×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) - ECON 151 - Study Guide - Final
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) - ECON 151 - Study Guide - Final

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE (LSE) / Microeconomics / ECON 151 / Which of the following are changes in injections into, and which are c

Which of the following are changes in injections into, and which are c

Which of the following are changes in injections into, and which are c

Description

Answers to Workshop 10 The National Economy1. Position each of the following eight terms in the UK’s circular flow of income diagram below: Consumption (of domestically produced goods and services);    Net saving;    Net taxation; Government expenditure;    Factor payments (national income);    Expenditure on imports;    Investment;    Expenditure on exports. Economists use specific letters to label each of these terms.  The letters used are: S,   G,   X,   M,   I,   Cd,   T,   Y Attach the correct letter to each of the terms you have written on the diagram. Investment (I) Government Expenditure (G) Expenditure Factor payments (Y) Consumption of domestic goods and services (Cd) on Exports (X) Expenditure on Imports (M) Net taxation (T) Net saving (S) 2. Which of the following are changes in injections into, and which are changes in withdrawals from the UK’s circular flow of income?  In each case, identify whether the change is an increase or a decrease.  In each case, assume that this is the only change.  (Delete wrong words.) (a) A council funds the building of new libraries. .......................................Injection   Increase (b) The government raises tax­free thresholds. .......................................Withdrawal  Decrease (c) The government reduces child benefit. ..............................................Withdrawal   Increase (d) Fewer tourists visit the UK.....................................................................Injection   Decrease (e) Firms, anticipating a rise in consumer demand, borrow more money in order to build up their stocks. ........................................Injection   Increase (f) Consumers demand more goods that are domestically produced (but total consumption does not change). ..........................................Withdrawal  Decrease (g) People invest more money in banks and building societies. ..............Withdrawal   Increase 23. What will happen to the level of the UK’s national income if the following changes occur?  (In each case assume other things remain unchanged.) (a) Firms are encouraged by lower interest rates to build new factories. Rise (b) Consumers abroad are deterred by a high price for the pound from buying imports from the UK. Fall (c) Both taxation and government expenditure are reduced. Impossible to tell without more information You would need to know the respective sizes of the reduction in taxation (a reduction in withdrawals) and the reduction in government expenditure (a reduction in injections). (d) People decide to save a larger proportion of their income. Fall (e) Our trading partners abroad begin to recover from recession. Rise As they recover from recession, so consumer spending will increase. Part of the extra spending will go on UK exports (an injection into the UK's circular flow of income). 4. What would be the effect of each of the following events on actual and potential economic growth? (Assume no other changes take place.) (a) A reduction in the level of investment. Actual growth: fall Potential growth: fall (b) People save a larger proportion of their income.  Actual growth: fall Potential growth: rise (c) Increased expenditure on education and training.  Actual growth: rise Potential growth: rise (d) The discovery of new more efficient techniques which could benefit industry generally Actual growth: no effect Potential growth: rise (e) A reduction in interest rates.  Actual growth: rise Potential growth: rise (because of higher investment and hence increased production capacity in the economy) 3             5. Firm A sells some raw materials to firm B for £120. Firm B then processes them and sells them to firm C for £160. Firm C uses them to produce a finished good, which it sells to a wholesaler for £300, which then sells it to a retailer for £350, which then adds a £25 mark up. (a) Assuming no VAT in this country, use a value­added approach to calculate the total value of production. £120 + £40 + £140 + £50 + £25 = £375 (Note that this is the final value of the good.) (b) Assume now that the values given above include a 10% VAT at each stage. What is the  total value of production now (i.e. excluding VAT)? £340.91 (£375 includes 10% tax, based on the pre­tax figure. The pre­tax figure must therefore be £375/1.1 = £340.91) 6. One method of calculating GDP is to add up the values added in the production of all goods and services in the economy. When calculating GDP from gross value added (GVA) statistics, what should be done with the figures for the following? (a) Taxes on incomes.........................................................................................................ignore (b) Taxes on goods and services (e.g. VAT) ..........................................................................add (c) Subsidies on production............................................................................................subtract 7. Given the following data on UK expenditure in 2003: £bn Final consumption expenditure by households and non­profit institutions....................725.0 Government final consumption expenditure...................................................................231.8 Gross fixed capital formation.........................................................................................175.9 Changes in inventories......................................................................................................+4.2 Imports of goods and services........................................................................................313.2 Net income from abroad.................................................................................................+22.4 Exports of goods and services........................................................................................282.2 Fixed capital consumption (depreciation).......................................................................115.3 Calculate: (a) Gross domestic product (at market prices) £725.0bn + £231.8bn + £175.9bn + £4.2bn – £313.2bn + £282.2bn = £1105.9bn  (b) Net national income £1105.9bn +£22.3bn – £115.3bn = £1012.9bn  48. Which of the following should be included when measuring GDP by the income method? (a) Wages and salaries.............................................................................................................Yes (b) Tax income of the government...........................................................................................No (c) Profits of private companies .............................................................................................Yes (d) Profits of government­owned enterprises .........................................................................Yes (e) Amount spent on stocks and shares ...................................................................................No (f) Taxes on products ..................................................................Yes (to get from GVA to GDP) (g) Government pensions and allowances ...................No (these are merely transfer payments) (h) Rent on land ......................................................................................................................Yes 9. When calculating real GDP we must use the GDP deflator for that year. This allows us to adjust figures measured in current prices for the rate of inflation, and show them in terms of a base year. Assume that GDP in current prices grows from £120bn in year 1 to £160bn in year 2 and that the GDP deflator rises from 100 in year 1 to 130 in year 2, by how much has real GDP grown? 2.56% This is calculated as follows:  Real GDP = Nominal GDP/GDP deflator × 100. Thus in year 1, real GDP = £120bn/100 × 100 = £120bn and in year 2, real GDP = £160bn/130 × 100 = £123.07bn ∴ real GDP has grown by (123.07 – 120)/120 × 100 = 2.56% 10. Give three reasons why GDP may be poor indicator of society’s well­being. Three reasons are given in section 13.3 of the text:  (a) Production does not equal consumption. Production is desirable only to the extent that it enables us to consume more. If GDP rises as a result of a rise in investment, this will not lead to an increase in current living standards. It will, of course, help to raise future consumption. (b) The human costs of production. If production increases, this may be due to technological advance. If, however, it increases as a result of people having to work harder or longer hours, its net benefit will be less. Leisure is a desirable good, and so too are pleasant working conditions, but these items are not included in the GDP figures. (c) GDP ignores externalities. The rapid growth in industrial society is recorded in GDP statistics. What the statistics do not record are the environmental side effects: the polluted air and rivers, the ozone depletion, the problem of global warming. If these external costs were taken into account, the net benefits of industrial production might be much less. 5Answers to Workshop 1 1. Which of the following are macroeconomic topics/issues and which are microeconomic ones? Introducing Economics(a) The level of consumer spending.....................................................................................Macro (b) Subsidies paid to farmers ...............................................................................................Micro (c) The level of UK exports.................................................................................................Macro (d) The price of DVDs.........................................................................................................Micro (e) The rate of unemployment ............................................................................................Macro (f) The average wage rate paid to textile workers ...............................................................Micro (g) The total amount spent by UK consumers on clothing and footwear ..............................Micro (h) The amount saved last year by UK households .............................................................Macro 2. Economists assume that economic decisions are made rationally. In the case of consumers, rational decision making means: (a) That consumers will not buy goods which increase their satisfaction by only a small amount. False (b) That consumers will attempt to maximise their individual satisfaction for the income they earn.  True  (c) That consumers buy the sorts of goods that the average person buys................................False (d) That consumers seek to get the best value for money from the goods they buy.................True 3.  Make a list of three things you did yesterday.  What was the opportunity cost of each?  Have a look at your neighbours’ lists and see if you agree with their estimates of the opportunity costs. In each case you should think of the next best thing you could have done with your time or money, because it is that which you effectively ‘gave up’ to do the thing you chose to do. So, by choosing to go to the cinema, for example, the opportunity cost is what you could have done with the money you spent on the ticket and transport, and with the time spent at the cinema.  24. A country is capable of producing the following combinations of goods and services per period of time, assuming that it makes full use of its resources of land, labour and capital. Goods (units) 100 80 60 40 20 0 Services (units) 0 50 90 120 140 150


What will happen to the level of the UK’s national income if the following changes occur?



Don't forget about the age old question of peyton approved income statement

(a) Draw the production possibility curve for this country on the following diagram. sdoo 120 100 80 60 The   curve   shows   all   the   possible combinations  of two goods that a country can produce within a given time period.  If a country was fully using its  resources, then  it would produce somewhere on  the curve. If   there   was   unemployment   or G 40 20 0 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 Services under­utilisation   of   one   or   more factors  of production,  the country would   be   producing   inside   the curve.     The   country   could   not produce beyond the curve. .......................................................... (b) Is it possible for this country to produce the following combinations of goods and services? (i)  80 units of goods and 50 units of services...............................................Yes (on the curve) (ii)  70 units of goods and 90 units of services.......................................No  (outside the curve) (iii) 40 units of goods and 100 units of services......................................Yes  (inside the curve) (c) What is the opportunity cost (in terms of services) of producing 20 extra units of goods when this country is initially producing: (i) 60 units of goods.....................................................................40 units of services (90–50) (ii) 20 units of goods.................................................................20 units of services (140–120) Here, the opportunity cost of producing more goods is the reduction in the production of services that this entails. In the case of (i), producing an extra 20 units of goods would mean that production was now at 80 units. From the table, and the curve, you can see that this will allow a maximum of 50 units of services to be produced. Thus production of services has fallen from a maximum of 90 to a maximum of 50 units: a fall of 40 units. Thus 40 units of services is the opportunity cost. In the case of (ii), moving from producing 20 units of goods to 40 units means moving from 140 units of services to 120 units: an opportunity cost of 20 units of services. 3           5. (a) Referring back to question 4, assume now that technological progress allows a four­fold increase in the output of goods and double the amount of services for any given amount of resources. Assuming that the country’s total amount of resources stays the same, fill in the new figures on the following table to show the new production possibilities. Goods (units) 400 320 240 160 80 0 Services (units) 0 100 180 240 280 300


What would be the effect of each of the following events on actual and potential economic growth?



