×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Tulane - SPHU 1020 - Study Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Tulane - SPHU 1020 - Study Guide

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

TULANE / Public Health / PH 1020 / How infections can trigger cancers?

How infections can trigger cancers?

How infections can trigger cancers?

Description

School: Tulane University
Department: Public Health
Course: Cell, Individual & the Community
Professor: Lorelei dickey-cropley
Term: Summer 2015
Tags:
Cost: 50
Name: Final Exam Review
Description: This outline covers everything from the study guide posted by Dr. Cropley.
Uploaded: 12/13/2016
11 Pages 51 Views 5 Unlocks
Reviews


SPHU 1020


How infections can trigger cancers?



Final Exam Review

Basic disease concepts and terms:

● zoonotic diseases: diseases spread between animals and people

● infectious disease control measures

○ WASH

● vector­borne diseases

Malaria

● pathogen: non­motile protozoan of genus Plasmodium

○ single­celled, nucleated

○ P. falciparum:

■ potentially fatal — infections cause most deaths 

■ can lead to cerebral malaria, which has 1 to 2% mortality

rate

■ can progress rapidly to severe malaria even with 

treatment

■ people in endemic areas can have some immunity

■ non­specific symptoms


What causes malaria?



○ P. vivax:

■ benign, uncomplicated

■ most people from West Africa are resistant

■ main problem is tendency to relapse

■ acute symptoms

● symptoms:

○ acute — anemia, jaundice, tender liver/spleen, thrombocytopenia

○ general — malarial paroxysm (alternate periods with symptoms and 

periods without symptoms), anemia, respiratory distress disease, fever, hypoglycemia,  mental status changes, tropical splenomegaly

● transmission: 

○ bite of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes

○ shared needles

○ transfusions

○ mother­to­fetus

● immunity:

○ innate immunity — first line of defense


What are food and water borne diseases?



We also discuss several other topics like What does process of aquisition entail?

○ acquired immunity — mother to child transferred (3­6 months of 

protection)

○ no complete immunity

● treatment and control:

○ personal protection measures

■ repellents with DEET

○ artemisinin­based combination therapies (ACTs)

■ some resistance to artemisinin, but ACTs still effective 

in almost all settings

○ insecticide­treated nets (ITNs)

■ reduce child mortality by around 20%

○ indoor residual spraying (IRS)

○ intermittent prevention treatment of pregnant women

HIV/AIDS

● movement from simians to humans:

○ consumption of bushmeat in Africa

○ HIV mutated in 1930s from a form exclusive to apes to one possible in 

humans

○ first human case found in African man 1959

● transmission:

○ sexual contact with infected partner

○ contact with contaminated blood or blood products

○ sharing blood­contaminated needles syringes

■ drug use with IV (highest frequency) or accidental 

needle use

○ mother to child

■ passage through placenta, contaminated blood or 

secretions during birth, breast milk — transmission rates lower with 

antiretrovirals

○ premastication We also discuss several other topics like Which tactic is best explained by hotspot hypothesis?

■ pre­chewing food

● trends:

○ 33% reduction in annual new HIV cases from 2001 to 2012

○ new HIV infections among children fell 52%

○ 90% of new HIV infections are in developing countries

○ greater access to antiretrovirals led to a 30 % drop in AIDS­related 

deaths from the peak in 2005

○ U.S.: deaths through Pneumocystis carinii

■ U.S. has one of largest populations of HIV­infected in 

the world

■ annual number of new infections is stable (around 

50,000)

○ other areas: deaths through tuberculosis

○ 40% of adult infections are women and 15% of infections are in  Don't forget about the age old question of What is scientific method and its steps?

individuals 15­25 years of age

● mechanism:

○ retrovirus — obligate parasite that targets host cell

○ reverse transcriptase used to produce DNA from its own RNA genome

○ new DNA is incorporated in host cell genome

○ host cell treats viral DNA as its own genome

○ HIV exits cell by budding

○ HIV attacks T cells (CD4+) and compromises immune system 

● AIDS:

○ acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

○ caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and is pandemic

○ signs and symptoms:

■ HIV­positive

■ low CD4+ (helper T) cell count

■ one or more opportunistic infections (bacterial, viral, 

protozoal, fungal)

■ swollen lymph nodes

■ sudden weight loss If you want to learn more check out What are executive orders used for?

