region was mainly people with lighter skin, Southern  region was typically people with darker skin, when the people conceptualize 
themselves as “one race”
Representative of the “big heritages” drum = African, “metal  scraper” = native, button accordion = European “Que viva el jefe”
Johnny Ventura y su combo
Made merengue bands look like a smaller ensemble Influenced by Elvis Presley’s performance style Made the national music seem more modern Appealed to younger audiences Performing in TV shows upped awareness and national notice of merengue Fefita, “La Grande” First popular female accordionist (of the DR) when no other women were doing it Women in merengue were typically only in vocals, but she herself  was both lead singer and musician Tipico moderno Used button accordion, and Cibal region instruments, and added a little more instruments (not wind like questra) Low­middle to lower class DR community in NYC Transnational community Connections to the homeland (Christmas, summer vacation,  politics, friends and family, send money back to help family) Fluid identities (I am Dominican, but I am an American  Citizen...dual citizenship) Differentiated them from other Latinos (especially salsa) Unifier in the face of discrimination Source of national pride Maintained cultural heritage Merengue vs. Salsa
background image Salsa as pan­Latino in the 60s­70s Salsa was developed by Dominicans in NYC, based on merengue Merengue was more popular than salsa (in the non­Dominican communities) in  1980s Easier to dance to (8­step salsa vs. 2­step merengue) Still a symbol of Dominican­ness Merengue fusions Second generation (YA 1990s) Connecting to their roots Combining surroundings and heritage Meren­rap/Merengue hip­hop(and EDM)/Merenhouse Influential bands, also popular in the DR Proyecto Uno Fulanito Created this new subgenre for the youths Dual Identity Combination of instruments and sounds from both genres Combination of Spanish and English Talking about their connection to their heritage and homeland Talking about their experiences as Dominican Americans in NYC Imagery of both places Fulanito, “Guayando” Fela Kuti Politics ­  the negotiation of power relations Protest Music ­  Used for:  Criticizing political institutions and beliefs Expressing frustration Galvanizing dissent (drawing people to the cause) Providing inspiration and uplift Offering alternatives Highlife  ­ combination of African dance music and Western sounds Drums, harmonicas, guitars, accordions Upbeat tourist­friendly, pleasantly African Popular after WWII, often encountered this music at upscale places Ex: E.T. Mensah & the Tempos Bebop  ­ a development in jazz music as a direct response to the homogenous and ubiquitous  swing Music for the sake of music, not for dancing, or even to sell albums Highly experimental, smaller ensembles, smaller audiences Resisted imitation so that especially white musicians couldn’t keep up Had a lot of solos and rhythm changes

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School: University of Maryland
Department: Music
Course: World Popular Musics and Identity
Professor: Laura Schnitker
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: final, exam, study, and guide
Name: Final Exam Study Guide
Description: Final Exam Study Guide on December 20, 2016. This should not be a substitute for your own notes.
Uploaded: 12/13/2016
13 Pages 37 Views 29 Unlocks
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