If you want to learn more check out nus cm

(b) Draw the new production possibility curve on the following diagram. 480 400 320 sd o o G 240 160 80 0 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Services (c) How has this technological progress affected the opportunity cost of a unit of goods. (Tick the correct one of the following answers.) A. Stays the same. B. Doubles. C. Halves.   D. Increases four times. E. Decreases four times. If you can produce four times as many units of goods and twice as many units of services with a given amount of resources, then, as production moves from services to goods, only half as many units of services will need to be sacrificed for each extra unit of goods (compared with the situation before the technological progress). 4 6. In Country A, which has full employment of its resources, a large increase in the production of goods and services provided by the public sector (such as health, education and new roads) would only be possible if there were a reduction in the production of other goods and services, such as consumer goods. In Country B, however, which is suffering from economic recession, it is argued that an increase in public expenditure on such things as health, education and roads, would result in the production of more consumer goods. (a) Explain briefly why the effect of an increase in public expenditure on the production of consumer goods would be different in the two countries. In Country A, with resources fully employed, there could only be an increase in the production of certain goods and services (in this case health, education, new roads, etc.) by diverting resources away from the production of other goods. In Country B, however, by using resources more fully, there could be an increase in production of all goods. In fact, an increase in expenditure on public services, by increasing the incomes of those employed in the public sector, could lead to more expenditure on consumer goods, and this would stimulate firms to produce more of them to meet the extra demand. (b) The following diagrams show the production possibility curves for the Countries A and B. Mark the current production point on each diagram at a point consistent with the statement above. Then mark a new position on each diagram that would result from an increase in public expenditure. Country A Country B(c) Explain your answer to (b). In each case there is a movement from point a to point b.  In the case of Country A, which is already producing on the production possibility curve, there is a movement along the curve, showing that the opportunity cost of producing more public­sector goods and services is the amount of private­sector goods and services that have to be sacrificed. In the case of Country B, production was inside the production possibility curve. By making a fuller use of resources, more of both categories of goods and services can be produced: point b is closer to the production possibility curve than is a. 5 Answers to Workshop 17 1. This question looks at the theory of comparative advantage.  Imagine a world in which there are International Tradejust two countries, F and G, and just two goods, X and Y. Consider the following six situations.  Each one shows alternative amounts of goods X and Y that the two countries can produce for a given amount of resources.  Assume constant costs.  In each case give the (pre­trade) opportunity cost of X in terms of Y. (a) Country F: 10 units of X or 20 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 2Y Country G: 10 units of X or 10 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 1Y (b) Country F: 12 units of X or 12 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 1Y Country G: 6 units of X or 8 units of Y. ........................................................1X = 1.33Y (c) Country F: 8 units of X or 8 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 1Y Country G: 10 units of X or 10 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 1Y (d) Country F: 20 units of X or 5 units of Y. ........................................................1X = 0.25Y Country G: 18 units of X or 2 units of Y. ........................................................1X = 0.11Y (e) Country F: 10 units of X or 8 units of Y. ..........................................................1X = 0.8Y Country G: 6 units of X or 6 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 1Y (f) Country F: 2 units of X or 4 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 2Y Country G: 3 units of X or 6 units of Y. .............................................................1X = 2Y 2. Referring to the six different situations given in Q1, and assuming no transport costs: (a) In which situations will country F export good X and import good Y?  ..................(b), (e) (b) In which situations will country F export good Y and import good X?  ..................(a), (d) (c) In which situations will country F export both goods? .....................none d) In which situations will country F import both goods .....................none (e) In which situations will no trade take place?   ...................(c), (f) 23. In situation (a) in Q1, assume that before trade the price ratios of the two goods were equal to their opportunity cost ratios.  (a) What would the pre­trade price ratio (PX/PY) be in country F? ...........................2 (b) What would the pre­trade price ratio (PX/PY) be in country G? ...........................1 (c) Now   assume   that   trade   is   opened   up  and   that   1   unit   of   X   exchanges   for  1.5   of  Y. Demonstrate how both countries have gained.  Country F has gained because, before trade, to obtain 1 unit of X it had to sacrifice 2 units of Y (the opportunity cost of X was 2Y); whereas with trade, it can import 1 unit of X by exporting only 1.5 units of Y (the opportunity cost of X is now only 1.5Y). Country G has gained because, before trade, to obtain 1 unit of Y, it had to sacrifice 1 unit of X (the opportunity cost of Y was 1X); whereas with trade, it can import 1 unit of Y by exporting only 2/3 of a unit of X (the opportunity cost of Y is now only 0.67Y). 4. The following is a list of other factors that can make trade beneficial. (i) Decreasing costs. (ii) Differences in demand. (iii) Increased competition. (iv) Trade is an engine of growth. (v) Non­economic factors. Into which one of these five categories do the following examples fit? (a) When the rest­of­the­world economy expands, this will increase the demand for a country’s exports and also raise its export prices relative to import prices. ............(iv) (b) By specialising in certain exports the country may become increasingly skilled in their production.         .............(i) (c) Free trade between countries may encourage closer political co­operation .............(v) (d) Allowing imports freely into a country may stimulate domestic producers to be more efficient.         ...........(iii) (e) Consumer tastes for products differ between different countries.         ............(ii) 35. The following are various methods of intervening in trade: (i) Tariffs (ii) Quotas (iii) Exchange controls (iv) Import licensing (v) Export subsidies (vi) Embargoes (vii) Administrative barriers Match each of the above to the following: (a) A ban on the importation of illegal drugs.         ............(vi) (b) A government imposed restriction on the number of cars that may be imported from Japan. ............(ii) (c) The dumping of surplus EU wheat at artificially low prices on the international market .............(v) (d) The exclusion of imports that do not meet rigid safety standards ..........(vii) (e) Customs duties on tobacco and alcoholic drinks .............(i) (f) A tax imposed by the government on foreign currency deals. ...........(iii) (g) The granting of import permits solely to officially recognised importers. ............(iv) 6. What is fallacious about the following two arguments?  Is there any truth in either? (a) ‘Imports should be reduced because money is going abroad which would be better spent at home.’ Imports are consumed and thus add directly to the standard of living. Also, provided that they are matched by exports, there is no net outflow of money. Trade, because of the law of   comparative   advantage   allows   countries   to   increase   their   standard   of   living:   to consume more than they would otherwise be able to do. (b) ‘We should protect our industries from being undercut by imports produced using cheap labour.’ Importing cheap goods from, say, African countries, allows more goods to be consumed. The UK uses less resources by buying these goods through the production and sale of exports, than by producing them at home.  However, there will be a cost to certain UK workers whose jobs are lost through foreign competition. 47. The following diagram shows a country’s domestic demand and supply curves (Ddom and Sdom) for a particular product. Part of demand is satisfied by imports. The country is a price taker and the world price of the product is given by Pworld with the world supply given by Sworld. A tariff is then imposed on the product whose amount is shown is shown by the vertical difference between Sworld and Sworld + tariff. P Sdom (=MC) 1 PW + t Tariff PW O 2 3 4 5 6 7


When calculating GDP from gross value added (GVA) statistics, what should be done with the figures for the following?



Don't forget about the age old question of What formula is used to determine escape velocity?

Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 S world + tariff S world Ddom Q (a) How much is imported before the tariff is imposed? .............................Q2 – Q1 (b) How much is imported after the tariff is imposed? .............................Q4 – Q3 (c) Which   area(s)   represent   the   consumer   surplus  before  the   imposition   of   the   tariff? 1+2+3+4+5+6 (d) Which area(s) represent the consumer surplus after the imposition of the tariff?................1+2 (e) Which area(s) represent the loss in consumer surplus from the tariff?....................................... 3+4+5+6 (f) Which area(s) represent the producer surplus before the imposition of the tariff?...................7 (g) Which area(s) represent the producer surplus after the imposition of the tariff?.................3+7 (h) Which area(s) represent the gain in producer surplus from the tariff?....................................... 3 (i) Which area(s) represent tariff revenue to the government (a gain) from the tariff?.................5 (j) Which area(s) represent the net cost to society from the tariff? ...................................4+6 (i.e. the gain in producer surplus (3) and government tariff revenue (5) 5 minus the loss in consumer surplus (3+4+5+6)) 68. Give three economic advantages of the development of the single market in the EU. 1.   .........................................................................................................................Trade creation 2. ............................................................................................................Increased competition 3. ........................Economies of scale, with firms better able to operate on an EU­wide scale 9. A complete common market also entails problems. In which of the following cases have there been or are likely to be adverse regional multiplier effects from the development of the single market in the EU? (a) Population is concentrated towards the geographical centre of the EU............................Yes (b) Firms gain substantial plant economies by centralising production. ................................Yes (c) Rents and land prices are flexible. .....................................................................................No (d) A large proportion of the EU budget is spent on regional policy. .....................................No (e) The   impossibility   of   the   12   euro­zone   countries   altering   exchange   rates   between themselves. Yes (f) The development of information technology reduces communication costs. ...................No (g) Infrastructure expenditure is financed locally. .................................................................Yes 10. Although the development of a single market in the EU has led to trade creation, it has also led, or could lead, to trade diversion. Which of the following cases has or will make trade diversion more likely? (a) There were initially substantial internal barriers to trade which are now virtually all abolished. ..........................................................................................................................Yes (b) External barriers remain high.  .........................................................................................Yes (c) European industries have a wide range of available technologies and skills. ...................No (d) Many European industries experience decreasing (long­run) average costs at the level of individual national markets.  .........................................................................................No 7Answers to Workshop 3 1. (a) The price elasticity of demand measures the responsiveness of  the quantity demanded to a change in price.   Elasticity(b) Give the formula for price elasticity of demand. See formula in question 4 below. 2. Back in the mid­1990s, the government in the UK announced that for every 10 per cent rise in the price of cigarettes, the demand was likely to fall by 6 per cent.  If this information was correct, what was the value of the price elasticity of demand for cigarettes at the time?. –0.6  (= –6%/10%) 3. In each of the following pairs, tick which of the two items is likely to have the more elastic demand.  Give reasons for your answer. √ (a) Petrol (all brands)  Esso petrol There is no close substitute for petrol. If the price of petrol went up, the quantity demanded would fall only slightly, as people would still need fuel for their cars. If the price of Esso petrol went up, however (assuming that the prices of other brands had not changed), people could easily switch to other brands. √ (b) Holidays abroad Bread People could easily substitute cheaper holidays, at home or abroad, if the price of foreign holidays rose. The substitutes for bread are less close, and people spend a relatively small proportion of their income on bread. A rise in the price of bread, therefore, is likely to result in only a small fall in the quantity demanded. √ (c) Salt Clothing People spend such a small proportion of their income on salt that they could easily afford to pay a higher price – and would probably not even be aware that the price had risen. Do you know the price of a drum of salt? 4. The formula for price elasticity of demand is as follows: Proportionate (or percentage) change in quantity demanded Proportionate (or percentage) change in price This can be summarised as: ΔQd / mid Qd  ÷ ΔP / mid P The following table shows the quantity of a product demanded at two different prices: P Qd 16 14 25 35 (a) Calculate the proportionate change in quantity demanded when price falls from £16 to £14. (Use the first part of the formula, i.e. ΔQd / mid Qd , to do your calculation.) ΔQd / mid Qd = 10/30 = 0.33 (b) Calculate the proportionate change in price when price falls from £16 to £14. (Use the second part of the formula, i.e. ΔP / mid P, to do your calculation.) ΔP/ mid P = –2/15 = –0.13 (c) What is the price elasticity of demand between £16 and £14? ΔQd / mid Qd  ÷ ΔP / mid P = 0.33/–0.13 = –2.5 25. The following diagram shows two demand curves that cross at a price of  P0.  Price P0 P1 

If you want to learn more check out Know the difference between population & sample, parameter & statistic.