■ Kaposi sarcoma (rare vascular cancer)

○ HIV­positive individuals progress to clinical AIDS without treatment 

over an incubation period that can vary in time

■ opportunistic diseases cause death

■ anyone with AIDS will die within 4 years

● treatment and control:

○ antiretroviral drugs (ARVs)

■ highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is a 

combination of antiretroviral drugs that are used to control retroviruses

■ can extend years between infection and onset of AIDS, 

as well as years between onset of AIDS and death

○ treatment of opportunistic infections

○ prevention measures

■ pre­exposure (PreP) and post­exposure (PEP)

○ testing

■ antibody tests; ELISA; western blot; rapid assessment; 

PCR tests

■ if positive, then test for CD4+ count, viral load, and drug

resistance

Tuberculosis (TB)

● causative agent: Mycobacterium tuberculosis

● manifestations:

○ infection (latent): 2 billion people infected with no sickness or symptoms

○ disease (active): 1/10 of infected people get the contagious form of the  Don't forget about the age old question of What was the largest migration in africa?

infection and have symptoms; 8­9 million new cases worldwide per year

● transmission: 

○ airborne

○ each person with active TB without treatment will infect an average of 

10 to 15 people annually

● current status:

○ in the U.S. and other developed countries, TB is a reemerging disease

○ TB is the leading cause of death for individuals with HIV/AIDS

■ TB and HIV coinfection — each accelerates the other’s 

progress 

■ those infected by HIV are 800x more likely to develop  If you want to learn more check out How do taxes affect supply?

active TB

○ emergence of multiple drug resistance and extremely drug resistant TB 

due to complacency and travel/immigration

● treatment and control:

○ 6­9 months of daily antibiotics, good nutrition, and rest

■ failure to take combination of drugs daily leads to drug 

resistance

○ DOTS (directly observed treatment)

● prevention:

○ improved social conditions (housing, water, nutrition)

○ vaccine is controversial

■ 80% protection in children and 50% protection in adults

○ DOTS implementation

Food­ and Water­Borne Diseases

● water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH):

○ basic human needs

○ prerequisite to human health and development

○ sanitation: disposal of human excreta

■ 6 F’s: feces, fields, fluid, fingers, food, flies

● water­borne diseases (WBDs): 

○ caused by pathogenic microbes that can be directly spread through 

contaminated water

○ most waterborne diseases cause gastrointestinal or diarrheal illness 

● types of toxins:

○ food intoxication/poisoning: ingestion of bacterial toxins (with or 

without the microbe)

○ food­borne infection: bacteria multiply in the intestinal tract, secrete an 

enterotoxin, and may invade cells of the intestinal tract

● food intoxication/poisoning:

○ Botulism: 

■ caused by deadly botulism neurotoxin of Clostridium 

botulinum (g+ spore­forming bacillus)

● found in soil and improperly home

canned foods

■ treatment of antitoxin and mechanical ventilation

■ signs and symptoms: double vision, droopy eyelids, 

slurred speech, muscle weakness, dry mouth, difficulty swallowing

○ Staphylococcus

■ caused by Staphylococcus aureus (g+ coccus)

● found in nasal passages

● heat stable enterotoxin

■ most common type of food poisoning

■ signs and symptoms: abdominal cramps, 

nausea/vomiting/diarrhea (NVD)

■ also causes blistering from scalded skin syndrome and 

toxic­shock syndrome

■ Methicillin­resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA):

● identified in 1970s in health care 

settings; leading cause of nosocomial infections in U.S.

● signs and symptoms: boils, rashes, skin 

and soft tissue infections, etc.

○ necrotizing fasciitis, 

also known as "flesh­eating bacteria”

● health care­associated MRSA: 

potentially deadly strain with antibiotic resistance

● community­associated MRSA: seen in 

young, healthy; more virulent; less resistant to antibiotics

● food­borne infection:

○ Salmonellosis

■ caused by species in genus Salmonella (g­ bacilli)

● found in eggs, meats, seafood, fruits 

vegetables

■ signs and symptoms: gastroenteritis, abdominal cramps, 

NVD, fever

■ typhoid fever: in less­developed countries; infection 

from fecally­contaminated food or hands; transmission by flies or fomites ● organism invades cells lining small 

intestine and causes ulcers and bloody stool

○ Shigellosis

■ caused by species in genus Shigella (g­ bacilli)

■ around 1 million annual deaths in developing countries

■ in U.S., daycares are prone to outbreaks

■ transmission: fecal­oral route

■ toxins: very destructive

■ signs and symptoms: gastroenteritis, dysentery

● food­ and water­borne diseases

○ Cholera

■ caused by Vibrio cholerae (g­ curved rod)

● produces enterotoxin that promotes 

secretion of fluid and electrolytes into lumen of gut

● found in brackish water

■ transmission: consumption of fecally­contaminated food 

and water

■ signs and symptoms: watery diarrhea, projectile 

vomiting

■ treatment of replacement of fluids, IV drugs, antibiotics

■ complications: 

● severe dehydration

● hypovolemic shock 

● acute renal failure

● death

● electrolyte imbalance

● hypoglycemia in children

○ Escherichia Coli

■ normally commensal organism, but can be pathogenic

■ 73,000 annual cases in U.S.