D2 D1 Q0 Q1 Q2 Which of the following statements are true? Quantity (a) Curve D1 is inelastic and curve D2 elastic........................................................................False The price elasticity of demand decreases as you move down a straight­line demand ‘curve’, so you can only compare elasticity at particular points on the two curves or over particular segments.  (b) Demand is more elastic between P0 and P1 along curve D2 than along curve D1...............True There is a bigger change in quantity demanded for the given change in price along curve  D2. (c) The price elasticity of demand between P0 and P1 in the case of curve D2 is equal to: Q2 − Q0                  P0 − P1                             ÷               .................................................................................................... True    mid Q              mid P (d) For any given change in price there will be a larger proportionate change in quantity along  curve D1 than along curve D2. ..........................................................................................False The opposite is true. 36. Fill in the rest of the following table: (For the final column use the formula: ΔQd / mid Qd  ÷ ΔP / mid P) Quantity demanded (000s)   7   9 11 13 Price (£) 13 11   9   7 Total consumer expenditure 91 99 99 91 Elastic or inelastic demand elastic unit elastic inelastic Price elasticity of demand –1.5 –1 –0.67 7. (a) What is the formula for  income elasticity of demand?...................ΔQd / mid Qd  ÷ ΔY / mid Y (where Y is income) (b) Which of the following would you expect to have a demand which is elastic with respect to income? (There are more than one.) (i) Flour............................................................................................................................No (ii) Ready­prepared meals for the microwave ..................................................................Yes (iii) Champagne.................................................................................................................Yes (iv) Socks ....................................................................Possibly (if they were designer socks) (v) Designer jeans............................................................................................................Yes (vi) Electricity.......Possibly (if luxury appliances use a relatively large amount of electricity) (vii) Bus journeys................................................................................................................No (viii)Insurance....................................................................................................................Yes 4Answers to Workshop 18 Balance of Payments and 1. The following are the various elements of the UK balance of payments account: (a) Imports of goods (−) (b) Exports of goods (+) (c) Imports of services (−) (d) Exports of services (+) (e) Other income and current outflows (−) (f) Other income and current inflows (+) (g) Transfers of capital from the UK (–) (h) Transfers of capital to the UK (+) Exchange Rates(i) Direct and portfolio UK investment overseas (−) (j) Direct and portfolio investment in UK (+) (k) Other (mainly short­term) financial outflows (−) (l) Other (mainly short­term) financial inflows (+) (m) Adding to reserves (−) (n) Drawing on reserves (+) Into which of the above categories would you put the following? (i) Video recorders imported from Japan............................................................................(a) (ii)  Insurance cover purchased at Lloyds in London by overseas residents.........................(d) (iii) UK gives aid to finance capital project in a developing country...................................(g) (iv)  Japanese car company purchases factory in UK.............................................................(j) (v)  UK residents taking holidays in Florida.........................................................................(c) (vi)  Interest earned by UK residents on assets abroad...........................................................(f) (vii) Running down the stock of foreign exchange in the Bank of England..........................(n) (viii) New deposits made in banks in the UK by overseas residents.......................................(l) (ix) Scotch whisky sold in France.........................................................................................(b) (x)  UK insurance company sets up branch in Canada..........................................................(i) 2. The following shows how the UK’s balance of payments account is set out. CREDITS DEBITS (1) Exports of goods (2) Imports of goods 1 – 2 = Balance on trade in goods (3) Exports of services (4) Imports of services 3 – 4 = Balance on trade in services (1 – 2) + (3 – 4) = Balance on trade in goods and services (5) Incomes and current transfers from abroad (6) Incomes and current transfers going abroad 5 – 6 = Other income flows (1 – 2) + (3 – 4) + (5 – 6) = Current account balance (7) Transfers of capital to UK from abroad (8) Transfers of capital abroad from UK 7 – 8 Capital account balance (9) Net investment in the UK from abroad (10) UK net investment abroad (11) Short­term financial inflows to UK (12) Short­term financial outflows from UK either (13) Drawing on reserves or (14) Adding to reserves (9 – 10) + (11 – 12) + (either 13 or 14) = Financial account balance Current account balance + Capital account balance + Financial account balance = Overall balance of payments Overall balance of payments plus net errors and omissions = 0

If you want to learn more check out Discuss the calculating of net income.

The following are the items in the UK’s 2000 balance of payments (£ billions) Exports of services............................................................................67.2 Exports of goods.............................................................................187.1 UK net investment abroad (direct and portfolio)............................250.6 Reserves (adding to = –ve)...............................................................–3.9 Short­term financial inflows to UK................................................281.8 Short­term financial outflows from UK..........................................270.9 Capital transfers to UK from abroad...................................................2.8 Capital transfers abroad from the UK.................................................0.8 Net incomes and current transfers from/to abroad...........................+1.7 Imports of goods.............................................................................215.9 Imports of services............................................................................56.3 Net investment in the UK from abroad (direct and portfolio)........260.8 Using the table above, work out the figures for the UK for the following: (a) The balance on trade in goods and services...............................................Deficit of £17.9bn (b) The current account balance......................................................................Deficit of £16.2bn (c) The capital account balance.......................................................................Surplus of £2.0bn (d) The financial account balance..................................................................Surplus of £17.2bn (e) Net errors and omissions............................................................................................–£3.0bn 23. The following diagram shows a demand curve and supply curve of sterling against the euro. £ / € 1.80 1.70 1.60 1.50 1.40 1.30 S2 D2D1 Q of sterling S1 (a) Who is demanding sterling in the diagram and for what purpose? Overseas residents for the purpose of buying UK exports and investing in the UK. (b) Who is supplying sterling in the diagram and for what purpose? UK residents for the purpose of buying imports or investing abroad. (c) Mark the equilibrium exchange rate. ....................................................€1.50 (See diagram) (d) Now   illustrate   what   happens   when   there   is   an   increased   demand   for   sterling   and   a decreased supply.................................................................................................See diagram (e) Has the exchange rate appreciated or depreciated?.............................................Appreciated 4. Assume that there is a free­floating exchange rate.  Will the following cause the exchange rate to appreciate or depreciate?  In each case you should consider whether there is a shift in the demand or supply curves of sterling (or both) and which way the curve(s) shift(s). (a) Imports increase. Demand curve: no shift Supply curve shifts right Exchange rate depreciates (b) UK interest rates rise relative to those abroad. Demand curve shifts right Supply curve shifts left Exchange rate appreciates (c) The UK experiences a lower rate of inflation than other countries (assuming no change in interest rates). Demand curve shifts right Supply curve shifts left Exchange rate appreciates (d) Speculators believe that the rate of exchange will fall. Demand curve shifts left Supply curve shifts right Exchange rate depreciates 3 5. Assume that the government wishes to pursue a deflationary policy. (a) What will happen to the exchange rate if it uses deflationary monetary policy?  Appreciate (because of higher interest rates) (b) What effect will this exchange rate movement have on aggregate demand?  Decrease it (exports will fall (an injection) and imports will rise (a withdrawal)) (c) What will happen to the exchange rate if it uses deflationary fiscal policy? Depreciate (because the lower demand for money will reduce interest rates) (d) What effect will this exchange rate movement have on aggregate demand? Increase it (exports will rise and imports will fall) 6. The use of interest rates as the main instrument for stabilising the exchange rate can often led to conflicts with internal policy objectives.  In which of the following cases is there a clear conflict between internal  and external  policy objectives, if interest rate changes are the only policy instrument available to the government or central bank for achieving both sets of objectives? (a) The government (or central bank) wants to prevent an appreciation of the exchange rate and  to reduce demand­deficient unemployment. No (b) The government (or central bank) wants to help domestic exporters and to reduce the rate of  inflation.        Yes (c) The government (or central bank) wants to reduce the price of imports and to curb the rate of growth in the money supply.        No (d) The government (or central bank) wants to prevent a depreciation of the exchange rate and to stimulate investment.   Yes (e) The government (or central bank) wants to halt a rise in the exchange rate and to reduce the  rate of growth of the money supply.        Yes (f) The government (or central bank) wants to reverse a recent fall in the exchange rate and to  reduce its unpopularity with home owners.  Yes 7. Which of the following are likely to contribute to the volatility of exchange rates between the major currencies? (a) A growth in the size of short­term financial flows relative to current account flows. Yes (b) The abolition of exchange controls.        Yes (c) A harmonisation of international macroeconomic policies.        No (d) The adoption of money supply targets by individual countries.        Yes (e) The adoption of exchange rate targets by individual countries.        No (f) The adoption of inflation targets by individual countries.        No (g) A growing belief that speculation against exchange rate movements is likely to be  stabilising.        No (h) A growing belief that speculation against exchange rate movements is likely to be  destabilising.        Yes (i) A growing ease of international transfers of funds.        Yes (j) Countries’ business cycles become more synchronised with each other.        No 4Answers to Workshop 5 1. (a) Complete the following table of costs for a firm.   (Note: enter the figures in the  MC Background to Supplycolumn between outputs of  0 and 1, 1 and 2, 2 and 3, etc.)  Output TC  (£) AC  (£) MC  (£) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10      55   85 110 130 160 210 280 370 480 610 760 – 85 55    43.3 40 42    46.7    52.9 60    67.8 76 30 25 20 30 50 70 90 110  130  150  (b) How much is total fixed cost at: (i) an output of 0?....................................................................................................  £55.00 (ii) an output of 6?......................................................................................................£55.00 (c) How much is average fixed cost at: (i) an output of 5?......................................................................................................£11.00 (ii) an output of 10?......................................................................................................£5.50 (d) How much is total variable cost at an output of 5?....................................................£155.00 (e) How much is average variable cost at an output of 10?...............................................£70.50 2. (a) Referring to the data from question 1, draw the firm’s average and marginal cost curves on the following diagram.  (Remember to plot MC  mid­way  between the quantity figures.) ) £(s tso C

MC

AC

AR = P = MR

We also discuss several other topics like Descibe the functionality of a Family.

140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Output

MC

Mark on the diagram the output at which diminishing returns set in.

See point x, where MC begins to rise

Assume that the firm is a price taker and faces a market price of £60 per unit.

AC

Draw the firm’s 

AR  and  MR

 curves on the above diagram. ...............................

AR = P = MR

How much will it produce in order to maximise profit?................

5 units, where MC = MR

X

Shade in the amount of profit it makes...............................................................

140 (b)  120 100 (c) )£80 (s tso C 60 See diagram (d)  40 20 (e) See diagram 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Output (f) Calculate how much profit this is.  .....................................TR – TC = (5 × £60) – (5 × £42) = £300 – £210 = £90 2 3. The following is a list of various types of economies of scale: (i) The firm can benefit from the specialisation and division of labour. (ii) It can overcome the problem of indivisibilities. (iii) It can obtain inputs at a lower price. (iv) Large containers/machines have a greater capacity relative to their surface area. (v) The firm may be able to obtain finance at lower cost. (vi) It becomes economical to sell by­products. (vii) Production can take place in integrated plants. (viii) Risks can be spread with a larger number of products or plants. Match each of the following examples for a particular firm to one of these types of economy of scale. (a) Delivery vans can carry full loads to single destinations.  (ii) (b) It can more easily make a public issue of shares.      (v) (c) It can diversify into other markets.       (viii) (d) Workers spend less time having to train for a wide variety of different tasks, and less time moving from task to task.       (i) (e) It negotiates bulk discount with a supplier of raw materials.       (iii) (f) It uses large warehouses to store its raw materials and finished goods.       (iv) (g) A clothing manufacturer does a deal to supply a soft toy manufacturer with offcuts for stuffing toys.        (vi) (h) Conveyor belts transfer the product through several stages of the manufacturing process.         (vii) 3This page consists of three multiple choice questions In each case, circle the correct answer. 4. If, at the current level of output, a firm’s average cost is greater than its marginal cost, then: A. An increase in output must raise average its cost still further above marginal cost. B. A reduction in output would raise average cost. C. The firm is producing beyond its minimum average cost level. D. The marginal cost curve must be downward sloping at the current level of output. E. Average fixed cost must be constant. 5. A firm discovers that if it either increases or reduces output, its short­run average cost increases. It follows that: A. The firm is maximising profit at its present output. B. The firm is maximising its marginal cost at its present at its present output. C. The firm is producing at the point where marginal cost equals average cost. D. Diseconomies of scale are present. E. Total costs are at a minimum. 6. The   information   in   the   following   table   relates   to   a   firm’s   average   and   marginal   costs   of operating each of three plants (X, Y and Z).  Each plant has a U­shaped average cost curve. Plant Plant X Plant Y Plant Z Average cost (£) Marginal cost (£) 16 16 14 13 14 16 The firm is a price taker, selling its product for £15 per unit.  In order to maximise profit, the firm in the long run will: A. Expand production at plant X, shut down plant Y and reduce production at plant Z. B. Expand production at plant X, reduce production at plant Y and shut down plant Z. C. Shut down plant X, expand production at plant Y and reduce production at plant Z. D. Shut down plant X, reduce production at plant Y and expand production at plant Z. E. Reduce production at plant X, expand production at plant Y and shut down plant Z. 4Answers to Workshop 7 1. From the list of points below select those which distinguish a monopolistically competitive Imperfect Competitionindustry from a perfectly competitive industry. (a) There are no barriers to the entry of new firms into the market...........................................No (b) Firms in the industry produce differentiated products. ......................................................Yes (c) The industry is characterised by a mass of sellers, each with a small market share.............No (d) A downward sloping demand curve means the firm has some control over the product's price...................................................................................................................................Yes (e) In the long run only normal profits will be earned...............................................................No (f) Advertising plays a key role in bringing the product to the attention of the consumer.......Yes 2. The following diagram illustrates a firm under monopolistic competition. MC AC e c irPP6 P5 P3P4 P2 P1 0 AR MR Q1 Q2 Q3Q4 Q5 Quantity (a) Label the curves. .................................................................................................See diagram (b) Does the diagram represent the short­run or long­run position?...............................Short­run (c) Is P3 the long­run equilibrium price? (explain). No. The long­run equilibrium price is where the (downward­sloping) AR curve is tangential to the AC curve. (d) What are the profit maximising output and price?...........P6 , Q2 (the output where MR = MC) (e) On the diagram, shade in the amount of profit made at the maximum­profit output. See diagram. 2(f) Draw new average and marginal revenue curves on the diagram to illustrate the long­run equilibrium that will occur after the entry of new firms into the industry. ..............See below. (g) What   is   the   relationship   between   the  AC,   MC,   AR  and  MR  curves   at   this   long­run equilibrium position? Explain. MC AC e c irPPL MR ARS S MRL ARL0 QL Quantity AC = AR, since the entry of new firms has eliminated supernormal profits. MC = MR, since profit is maximised at this output (at any other output, profit is less than normal). 3. Which of the following are characteristics of oligopoly?  (a) There are just a few firms that dominate the industry. .......................................................Yes (b) There are few if any barriers to the entry of new firms into the industry. ...........................No (c) The firms face downward sloping demand curves. ............................................................Yes (d) There is little point in advertising because there are so few firms. .....................................No (e) Oligopolists tend to take into account the actions and reactions of other firms. .................Yes 4. Assume that there are six firms in a country's carpet manufacturing industry and that they collude to restrict output, thereby maintaining a high price. Under which of the following circumstances is collusion likely to break down? (a) The government imposes higher duties on imported carpets...............................................No (b) Several new chains of discount carpet retailers enter the market........................................Yes (c) One of the firms develops a new cost saving technique of producing carpets....................Yes (d) Three of the smaller manufacturers merge..........................................................................No (e) One of the firms becomes dominant in the industry............................................................No (f) The demand for carpets falls..............................................................................................Yes (g) Legislation is passed preventing the exchange of information by producers on costs, sales and product development.................................................................................Yes 3 5. Which of the following are examples of tacit collusion? (a) Price leadership by a dominant firm..................................................................................Yes  (b) Agreements 'behind closed doors'.......................................................................................Yes (c) Discounts to retailers ..........................................................................................................No (d) Setting prices at a well known benchmark..........................................................................Yes (e) Increased product differentiation within the industry..........................................................No (f) Price leadership by a barometric firm...............................................................................Yes  6. The following diagrams illustrate an industry under oligopoly consisting of 10 equal­sized firms and a particular firm in that industry. Each of the firms produces an identical product.  (a) Assuming that the firms form a cartel, what price will the cartel choose if it wishes to maximise overall profits for the cartel?..............................................£25 (where MC = MR) (b) What total output must the cartel produce in order to maintain this price?......................100 (c) To what output will an individual firm be restricted if this price is to be maintained (assume all firms are permitted to produce the same level of output)?...............................10 (d) If the other firms stick to this output, how much would an individual firm be tempted to produce if it wished to maximise its own profit at the agreed price? 20 (where MC = price (= MR)) (e) If it undercut the cartel price, what price and output would maximise its profit (assuming that the other members did not retaliate?............................£23; 15 units (where MC = MR) 47. The table below shows the annual profits of two paint manufacturers. At present they both charge £5.00 per litre for gloss paint. Their annual profits are shown in Box A. The other boxes show the effects on their profits of one or the other, or both firms reducing their price to £3.50. Durashine’s price £5.00                                    £4.00 £5.00 Supasheen’s price £3.50 A £6 million each B £9 million for Supasheen £3 million for Durashine C £2 million for Supasheen £8 million for Durashine D £4 million each (a)  Which of the two prices should Durashine charge if it is pursuing (i) a maximax strategy?  ..............................................................................................£4.00 (ii) a maximin strategy?  ..............................................................................................£4.00 (b)  Which of the two prices should Supasheen charge if it is pursuing (i) a maximax strategy?  ..............................................................................................£4.00 (ii) a maximin strategy?  ..............................................................................................£4.00 (c)  Why is this known as a dominant strategy game? Because both maximax and maximin strategies lead to the same decision. (d)   Assume now that the ‘game’ between Supasheen and Durashine has been played for some time with the result that they both learn a ‘lesson’ from it.  What are they likely to do? Tacitly agree to stick to the hgiher price. Durashine now faces competition from firms other than Supasheen. It thus decides to consider some alternative strategies to adopt. It examines four options. The first is to a 10 per cent price cut. The second is to introduce a new brand of high gloss durable emulsion paint. The third is to launch a new marketing campaign. The fourth is to introduce no change other than increasing its prices in line with inflation. It estimates how much profit (in £m) each strategy (1–4) will bring depending on how its rivals react.  It considers the effects of six possible reactions (a–f). Other firms' responses a b c d e f Strategies 1 0 1 3 0 2 3 for2 –2 5 –2 3 4 6 3 –4 2 –1 0 1 8 Durashine 4 2 3 –1 4 3 7

(e) Which of the four policies should it adopt if it is pursuing: (i) A maximax strategy?.........3 (this gives change of maximum possible profit: response f) (ii) A maximin strategy?......1 (the worst that can happen is a zero profit: responses a & d) (b) Which of the four policies might be the best compromise?....................................................4 58. A firm operating under oligopoly is currently selling 4 units per day at a price of £40. By conducting extensive market research its chief economist estimates that, if it raises its price, its rivals will not follow suit and that, as a result, it will face an average revenue curve given by P = 50 – 5Q/2  (where P = AR) On the other hand, if it reduces its price, its rivals will be forced to reduce theirs too. Under these circumstances its average revenue curve will be given by P = 60 – 5Q  (where P = AR) (a) What will be the equation for the firm's demand curve if the firm raises its price? If P = 50 – 5Q/2, then solving for Q gives: Q = 20 – 2P/5 (b) What will be the equation for the firm's demand curve if the firm reduces its price? If P = 60 – 5Q, then solving for Q gives: Q = 12 – P/5 (c) How much will be demanded at the following prices? £50 .............................Q = 20 – 2×50/5 = 0 £45 ............................Q = 20 – 2×45/5 = 2 £40  .................Using either equation, Q = 4 £30 ................................Q = 12 – 30/5 = 6 £20  Q = 12 – 20/5 = 8 ...........................£10 Q = 12 – 10/5 = 10 AR = D MR(d) Plot the two demand curves on the above diagram, marking in bold the portion of each that is relevant to the firm..............................................................................................See diagram. (e) Plot two marginal revenue curves corresponding to each of the demand curves. (Remember that the MR curve lies midway between the AR curve and the vertical axis.) Mark in bold the portion of each MR curve that is relevant to the firm. ........................................See diagram. (f) Over what range of values can marginal cost vary without affecting the profit­maximising price of £40?..........................Between £0 and £30 (i.e. the vertical portion of the MR curve) 6 Answers to Workshop 9 Market Failures and 1. The following are problems that prevent markets from providing a socially optimal allocation of resources: (i) Externalities (ii) Monopoly/oligopoly power (iii) Ignorance and uncertainty (iv) Public goods and services (v) Merit goods Government InterventionMatch each of the above categories of problem to the following examples of failures of the free market.  In each case assume that everything has to be provided by private enterprise: that there is no government provision or intervention whatsoever.   Note that there may be more than one example of each category of problem.   Note also that each of the following cases may be an example of more than one category of problem. (a) There is an inadequate provision of street lighting because it is impossible for companies to charge all people benefiting from it. (iv) (b) Advertising allows firms to sell people goods that they do not really want.        (iii) (c) A firm tips toxic waste into a river because it can do so at no cost to itself.        (i) (d) People may not know what is in their best interests and thus may underconsume certain goods or services (such as education).        (v) (e) Firms’ marginal revenue is not equal to the price of the good and thus they do not equate MC and price.        (ii) (f) Firms provide an inadequate amount of training because they are afraid that other firms will simply come along and ‘poach’ the labour they have trained.        (i) 2. Give two examples of each of the following: (a) External costs of production.........................................Global warming; unsightly factories. (b) External benefits of production. Research and development benefits to others; forestry (benefits to atmosphere).  (c) External costs of consumption.......Litter; nuisance to others from mobile phones on trains. (c) External benefits of consumption Benefits to others from medicines curing infectious diseases; benefits to others from people painting the outside of their houses. 23. Assume that a firm produces organic waste that has the effect of increasing the fertility of neighbouring farmland and thus reducing the farmers’ costs.  It is impractical, however, to sell the waste to the farmers.  The following table shows the firm’s private marginal costs and these external benefits to farmers from the firm’s production. Output (units) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10    Price (£) 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 Marginal (private) costs (£) 16 15 15 16 17 18 20 22 24 27 Marginal external benefit (£) 6 5 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 1 Marginal social cost (£) 10 10 11 13 15 16 18 20 22 26 (a) Assuming no government intervention, how much will the firm produce to maximise profits?  ................7 units (where P (= MR) = MC (private)) (b) Fill in the column for marginal social cost...............................................................See table .  (c) What is the socially optimum level of output?..............................8 units  (where P = MSC) (d) What subsidy per unit would the government have to pay the firm to encourage it to produce this level of output?.....£2 (= marginal external benefit) (e) What would it cost the government?..................................................................£2 × 8 = £16 (f) If new farming technology doubled the benefit of the waste to the farmers, what will now be the socially optimum level of the firm’s output?....................................................9 units (where P = MSC = £20) 34. The   figure   opposite   shows   the   production   of   fertiliser   by   a   perfectly   competitive   profit maximising firm. Production of the good leads to pollution of the environment, however. This pollution is an external cost to the firm. (a) Which of the two curves, I or II, represents the marginal social cost curve? I                 .............................curve I MC ) £(b) What output will the firm produce (if   it   takes   no   account   of   the pollution?                 .....................................Q2 (c) What is the level of the marginal external cost at this output?.C2 – C3 (d) What is the socially efficient level of output? ...................................Q1 (e) Assume   that   the   government imposes   a   tax   on   the   pollution caused by the firm at a constant rate per unit of output. What must the size of the tax per unit be in order II C1 e unC2 ev e rd nDC3 as tso C4 C C5 Q1Q2 Q3 Quantity of fertiliser to persuade the firm to produce the socially efficient level of output?                                                                                                      .........................................C (f) Assuming that this firm is the only polluter in the industry, what effect will the tax have on the market price?                                                                                              ............................................ 5. Which of the following are examples of public goods (or services)?  (Note that we are not merely referring to goods or services that just happen to be provided by the public sector.) (a) Museums       ......................................................................................................................No (b) Cross­country rail services       ...........................................................................................No (c) Roads in town       ............Yes (unless an electronic road pricing scheme becomes practical) (d) Motorways       .............................................................................No (tolls could be charged) (e) National defence       ..........................................................................................................Yes (f) Health care       ...................................................................................................................No (g) The fire service       .............................................................................................................No (h) Community policing       ....................................................................................................Yes (i) Street drains       .................................................................................................................Yes (j) Local authority administration       .....................................................................................Yes (k) Secondary education       .....................................................................................................No 4 6. The following diagram shows an industry which was previously perfectly competitive but is now organised as a monopoly. Cost and revenue curves are assumed to be the same in both situations.    £ MC = MSC P3 P2 P1 1 2 3 4 67 5 8 10 12 9 11