■ signs and symptoms: watery stool, vomiting, mild 

abdominal pain, moderate fever, moderate to severe dehydration

■ Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS):

● hemolytic anemia (anemia caused by 

destruction of red blood cells), acute kidney failure (uremia), and a low  platelet count (thrombocytopenia)

○ Campylobacteriosis

■ caused by Campylobacter jejuni (g­ curved bacilli)

■ most frequent cause of bacterial diarrhea in U.S.

■ signs and symptoms: severe diarrhea

■ transmission: raw meat, undercooked meat, 

unpasteurized milk

○ Leptospira

■ zoonotic disease in tropic areas

■ found in infected animal urine

■ signs and symptoms: flu­like

■ treatment of antibiotics

○ Listeriosis (“Deli Disease”)

■ caused by Listeria monocytogenes (g+ bacillus)

● distributed worldwide in cold cuts, hot 

dogs, soft cheeses, etc. (grows in refrigeration)

■ mild in healthy adults and children

○ Pseudomembranous colitis 

■ caused by Clostridium difficile (g+ spore­forming 

bacilli)

■ transmission: fecal­oral route

■ cause of nosocomial infection

● viruses:

○ Noroviruses

■ Norwalk/Norwalk­like viruses with many different 

strains

■ easily transmitted and can persist in environment

■ outbreaks associated with cruise ships, food service 

workers, hospitals, etc.

○ Rotaviruses

■ 200,000 emergency room visits in U.S.

■ signs and symptoms: flu­like before diarrhea, fever, 

cough, vomiting

● very common cause of diarrhea in U.S.

■ easily transmitted with low lethality and available 

vaccines

○ Hepatitis A

■ around 1.4 million cases globally per year

■ transmission: ingestion of contaminated food and water, 

direct contact

● associated with lack of safe water, poor 

sanitation

■ signs and symptoms: fever, malaise, loss of appetite, 

diarrhea, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark­coloured urine and jaundice ■ no treatment, but available vaccines

● recovery usually complete without 

chronic infection; rarely fatal, but can be debilitating

○ liver failure is 

associated with high mortality

○ Hepatitis E

■ around 20 million cases globally per year

● over 3 million acute cases

● 56,600 hepatitis E­related deaths

■ transmission: fecal­oral route (contaminated water)

● protozoan diseases:

○ Giardiasis

■ caused by Giardia lamblia (flagellated protozoan)

■ common water­borne disease in U.S.

● 2.5 million cases per year in U.S.

● 200 million cases per year globally

■ cysts:

● spread by human, wild mammal, and 

bird reservoirs

● persistent in environment

● destroy the intestinal villus

● resistant to chlorine and ID is only 10 

cysts

■ transmission: swallowing cysts in contaminated water, 

fecal­oral route

■ signs and symptoms: abdominal pain, non­bloody 

diarrhea

● not life­threatening, but can last 2­6 

weeks

○ Cryptosporidiosis

■ caused by Cryptosporidium parvum (non­motile 

protozoan)

● variety of mammal, bird, and reptile 

reservoirs

■ transmission: oocysts enter water in fecal material and 

are ingested

● oocysts resistant to chlorine and ID is 

only 10 oocysts

■ signs and symptoms: severe and long­lasting diarrhea (7­

10 days), fever, nausea, abdominal pain

■ usually self­limiting (treatment options limited)

● life­threatening for 

immunocompromised or AIDS patients

○ Amebiasis

■ caused by Entamoeba histolytica

● occurs worldwide in water, fruits and 

vegetables washed in contaminated water

■ 10% fatality rate while being one of most common 

parasitic diseases

■ signs and symptoms: 90% asymptomatic or have mild 

diarrhea and stomach pain

● severe dysentery causes fever, bloody 

stools, and stomach pain

● amoebas can cause deep ulcers and 

invade the kidneys, skin, brain, spleen, and liver (hepatitis)

○ Toxoplasmosis

■ caused by Toxoplasma gondii (non­motile protozoan)

● domestic and feral cats are reservoir and

host

■ worldwide zoonotic disease

■ transmission: ingestion of oocysts from cat feces or 

undercooked meats

■ signs and symptoms: asymptomatic, sore throat, fever, 

enlarged lymph nodes — all mild

■ dangerous for pregnant women and 

immunocompromised patients

Meningitis

● disease caused by inflammation of protective membranes covering brain/spinal cord  (meninges)

○ two common bacterial types — Haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB has

vaccine) and Neisseria meningitidis (leading cause of meningitis)

● symptoms: headache, fever, vomiting, lethargy, neck stiffness, rash, seizures ○ can appear quickly or over several days