AR = D  = MSB Q1 Q2 Q MR (a) What is the perfectly competitive price and output?......................................................P2, Q2 (b) What is the monopoly price and output?........................................................................P3, Q1 (c) What   areas   represent   consumers’   surplus   in   the   perfectly   competitive   situation? 1+2+3+4+5 (d) What areas represent consumers’ surplus after the industry has become a monopoly?.........................................................................................................................1+2 (e) What areas represent the loss in consumers’ surplus after the industry has become a monopoly?          ....................................................................................3+4+5 (f) What areas represent producers’ surplus in the perfectly competitive situation?....6+7+8+9 (g) What areas represent producer’s surplus after the industry has become a monopoly?............................................................................................................3+4+6+7+9 (h) What areas represent the gain in producer’s surplus after the industry has become a monopoly? .............................................................................................3+4–8 (i) What areas represent total deadweight welfare loss under monopoly? ............................5+8 5Answers to Workshop 10 The National Economy1. Position each of the following eight terms in the UK’s circular flow of income diagram below: Consumption (of domestically produced goods and services);    Net saving;    Net taxation; Government expenditure;    Factor payments (national income);    Expenditure on imports;    Investment;    Expenditure on exports. Economists use specific letters to label each of these terms.  The letters used are: S,   G,   X,   M,   I,   Cd,   T,   Y Attach the correct letter to each of the terms you have written on the diagram. Investment (I) Government Expenditure (G) Expenditure Factor payments (Y) Consumption of domestic goods and services (Cd) on Exports (X) Expenditure on Imports (M) Net taxation (T) Net saving (S) 2. Which of the following are changes in injections into, and which are changes in withdrawals from the UK’s circular flow of income?  In each case, identify whether the change is an increase or a decrease.  In each case, assume that this is the only change.  (Delete wrong words.) (a) A council funds the building of new libraries. .......................................Injection   Increase (b) The government raises tax­free thresholds. .......................................Withdrawal  Decrease (c) The government reduces child benefit. ..............................................Withdrawal   Increase (d) Fewer tourists visit the UK.....................................................................Injection   Decrease (e) Firms, anticipating a rise in consumer demand, borrow more money in order to build up their stocks. ........................................Injection   Increase (f) Consumers demand more goods that are domestically produced (but total consumption does not change). ..........................................Withdrawal  Decrease (g) People invest more money in banks and building societies. ..............Withdrawal   Increase 23. What will happen to the level of the UK’s national income if the following changes occur?  (In each case assume other things remain unchanged.) (a) Firms are encouraged by lower interest rates to build new factories. Rise (b) Consumers abroad are deterred by a high price for the pound from buying imports from the UK. Fall (c) Both taxation and government expenditure are reduced. Impossible to tell without more information You would need to know the respective sizes of the reduction in taxation (a reduction in withdrawals) and the reduction in government expenditure (a reduction in injections). (d) People decide to save a larger proportion of their income. Fall (e) Our trading partners abroad begin to recover from recession. Rise As they recover from recession, so consumer spending will increase. Part of the extra spending will go on UK exports (an injection into the UK's circular flow of income). 4. What would be the effect of each of the following events on actual and potential economic growth? (Assume no other changes take place.) (a) A reduction in the level of investment. Actual growth: fall Potential growth: fall (b) People save a larger proportion of their income.  Actual growth: fall Potential growth: rise (c) Increased expenditure on education and training.  Actual growth: rise Potential growth: rise (d) The discovery of new more efficient techniques which could benefit industry generally Actual growth: no effect Potential growth: rise (e) A reduction in interest rates.  Actual growth: rise Potential growth: rise (because of higher investment and hence increased production capacity in the economy) 3             5. Firm A sells some raw materials to firm B for £120. Firm B then processes them and sells them to firm C for £160. Firm C uses them to produce a finished good, which it sells to a wholesaler for £300, which then sells it to a retailer for £350, which then adds a £25 mark up. (a) Assuming no VAT in this country, use a value­added approach to calculate the total value of production. £120 + £40 + £140 + £50 + £25 = £375 (Note that this is the final value of the good.) (b) Assume now that the values given above include a 10% VAT at each stage. What is the  total value of production now (i.e. excluding VAT)? £340.91 (£375 includes 10% tax, based on the pre­tax figure. The pre­tax figure must therefore be £375/1.1 = £340.91) 6. One method of calculating GDP is to add up the values added in the production of all goods and services in the economy. When calculating GDP from gross value added (GVA) statistics, what should be done with the figures for the following? (a) Taxes on incomes.........................................................................................................ignore (b) Taxes on goods and services (e.g. VAT) ..........................................................................add (c) Subsidies on production............................................................................................subtract 7. Given the following data on UK expenditure in 2003: £bn Final consumption expenditure by households and non­profit institutions....................725.0 Government final consumption expenditure...................................................................231.8 Gross fixed capital formation.........................................................................................175.9 Changes in inventories......................................................................................................+4.2 Imports of goods and services........................................................................................313.2 Net income from abroad.................................................................................................+22.4 Exports of goods and services........................................................................................282.2 Fixed capital consumption (depreciation).......................................................................115.3 Calculate: (a) Gross domestic product (at market prices) £725.0bn + £231.8bn + £175.9bn + £4.2bn – £313.2bn + £282.2bn = £1105.9bn  (b) Net national income £1105.9bn +£22.3bn – £115.3bn = £1012.9bn  48. Which of the following should be included when measuring GDP by the income method? (a) Wages and salaries.............................................................................................................Yes (b) Tax income of the government...........................................................................................No (c) Profits of private companies .............................................................................................Yes (d) Profits of government­owned enterprises .........................................................................Yes (e) Amount spent on stocks and shares ...................................................................................No (f) Taxes on products ..................................................................Yes (to get from GVA to GDP) (g) Government pensions and allowances ...................No (these are merely transfer payments) (h) Rent on land ......................................................................................................................Yes 9. When calculating real GDP we must use the GDP deflator for that year. This allows us to adjust figures measured in current prices for the rate of inflation, and show them in terms of a base year. Assume that GDP in current prices grows from £120bn in year 1 to £160bn in year 2 and that the GDP deflator rises from 100 in year 1 to 130 in year 2, by how much has real GDP grown? 2.56% This is calculated as follows:  Real GDP = Nominal GDP/GDP deflator × 100. Thus in year 1, real GDP = £120bn/100 × 100 = £120bn and in year 2, real GDP = £160bn/130 × 100 = £123.07bn ∴ real GDP has grown by (123.07 – 120)/120 × 100 = 2.56% 10. Give three reasons why GDP may be poor indicator of society’s well­being. Three reasons are given in section 13.3 of the text:  (a) Production does not equal consumption. Production is desirable only to the extent that it enables us to consume more. If GDP rises as a result of a rise in investment, this will not lead to an increase in current living standards. It will, of course, help to raise future consumption. (b) The human costs of production. If production increases, this may be due to technological advance. If, however, it increases as a result of people having to work harder or longer hours, its net benefit will be less. Leisure is a desirable good, and so too are pleasant working conditions, but these items are not included in the GDP figures. (c) GDP ignores externalities. The rapid growth in industrial society is recorded in GDP statistics. What the statistics do not record are the environmental side effects: the polluted air and rivers, the ozone depletion, the problem of global warming. If these external costs were taken into account, the net benefits of industrial production might be much less. 5Answers to Workshop 4 1. The following table shows the total utility that Eleanor derives from visits to the cinema per week. Background to DemandVisits 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 TU (£) 12 20 25 28 30 31 31 29 MU(£) 12 8 5 3 2 1 0 –2 (a) Fill in the figures for marginal utility. (b) Draw a graph of the figures for total and marginal utility on the following diagram. 35 30 )TU £(y tilitul an igra25 20 15 m d n a l atoT 10 5 0 ­5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Weekly visits to the cinema MU (c) How many visits to the cinema will she make per week if the price of a ticket is:  (i)  £4.00......................................................................3 (beyond 3, price is greater than MU) (ii)  £2.50.....................................................................4 (beyond 4, price is greater than MU) 2. (Multiple choice) Total utility will fall whenever A. marginal utility is falling. B. marginal utility is rising. C. marginal utility has reached a maximum. D. marginal utility is zero. E. marginal utility is negative. 3. The following diagram shows the marginal utility (MU) that a consumer gets from consuming different quantities of a product. Assume that the current market price of the product is P. Marginal utility, Price (£) (1) P (2)

Q (3) MU Quantity purchased(a) Why is the optimum consumption point at Q? Because MU = P (consumer surplus is maximised) (b) What area(s) represent(s) total utility at Q?.........................1 + 2 (area under MU curve at Q) (c) What area(s) represent(s) the consumer’s total expenditure at Q?..........................2 (= P × Q) (d) What area(s) represent(s) the consumer’s total consumer surplus at Q? 1 (= total utility – total expenditure) 2              4. Sally, a first­year degree student, lives in lodgings and pays a fixed amount for food and accommodation. The money she has left over she spends on books and compact discs. Her preferences between various combinations of books and CDs are shown in the following table. She is indifferent between the combinations in each of the five sets shown, but has preferences between sets. Set 1 Books CDs 40 3 30 5 23 8 16 14 12 19 10 22 6 30 4 37 2 46

Set 2 Books CDs 33 7 22 14 16 20 13 25 7 37 4 45

Set 3 Books CDs 40 1 30 2 22 4 20 5 17 7 14 10 11 13 6 20 2 30 1 37 Set 4 Books CDs 27 6 20 10 11 20 5 33

Set 5 Books CDs 30 1 20 3 16 4 12 6 6 10 3 14 1 20

(a) Plot indifference curves on the following diagram corresponding to each of the five sets above. Set 2 Set 5 Set 3 Sets 1, 4(b) Which set would Sally like best?...........................................Set 1 / Set 2 / Set 3 / Set 4 / Set 5 (c) Between which two sets is Sally indifferent?........................Set 1 / Set 2 / Set 3 / Set 4 / Set 5 (d) Which set does Sally like the least? .....................................Set 1 / Set 2 / Set 3 / Set 4 / Set 5 3 (e) Given   the   information   in   the   table,   why   would   Sally   not   be   indifferent   between   the combinations in the following set: 36 books & 5 CDs. 23 books & 8 CDs, 12 books & 13 CDs, 3 books & 20 CDs? Because this ‘indifference curve’ would cross others (see below). Set 2 Set 5New set Set 3 Sets 1, 4(f) What is Sally’s marginal rate of substitution of books for CDs in set 5 for (i) the fourth CD?................................................................................................................4 (ii) the sixth CD?........................................................................................................4/2 = 2 (iii) the tenth CD?.....................................................................................................6/4 = 1.5 Now assume that Sally has £300 per year to spend on a combination of books and CDs, and assume that all the books and CDs she wants cost £10 each. (g) Draw in her budget line on the diagram on the previous page....................................See over 4 (h) What is the optimum amount of books and CDs for her to buy with this £300? 40 35 30 skoo b f or eb 25 20 15 m uN10 5 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Number of CDs 16 books,  14 CDs (i) Assume now that the price of CDs rises to £20.  Draw in her new budget line.  See below. (j) What is the optimum amount of books and CDs per year for her now to buy?  20 books,  5 CDs 5 5. Match each of the following changes (i) – (viii) in an indifference diagram to the causes (a) – (h) below of those changes. (In each case assume that nothing else changes and that units of X are measured on the horizontal axis and units of Y on the vertical axis.) (i) A parallel shift outwards of the budget line (ii) The budget line becomes steeper. (iii) The indifference curves become flatter. (iv) A parallel shift inwards of the budget line. (v) A movement along the budget line to a higher indifference curve. (vi) A pivoting outwards of the budget line round the point where the budget line crosses the X axis. (vii) The indifference curves become steeper. (viii) A movement along the budget line from an old tangency point to a new one. (a) An decrease in the price of Y.............................................................................................(vi) (b) A shift in tastes towards Y and away from X....................................................................(iii) (c) A rise in income....................................................................................................................(i) (d) A change in the optimum level of consumption resulting from a change in tastes..........(viii) (e) A shift in tastes towards X and away from Y....................................................................(vii) (f) An increase in utility resulting from a change in consumption...........................................(v) (g) A decrease in the relative price of Y...................................................................................(ii) (h) A fall in income..................................................................................................................(iv) 6Answers to Workshop 2 1. The following passage refers to the operation of a free­market economy. Delete the words (in italics) which are incorrect. Demand and SupplyIn a totally free­market economy, the quantities of each type of good that are bought and sold, and   the   amounts   of  factors   of  production   (labour,   land   and   capital)   that   are   used,  are determined by the decisions of individual households and firms through the interaction of demand and supply. In goods markets, households are  demanders  and firms are  suppliers.  In labour markets, households are suppliers and firms are demanders. Demand and supply are brought into balance by the effects of changes in price. If supply exceeds demand in any market (a surplus), the price will fall. This will lead to a rise in the quantity demanded but a fall in the quantity supplied. If, however, demand exceeds supply in any market (a shortage), the price will rise. This will lead to a fall in the quantity demanded and a rise in the quantity supplied. In either case, the adjustment of price will ensure that demand   and   supply   are   brought   into   equilibrium,   with   any   shortage   or   surplus   being eliminated. 2.  How will the market demand curve for a ‘normal’ good shift (i.e. left, right or no shift) in each of the following cases? (a) The price of a substitute good falls......................................................................................left (b) Population rises................................................................................................................right (c) Tastes shift away from the good..........................................................................................left (d) The price of a complementary good falls..........................................................................right (e) The good becomes more expensive.......................................no shift (movement along curve) 3. How will the market supply curve of a good shift (i.e.  left,  right  or  no shift) in each of the following cases? (a) Costs of producing the good fall.......................................................................................right (b) Alternative products (in supply) become more profitable....................................................left (c) The price of the good rises...........................................................................................no shift (d) Firms anticipate that the price of the good is about to fall.................................................right 4. How will the following changes affect the market price of wheat flour (assuming that the market is initially in equilibrium)?  In each case, sketch what happens to the demand and/or supply curves and, as result, what happens to the equilibrium price. (a)    People consume more bread. (b) The discovery of a new cheaper way of  milling flour.             (c) The prices of other grains rise.         (d) Rice and potatoes fall in price.           Price P2 P1 Q1 Price S2 Q2 S1 D1 S1 Quantity 2 Price P1 P2 Q1 PriceD2 Q1 S1 D1 S1 Quantity 5. The diagram below shows the demand for and supply of petrol. The market is initially in equilibrium at point x.  There is then a shift in the demand and/or supply curves, with a resulting change in equilibrium price and quantity.  To which equilibrium point (a, b, c, d, e, f, g or h) will the market move from point x after each of the following changes? S2 S0 e cirPg h f a b x d e Quantity c S1 D1 D2 D0 The market for petrol (a) A rise in the cost of refining petrol.........................................................................................h (b) A fall in bus and train fares.....................................................................................................f (c) A fall in the price of crude oil and an increase in the price of cars.........................................e (d) A rise in tax on petrol and a reduction in tax on cars..............................................................a 36.     The demand and supply schedules for wheat in a free market are as follows: Price per tonne (£) 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 Tonnes demanded per week 725 700 675 650 600 550 500 425 Tonnes supplied per week 225 300 400 500 600 750 1000 1300 (a) Draw the demand and supply curves on the following diagram: ) ennotr ep £ (e cirP400

S

D

360 320 280 240 200 160 120 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 1600 Quantity (tonnes per week) (a)  .................................................................................................What is the equilibrium price?  £280 per tonne (where D = S = 600 tonnes) (b)  Suppose the government fixes a maximum price of £200 per tonne.  What will be the effect? ........................................................................................Shortage of 275 tonnes (675 – 400) (c) Suppose that supply now increases by 150 tonnes at all prices. Enter the new figures. Price per tonne (£) 120 160 200 240 280 320 360 400 Tonnes demanded per week 725 700 675 650 600 550 500 425 (old) Tonnes supplied per week 225 300 400 500 600 750 1000 1300 (new) Tonnes supplied per week 375 450 550 650 750 900 1150 1450 (d) How much will price change from the original equilibrium (assuming that the government no longer fixes a maximum price)?  How much more will be sold? Change in price ........................................................................................Fall by £40 to £240 Change in quantity ......Rise by 50 from 600 to 650 (i.e. less than the 150 increase in supply) 4Answers to Workshop 8 Wages and the 1. The assumptions of perfect labour markets are similar to those of perfect goods markets.  There are four main assumptions.  What are they? Distribution of Income1. Everyone is a wage taker 2. Freedom of entry to the labour market 3. Perfect knowledge of the labour market 4. Homogeneous labour (of any given type) 2. The diagrams below show a local market for plasterers.  It is assumed that it is a perfect market.  (a) Delete the wrong words (in italics) in the following passage: The assumption of perfect competition means that  the wage rate of plasterers cannot be affected by individual  employers or workers.   This means  the supply of labour to an individual employer is perfectly elastic, and that the demand for labour for an individual worker is perfectly elastic too. e tare g a w y lruo H Wm Wm D individual           employer Smarket Dmarket Wm Sindividual worker Q1Q2 O Labour hours (a) Individual O Labour hours O Labour hours employer(b) Whole  market(c) Individual worker (b) In diagram (b), which of the two curves would shift and in which direction as a result of each of the following changes? There may be no shift in either curve. If so, delete all options. (i) A deterioration in the working conditions for plasterers................................supply left (ii) A decrease in the price of plaster. ............................................................demand right (iii) A decrease in the demand for new houses.  ................................................demand left (iv) An increased demand for plasterers in other parts of the country...................supply left (v) Increased wages in other parts of the building trade (as a result of union activity). demand left and supply left (vi) Increased costs associated with employing plasterers (e.g. employers having to pay higher insurance premiums for accidents to plasterers). .............................demand left (vii) A reduction in the wage rate of plasterers. ............Movement down along both curves 3. The following table shows how a firm’s output of a good increases as it employs more workers. It is   assumed   that   all   other   factors   of   production   are   fixed.   The   firm   operates   under   perfect competition in both the goods and labour markets.  The market price of the good is £2. Number of workers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total physical product (units) 100 220 340 440 520 580 620 650 Marginal physical product (units) 100 120 120 100   80   60   40   30 Marginal revenue product (£) 200 240 240 200 160 120   80   60 . (a) Fill in the missing figures in the above table (enter the figure for  MPP  and  MRP  in the spaces between the rows)...........................................................................................See table (b) How many workers will the firm employ (to maximise profits), if the wage rate were:   (i) £100 per week?..............................................................................................................6  (ii) £220 per week?..............................................................................................................3 (iii) £200 per week?.......................................................................................................3 or 4 (c) The demand curve for labour under perfect competition is given by the  MRP  (of labour) curve.            ..............................................................................................................................True (d) Will a change in each of the following lead to a shift in or a movement along the demand curve for labour?   (i) A change in the productivity of labour (MPP). ........................................................shift (ii) A change in the wage rate (W). .............................................................movement along (iii) A change in the price of the good (= MR). ...............................................................shift 24. The following diagram shows a monopsony employer of labour.  The vertical axis shows costs and revenue per hour.  Assume that there is no trade union and initially that there is no minimum £6.00 £5.80 £5.60 £5.40 £5.20 £5.00 £4.80 £4.60 £4.40 £4.20 £4.00 £3.80 £3.60 £3.40 £3.20 £3.00 £2.80 £2.60 £2.40 £2.20 £2.00