● complications: bloodstream infection, rash

○ requires early treatment with antibiotics

○ disfigurement, amputation, kidney failure, death still possible with 

treatment

● relation to military in the past

○ now associated with college students (freshmen living in dorms)

Influenza

● respiratory disease caused by enveloped RNA viruses

○ RNA viruses enter using spikes or endocytosis and leaves by budding 

(surface antigenic protein spikes)

○ disappears within 2 weeks

○ infects humans and other species (highly infectious)

● symptoms: cold­like with headache, fever, muscle pain, severe cough, congestion ● transmission: droplets or aerosol (sneezing/coughing); seasonal outbreaks (winter);  crowding; fomites and other people

● strains:

○ type A: causes epidemics and pandemics; infects animals (bird flu)

○ type B: less severe; causes epidemics; no animal reservoir

○ type C: causes mild respiratory illness in humans

● antigenic change:

○ antigenic drift: type A only; major, abrupt antigenic change in spikes 

with rapid evolution of new strains that people have no immunity

■ recombination of genetic material from cells infected 

with different viral strains

○ antigenic shift: new variants of prevailing strains produced yearly

■ slow accumulation of mutations affect antigenicity of 

spikes

● animals’ roles: avian and swine

STDs

● transmitted by sexual contact

○ public health problem due to antibiotic resistant strains and HIV/AIDS 

coinfections

● syphilis

○ caused by Treponema pallidum (g­ spirochete)

○ can be congenital, leading to stillborns or deformities; acquired; late

○ only in humans

○ frequent coinfection with other STDs or HIV/AIDS

○ mostly MSM and aged 20­39

○ no vaccine

● gonorrhea

○ caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae (g­ diplococcus)

○ only in humans

○ mostly sexually active teens and young adults

○ transmitted through vaginal, anal, and oral sex

● chlamydia

○ caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (g­ coccobacillus; obligate 

intracellular parasite)

○ most common STD

○ mostly sexually active teens and young adults

● Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

○ DNA virus that infects epithelial cells

○ 100+ strains; persistent and has potential to cause cancer (cervical 

cancer)

■ cervical cancer most common in women in 20s to 30s

○ specific control programs

■ PAP screening

■ HPV vaccination (Gardasil and Cervarix)

Cancer

● how infections can trigger cancers: around 2 million cases of cancer from infection ○ some viruses directly affect genes inside cells that control growth

○ some infections cause long­term inflammation; leads to changes in 

affected/nearby cells

○ some infections suppress immune system

○ HPV

● leading cancer deaths in U.S.:

○ lung and bronchus

■ high rates of lung and bronchus cancer associated with 

in tobacco consumption (20­30 year delay)

○ then prostate (men) and breast (women)

■ prostate and breast cancer are more common, but lung 

cancer is more deadly

● incidence versus mortality

○ cancer is second leading cause of death in U.S. 

● importance of screening and stages of cancer:

○ stages of tumor development:

■ tumor begins to develop; altered cell and its descendants 

grow and divide rapidly; descendants divide excessively and look abnormal

● if tumor develops, this is stage 0 (situ)

■ some cells have additional mutations that allow tumor to

invade neighboring tissues and to shed cells into blood or lymph

● tumor is malignant and escaped cells 

can establish new tumors

○ best to treat before metastasis

● causes:

○ external and internal factors of metabolism act together or separately to 

cause cancer

○ preventable — cigarette smoking, overweight, obesity, nutrition

■ an estimated 30­40% of cancers are influenced by diet

■ foods or their components may cause, promote, or 

protect against cancer

■ nutrition transition: shift in dietary consumption and 

energy expenditure that coincides with economic, demographic, and 

epidemiological changes

Risk Factors for Chronic Diseases

● main factors

○ dietary factors associated with 4/10 leading causes of death (coronary 

heart disease, cancers, stroke, type 2 diabetes)

■ see above about preventable causes of cancer

○ saturated or trans fats

● types of obesity

○ apple vs. pear (body shape)

■ central abdominal obesity is worse than lower abdominal

obesity

● metabolic syndrome

○ combination of medical disorders or risk factors that increase risk of 

cardiovascular disease and diabetes together

Emerging Infectious Diseases

● definitions

○ re­emerging: new, re­emerging, or drug­resistant infections where human

incidence has increased in past 2 decades

■ new form or location, but existed for decades or 

centuries already

○ emerging: never been recognized in humans before; difficult to establish 

and rare

○ deliberately emerging: introduced (bioterrorism)

● factors involved in the emergence of infectious diseases 

○ human cause — population growth, climate change, technological 

advances, behavior

○ microbial evolution

○ local and global factors

○ poverty — fundamental cause of disadvantaged populations suffering 

more

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here