MCL

MC

ACL

MRP

L

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Number of workershourly wage rate. (a) How many workers will the monopsonist employ if it wishes to maximise profit?................4 (b) What hourly wage rate will the monopsonist pay?..........................................................£3.00 (c) Assuming instead that this is an industry under perfect competition, and that the horizontal axis is now measured in thousands, how many workers would be employed? 6000 (where the wage rate (ACL) = MRPL)  (d) What would be the hourly wage rate now?......................................................................£3.40 (e) Returning to the monopsonist, with the horizontal axis once more measured in individual workers, assume that the government imposes a minimum hourly wage rate.  What will be the average and marginal costs of labour at each of the following minimum wage rates?  (i)  £2.80                      ACL . . . . . . . . £3.00        MCL . . . . . . . . . £3.80 (ii)  £4.00 ACL . . . . . . . . £4.00        MCL . . . . . . . . . £4.00 (f) How many workers would be employed  by the monopsonist at each  of the following minimum wage rates?  (i)  £3.00  . . . . 4         (ii)  £3.40  . . . . 6         (iii)  £3.80  . . . . 4         (iv)  £4.20  . . . . .2 3 5. The extent to which a union will be able to secure higher wages from an employer will depend on its bargaining power. Will the following tend to increase or decrease a union’s bargaining power? (a) New figures showing that the firm’s profits for the last year were less than anticipated.      Decrease the union’s power. (b) A rise in unemployment. .............................................................Decrease the union’s power. (c) New figures showing that inflation has risen. ..............................Increase the union’s power. (d) A successful recruiting drive for union membership. ...................Increase the union’s power. (e) Increased competition for the firm’s product from imports.  Decrease the union’s power. (f) A rapidly growing demand for the firm’s product. ......................Increase the union’s power. (g) A closed­shop agreement. ............................................................Increase the union’s power. (h) The firm gains substantial monopoly power in the goods market. Increase the union’s power. 6. The following table shows the sources of UK household income by quintile groups. (Note that not all rows add to exactly 100 because of rounding errors.) Sources of UK household income as a percentage of total household income by quintile groups: 2003/4 Gross household  weekly incomes  (quintiles) Lowest 20% Next 20% Middle 20% Next 20% Highest 20% All households Wages and salaries (1)   7 30 59 76 79 67 Income from self­employment (2) 2 4 6 7 12 9 Income from investments (3) 3 4 3 2 3 3 Pensions and annuities (4)   8 17 12   7   3   7 Social security benefits (5) 77 44 17   7   2 13 Other (6) 2 2 2 1 1 1 Total (7) 100 100 100 100 100 100 (a) How would you explain the relatively high figures in columns (3) and (4) for the second poorest quintile? Because this group contains a high proportion of pensioners, who receive most of their income from investments, pensions and annuities. (b) What do the figures suggest are the major sources of inequality in incomes? Differences in wages and salaries, given that these provide the largest source of income. Income from self­employment is another important source of inequality, given that the highest 20 per cent receive 12 per cent from this source – considerably more than other income groups. 4Answers to Workshop 11 Unemployment and Inflation1. Given the following possible types of unemployment  −  demand­deficient, real­wage (wage push), frictional, structural, regional, technological and seasonal − which one is likely to worsen in each of the following cases? (There may be more than one case of a particular type.) (a) The introduction of robots in manufacturing...................................................Technological (b) The economy moves into recession...........................................Demand­deficient (cyclical) (c) Legislation is passed guaranteeing everyone a minimum wage that is 80% of the national average.            .....................................................................................................................Real­wage (d) The government decides to close job centres in an attempt to save money.            ..............................................................................Frictional (and demand­deficient) (e) The Bank of England raises interest rates. ................................................Demand­deficient 2. The following table shows the UK labour market in the period April to June 2002.  Fill in the blank parts of the table. Thousands

Male Female Total In employment 15,403 13,163 28,566 Unemployed (ILO method of calculation)      838      589   1,427 Total economically active 16,241 13,752 29,993 Percentage unemployed 5.2 4.3 4.8

23. The following diagram shows the aggregate demand and supply of labour and the total labour force (N). Assume initially that there is no disequilibrium unemployment. Assume that there is a contraction of aggregate demand and that, as a result, there is a recession. Assume also that wage rates are ‘sticky’ downwards and as a result do not fall. ASLN e tare g a w l ae R A B

ADL1 ADL2 O C D E F GNumber of workers (a) What is the initial level of employment?..............................................OE, where ADL1 = ASL (b) What is the initial level of unemployment? EG (the total labour force (N) minus the number unemployed. (This is purely equilibrium unemployment.) (c) What is the level of employment after the onset of recession? OC (the number of workers demanded at the wage rate of OA) (d) What is the total level of unemployment now?...................................................................CG (e) How much is equilibrium unemployment?.........................................................................EG (f) How much is disequilibrium unemployment?.....................................................................CE (g) Assume now that wage rates are not sticky downwards and fall to the equilibrium. How  much is unemployment now? DF (the difference between ASL and N at the new equilibrium wage rate of OB) 3 4. The following diagram shows an aggregate demand curve and an aggregate supply curve. AS l ev e le c irPAD National output (GDP) (a) Label the two axes.............................................................................................See diagram. (b) Give three reasons why the AD curve is downward sloping. 1. As the (domestic) price level rises, people will buy more imports and demand fewer domestic goods. 2. As the price level rises, people will need more money to pay for goods. The extra demand for money will drive up interest rates and dampen demand. 3. As the price level rises, the value of people’s savings will be eroded. They may  therefore save more (and hence demand fewer goods) to help restore the value of  their savings. (c) Why is the AS curve upward sloping (at least in the short run)? Higher prices will encourage firms to produce more (assuming that factor prices do not rise as rapidly as the prices of goods and services). (d) Give two things that could shift the AD curve to the right. 1. Increased government spending. 2. Increased investment (e.g. if firms anticipate a growth in their markets). (e) Give two things that could shift the AS curve to the right. 1. A rise in labour productivity. 2. An increase in the stock of capital. 45. The following table shows the  consumer prices index (CPI) for the UK, where 1996 = 100.0. Calculate the rate of inflation for the eight years 1991–4 and 2001–4.  The formula is: Inflation = ((Pt − Pt−1) / Pt−1) × 100 where t is the year in question and t−1 is the previous year. Give your answer to one decimal place. (The figures for 1990 and 2002 are given and are based on indices of 75.8 for 1989 and 104.8 for 1999) Year 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Price index (P) 81.1 87.2 90.9 93.2 95.1 105. 6 106. 9 108. 3 109. 8 111.2 Rate of inflation 7.0 7.5 4.2 2.5 2.0 0.8 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.3

6. Will the following lead to cost­push or demand­pull inflation, or both? (a) The Bank of England cuts interest rates and the economy booms. Demand­pull (b) As a result of falling unemployment, trade unions become more militant and demand higher wages. Both (c) The government raises the rate of VAT.  Cost­push (d) The government cuts income tax rates and raises government expenditure at a time of near full employment.  Demand­pull (e) Increasing industrial concentration leads to more oligopolistic collusion to raise prices. Cost­push 57. The following table gives the aggregate demand and aggregate supply schedules in February  2007 for a particular country. (Ignore the AD2 and AS2 columns until question (d) below and  AD3 until question (h).) Price level Aggregate demand (£ billions) AD2 AD3 Aggregate supply (£ billions) AS2   95 1000 1070 1120   950   970 100 970 1040 1090   970   990 105 950 1020 1070 1000 1020 110 930 1000 1050 1030 1050 115 915   985 1035 1060 1080 120 900    970 1020 1100 1120 (a) Draw the aggregate demand and aggregate supply curves on the following diagram, labelling  them AD1 and AS1. 125 . lev e le c irP120 115 110 105 100 95 90 AD1 AS1 AS2 AD2AD3900 920 940 960 980 1000 1020 1040 1060 1080 1100 1120 National income (£ billions) 6 (b) What is the equilibrium level of national income?............................................................£970bn (c) What is the equilibrium price level?.........................................................................................100 Assume that over the next 12 months aggregate demand rises by £70 billion at all price levels  and that aggregate supply rises by £20 billion at all price levels. (d) Enter the new figures for aggregate demand and aggregate supply on the table in the columns  AD2 and AS2......................................................................................................................See table (e) Draw the new aggregate demand and supply curves on the diagram, labelling them AD2 and  AS2..............................................................................................................................See diagram (f) What is the new equilibrium level of national income in February 2008?......................£1020bn (g) What is the rate of inflation in February 2005?.........5% (Price index goes up from 100 to 105) Assume that over the following 12 months aggregate demand rises by a further £50 billion at all  price levels but that there is no increase in aggregate supply beyond AS2. (h) Enter the new figures for aggregate demand on the table in the column AD3.................See table (i) Draw the new aggregate demand curve on the diagram, labelling it AD3..................See diagram (j) What is the new equilibrium level of national income in February 2008?......................£1050bn (k) What is the annual rate of inflation in February 2008 (clue: use the formula in question 5 of  this workshop)? Given that the price index has risen from 105 to 110, and using the formula ((Pt – Pt–1) / Pt–1) × 100 (where P is the price index, t is the year in  question and t–1 is the previous year), the rate of inflation is (110 – 105) / 105) × 100 = ....................................................................4.76% 7Answers to Workshop 12 Short­run Macroeconomic 1. (a) If a household earns £200 a week and spends £150 each week on domestically produced goods and services, how much does it withdraw from the circular flow? Equilibrium..............................................................................................£50 (b) What forms will these withdrawals take?..................Saving, taxes, expenditure on imports (c) Assume that total household incomes rise from £500bn to £550bn.   Assume that this results   in   the   consumption   of   domestically   produced   goods   and   services   rising   from £450bn to £490bn.  What is the mpcd? .........................................ΔCd / ΔY = £40bn/£50bn = 4/5 or 0.8 (d) Assuming   that   the  mpcd  remains   constant,   what   will   the   level   of   consumption   of domestically produced goods and services be if national income now rises to £700bn? If national income rises from £550bn to £700bn, a rise of £150bn, then Cd must rise by 4/5 of this (= £120bn) from £490bn to £610bn. (e) If total UK consumption of domestically produced goods and services is £490bn and injections into the circular flow of income are £80bn, what will be the level of aggregate expenditure (E)? ........................................................£490bn + £80bn = £570bn (f) Given your answer to (e), and assuming that total household incomes are currently £550bn, what will happen to household income? ........................................................................Rise  (g) What is the formula for the marginal propensity to withdraw?......................................ΔW/ΔY (h) What are the answers to the following? (Use a number or another term as appropriate.) (i) Y – W = Cd (ii) mpcd + mpw = 1 (iii) 1–mpcd = mpw 22. (a) Assuming that injections are constant at all levels of national income at £20 billion, complete the following table. Income (Y)  (£bn) 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 Consumption (Cd) (£bn) 40 70 100 130 160 190 220 Injections (J) (£bn) 20 20   20   20   20   20   20 Withdrawals (W) (£bn)   0 10   20   30   40   50   60 Aggregate expenditure (E) (£bn) 60 90 120 150 180 210 240

(b) Calculate the marginal propensity to consume domestically produced goods (mpcd). ΔCd / ΔY = £30bn / £40bn = ¾ or 0.75 (c) On the diagram below, label the line shown and then plot Cd , J  and aggregate expenditure (E) against national income (Y). Cd, J, W (£bn) 280 240 200 160 120 80 40 0

Y E Cd W J 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 National income (Y) (£bn) (d) What will be the equilibrium level of income (where E = Y)?....................................£120bn (f) What are withdrawals and injections at this level of income?     W …. £20bn      J ....£20bn (g) Plot the withdrawals line on the diagram...........................................................See diagram. You should now be able to see that there are two ways of finding the equilibrium level of national income. 33. In a closed economy (i.e. one that does not engage in foreign trade), spending on consumer goods is related to national income by the following schedule: Y  (£bn)   0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Cd (£bn)   4 20 36 52 68   84 100 116 132 148 J (£bn) 20 20 20 20 20   20   20   20   20   20 E (£bn) 24 40 56 72 88 104 120 136 152 168

If firms are investing at a rate of £8n per year and the government is spending £12n per year: (a) Fill in the figures in the table for total injections (J) and aggregate expenditure (E). (b) What is the equilibrium level of national income?.....................................................£120bn (c) What is the mpcd?.......................................................................................................4/5 or 0.8 (d) What is the value of the expenditure multiplier?..................................................................5 (e) Suppose that full employment yields a national income of £140bn per annum, by how much must government expenditure be changed to reach full­employment income? Raised by £4bn (with a multiplier of 5, this will lead to the required rise in national income of £20bn) (f) Does the initial equilibrium situation represent an inflationary or a deflationary gap, and what is the size of this gap? ..............................................................Deflationary gap. The size of the gap is £4bn. (g) Now assume that the government wishes to close this gap by changing taxes. By how much must taxes be initially raised or lowered. Explain your answer. Taxes must be lowered   by £5bn. The reason is that one fifth of any tax cut will be withdrawn into saving, additional taxes and expenditure on imports (mpw = 1/5). Thus only 4/5 of the tax cut (= £4bn) will result in extra consumption of domestically produced goods and services. This will then lead to a multiplied raise in national income of £20bn. 44. Examine the following diagram: Cd, W, J k h l s u m n t v Y (= Cd + W) E Cd g p q r

O a b d f YIdentify the correct letters for each of the  following (circle the correct answer): (a) Equilibrium national income .........................................(i) Oa     (ii) Ob     (iii) Od    (iv) Of (b) Injections at income Oa.................................................(i) aq    (ii) ah    (iii) hq    (iv) qa−hq (c) Withdrawals at income Of....................................................(i) tf   (ii) nt    (iii) mt    (iv) mn (d) mpcd .....................................................................(i) ur/su    (ii) su/ur    (iii) mt/tl    (iv) tr/tv (e) The amount that withdrawals rise when national income rises from Od to Of (i) tn    (ii) nm    (iii) tm    (iv) ln    (v) lm (f) mpw......................................................................(i) tn/df  (ii) nm/df   (iii) df/tn    (iv) df/nm (g) The multiplier....................................................(i) tn/df    (ii) nm/df    (iii) df/tn   (iv) df/nm 5 Answers to Workshop 13 Money and Interest Rates1. Which of the following are wholesale and which are retail? (a) Large­scale deposits made by firms at negotiated rates of interest. ..........................wholesale (b) Loans made by high street banks at published rates of interest. .......................................retail (c) Deposits in savings accounts in high street banks. ..........................................................retail (d) Deposits in savings accounts in building societies ..........................................................retail (e) Large­scale loans to industry syndicated through several banks. ..............................wholesale 2. Rank the following assets of a commercial banks in order of decreasing liquidity. (a) Money at call and short notice (b) Operational balances with the Bank of England (c) Cash (d) Personal loans (e) Sale and repurchase agreements (repos) (f) Mortgages (g) Government bonds (of from one to five years to maturity) High liquidity Cash Operational balances with the Bank of England Money at call and short notice Sale and repurchase agreements (repos) Government bonds (of from one to five years to maturity) Personal loans Mortgages Low liquidity 23. Consider the items in the following table, selected from a Bank A’s balance sheet. A range of sterling assets and liabilities of Bank A £m Notes and coin 2 Sight deposits in Bank A 100 Time deposits in Bank A 110 Investments in the public sector  30 Certificates of deposit in Bank A 40 Advances to UK private sector 170 Bills of exchange 20 Loans from other financial institutions 30 Operational balances with the Banks of England 1 Sale and repurchase agreements with Bank of England (repos) 20 Market loans (to other financial institutions) 77 (a) Use these figures to compile a balance sheet of Bank A. Arrange the assets in descending order  of liquidity. LIABILITIES £bn ASSETS  £bn Sight deposits Time deposits Certificates of deposit in Bank A Repos Loans from other financial  institutions 100 110 40 20 30 Notes and coin Operational deposits with B of E Market loans Bill of Exchange Investments Advances 2 1 77 20 30 170 Total 300 Total 300

(b) What is the cash ratio?.........................................................................3/300 = 1/100 or 0.01 or 1% (c) What is the total of liquid assets............................................................................................£100bn (d) What is the liquidity ratio?................................................................100/300 = 1/3 or 0.33 or 33% 34. Assuming that banks choose to maintain a liquidity ratio of 20 per cent and assuming that new cash deposits of £100m are made in the banking system: (a) Complete the following table which shows how credit is created. £m £m Banks receive 100 Hold 20 Lend 80 Second round  80 Hold 16 deposits rise by Lend 64 Third round  64 Hold 12.8 deposits rise by Lend 51.2 Fourth round  51.2 Hold 10.24 deposits rise by Lend 40.96 Fifth round  40.96 Hold  8.19 deposits rise by Lend 32.77 Total deposits after 336.16five rounds

(b) How much credit will have been created after five rounds?............£336.16 – £100 = £236.16 (c) To what level will total deposits eventually increase?.......................................................£500 (d) Define the bank multiplier The number of times greater the expansion of bank deposits is than the additional liquidity  in banks that caused it: 1/L (the inverse of the liquidity ratio) (e) What is the bank multiplier in this case?.................................................................................5 (f) How is it related to the liquidity ratio?.....................The inverse. Here the liquidity ratio is 1/5 45. (a) If banks operate a 25 per cent liquidity ratio, by how much will credit expand if new deposits of £100 million are made  by the customers of  banks..........................................£300 million                                                                                   (b) Show the combined balance sheet (of additional liabilities and assets) for all banks (i) at the beginning, and  (ii) at the end of this process. (i) Initial effect                  LIABILITIES                   £m                         ASSETS                      £m Initial new deposits 100 Initial additional liquid assets 20 Initial additional credit  80 Total initial new liabilities 100 .….                   Total  initial new assets 100

(ii) Eventual effect                  LIABILITIES                   £m                         ASSETS                      £m Eventual  new deposits 400 Eventual additional liquid assets 100 Eventual additional credit  300 Total eventual additional liabilities 400 .….                   Total eventual additional assets 400

6. Which of the following will cause the UK money supply to rise; which will cause it to fall; and  which will cause no direct change? (a) A balance of payments surplus (under a fixed rate of exchange) Rise (b) The government finances the public­sector net cash requirement (PSNCR) by selling securities  to the Bank of England.  Rise (c) The government decides to increase the proportion of the national debt financed by bonds  rather than by Treasury bills. Fall (d) The government finances the PSNCR by selling bonds and bills to the general public and non bank private sector.  No change (e) The government finances the PSNCR by selling Treasury bills to the banking sector.  Rise (f) The  Bank of England imposes a statutory liquidity ratio on banks higher than their current  ratio.  Fall (g) With the increased use of debit and credit cards, the general public decides to hold less cash as  a proportion of income.  Rise 5Answers to Workshop 14 The Relationship between the Money and Goods Markets1. M ..........................................................................................................................Money supply V ..........................................................................The velocity of circulation of money supply P ....................................................The price index, where the index in the base year is 1.00 Y ........................The real value of national income: i.e. GDP measured in base­year prices 2. In an economy whose GDP in current prices is £24 billion, the money supply is £8 billion. (a) What will be the velocity of circulation?..................................V = PY/M = £24bn/£8bn = 3 (b) If real GDP is £12 billion, what is the price level..............P = PY/Y = £24bn/£12bn = 2.00 (c) Suppose the velocity of circulation stays constant and the government decides to increase the money supply to £10 billion, what will happen to the price level if real GDP does not increase? .............................................................................P = MV/Y = £30bn/£12bn = 2.50 3. (a) Changes in V are small and predictable, hence any increase in the money supply M will have a significant effect upon total spending. ........................................................Monetarist view (b) M and V vary inversely. .................................................................................Keynesian view (c) V is determined by peoples’ desire to hold money balances, which in turn is determined by  expectations....................................................................................................Keynesian view (d) V is exogenously (independently) determined................................................Monetarist view (e) If MV falls as a result of a tight monetary policy, then Y  will fall as well as P.                         Keynesian view (f) In the long run Y is determined independently of the level of aggregate demand, such that any rise in MV will ultimately simply lead to a rise in prices. Monetarist view 4. An increase in the money supply will affect the level of economic activity in the country through a sequence of events.  In each of the following, delete the wrong words. 1. The rise in the money supply will lead to a fall in the rate of interest. 2(a) The fall in the rate of interest will lead to a rise in investment and other forms of borrowing. 2(b) The fall in the rate of interest will lead to a fall in the rate of exchange. 3. The fall in the exchange  rate will lead to a rise in exports and a fall in imports. 4. The rise in investment and the rise in exports and fall in imports will lead to a multiplied rise in national income and a possible rise in prices. 25. The   following   diagrams   illustrate   the   relationship   between   money,   interest   rates   and   the equilibrium level of GDP. Diagram (i) shows how the demand and supply of money determine the rate of interest; diagram (ii) shows how the rate of interest determines the level of investment; diagram (iii) is the simple Keynesian model showing how   national income (Y) is determined (note that investment is a component of aggregate expenditure). Assume that there is an increase in the supply of money. (a) Illustrate on diagram (i) the effect on interest rates of the increase in the money supply. t s e r e t n i f MS1 MS2 t s e r (i) (ii) e t n if r1r1 o o r2r2 e t a R L e t a R I O O I2 I1 Money Investment E and its components Y E1 E1 x z (iii) ONational income (Y) Y1 Y2Interest rate falls to r2 (b) Illustrate on diagram (ii) the effect on investment of the change in interest rates you have illustrated on diagram (i).........................................................................Investment rises to I2 (c) Illustrate on diagram (iii) the effect on national income of the change in investment you have illustrated on diagram (ii)..............................................................National income rises to Y2 (d) The effect of a change in money supply on Y will be greater: (delete wrong words).   (i) the steeper is the liquidity preference curve (L) in diagram (i).  (ii) the shallower is the investment demand curve (I) in diagram (ii). (iii) the larger is the marginal propensity to consume (mpc) in diagram (iii). (e) Given your answers to (d), why might the precise relationship between  M  and  P  in the quantity equation MV = PY be difficult to predict? Because the shapes of the curves in all three diagrams are difficult to predict with accuracy 3 4. The following pair of diagrams depict a simplified Keynesian model, where investment is the only injection and saving is the only withdrawal. The top diagram shows that equilibrium national income is at Y1, where investment equals saving (i.e. injections equal withdrawals). The bottom diagram depicts the relationship between national income and interest rates. This relationship can be derived from the top diagram. It is assumed that interest rates will affect investment and, to a lesser extent, saving. It is assumed that with an interest rate of r1 investment and saving will be as shown in the top diagram and that, therefore, national income will be at Y1. Point a represents this relationship between the rate of interest and national income. s law a rdhtiW, snoitce jnIO

S1 S2 I2 I1 t se retnif oe taR r1 r2 O Y1 

Y1 a Y2 b IS Y2(a) Now assume that the rate of interest rate falls to  r2. Draw new  I and  S  curves in the top diagram to illustrate the effect of a lower interest rate. Mark the new equilibrium national income, Y2................................................................................................................See above (b) In the bottom diagram draw a point b corresponding to r2 and Y2. ..........................See above (c) Connect the point a and b in the bottom diagram. This gives an ‘IS’ curve. ...........See above (d) What would happen to the shape of the IS curve if both investment and saving became more  responsive to changes in interest rates?  The IS curve would become flatter (there would be  a bigger change in Y for any given change in r) 5. What effect will the following have on the IS curve? (Assume that other things remain  constant.) (a) Business expectations of the future improve..........................................................Shift right (b) The economy experiences a consumer boom. .......................................................Shift right (c) The Bank of England raises the rate of interest. .......................................................No shift (d) Firms anticipate an oncoming recession. .................................................................Shift left (e) The government raises taxes. ..................................................................................Shift left 4
Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here