Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

UAB - BY 124 - BY 124 UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

Created by: Tarana Elite Notetaker

> > > > UAB - BY 124 - BY 124 UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

UAB - BY 124 - BY 124 UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE - Study Guide

School: University of Alabama at Birmingham
Department: Biology
Course: Intro to Biology 124
Professor: Cusic
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: plants, vascular, nonvascular, Biology, Soil, roots, Stems, leaves, Gynmosperms, angiosperms, Seeds, spores, lifecycle, Trees, flowers, Monocots, Dicots, xylem, phloem, cells, and plantcells
Name: BY 124 UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE
Description: This study guide covers Chapters 29, 30, 35, 36. Chapters 37 & 39 will also be on the exam. This can be a useful tool for a quick self assessment on most of this unit.
Uploaded: 01/29/2017
0 5 3 4 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 5 of a 25 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Chapter 29: Plant Diversity I ­ How Plants Colonized Land  Tarana Sidhu 
BY 124 w/ Dr. Cusic  
1) What are the four things land plants and charophytes have in common? Phragmoplast Formation 
Flagellated Sperm Structure 
Sporopollenin 
Rings of cellulose making proteins
2) What are the five traits that land plants have and charophytes don’t? Alternation of Generations 
Apical Meristems
Embryos
Multicellular Gametangia 
Walled Spores Produced in Sporangia  3) Explain the alternation of generations (and review picture from the textbook!) The life cycle has stages between multicellular sporophytes and gametophytes. In the beginning, the gametophyte produces haploid gametes. Two haploid gametes (from a male and female) come together and are  fertilized, creating a diploid zygote.  This diploid zygote becomes a multicellular sporophyte.  The mature sporophyte produces haploid spores through meiosis.  These haploid spores become haploid gametophytes and the cycle  repeats.  4) What are two traits that land plants have derived? Explain their function. Cuticle ­ waxy covering that prevents excessive water loss from aboveground  plant organs
Stomata ­ pores in cells that regulate gas exchange between air and plant. This 
is where water evaporate from. Also minimizes water loss by closing in hot & dry 
conditions 
5) List the sequence in which plants evolved as well as how many years ago each event occurred.  Origin of the  land plant ­ 470 MYA Origin of  vascular plants ­ 425 MYA Origin of  seeds ­ 305 MYA Origin of  flowers ­ 160 MYA 6) What is a vascular system? 
background image Where cells joined into tubes transport water and nutrients throughout the plant  body 7) What are vascular plants commonly referred to? Tracheophytes 8) Name the two main divisions of vascular plants Seedless vascular plants vs. seeded vascular plants  9) What are the two phyla under seedless vascular plants (and their common names)? Phylum Lycophyta (lycophytes)
Phylum Monilophyta (monilophytes)
10) What are the two types of seeded vascular plants? Gymnosperms & Angiosperms  11) What are the 4 phyla under Gymnosperms (and their common names)? Phylum Gnetophyta (gnetophytes) Phylum Cycadophyta (cycads)
Phylum Coniferophyta (conifers)
Phylum Ginkgophyta (ginkgo) 12) What is the single phylum under Angiosperms (and its common name)? Phylum Anthophyta (flowering plants) 13) What are nonvascular plants commonly referred to? Bryophytes 14) Nonvascular plants have no divided groups, consisting only of 3 phyla. What are 
they and what are their common names?
Phylum Anthocerophyta (hornworts) 
Phylum Hepatophyta (liverworts)
Phylum Bryophyta (mosses) 15) Distinguish vascular plants from nonvascular plants.  Vascular plants have true stems, roots, and leaves while nonvascular plants  don’t.
Vascular plants have diploid sporophytes as their dominant generation. 
Nonvascular plants have haploid gametophytes as their dominant generation 16) What is the dominant generation of the moss life cycle? Haploid gametophytes because mosses are nonvascular.  17) Explain the process of the moss life cycle. (and review picture from the textbook!)
background image Haploid spores are released from the capsule Spore develops into a haploid protonemata which produces buds Buds on protonemata divide by mitosis and grow into male and female  gametophytes  Antheridia on haploid male gametophyte releases sperm which swims through  moisture Sperm reaches the egg inside the archegonia of the haploid female gametophyte FERTILIZATION*** inside archegonia Diploid zygote sporophyte embryo is created Sporophyte grows inside archegonia attached by its foot as a seta (stalk) and 
becomes 
nutritionally dependent on its haploid gametophyte mother MEIOSIS*** inside capsule (sporangium) at the head of the sporophyte   Mature capsule releases haploid spores created inside  These spores develop into protonemata.  CYCLE REPEATS ­ Bryophyte sporophyte remains attached to gametophyte 
mother for its entire lifespan. 
18) What is a peristome? Tooth­like structures found on the sporangium capsule at the sporophyte head.  It opens under dry conditions and closes under moist conditions. 
The spores are released from here slowly to ensure some of them are passed 
on/survive. 19) What is peat moss? Made of moss remains, found in peatlands  These peatlands do not have oxygen, have a low pH and temperature that inhibit decay 20) What are baby liverworts called? Gammae  21) What are nonvascular hornworts more closely related to? Vascular Plants  22) What were the first vascular plants like? Seedless, became taller with support
Include monilophytes and lycophytes
23) Explain the process of the fern life cycle. (and review picture from the textbook!) Haploid spores are released from sporangia of sporophyte  Spores develop into bisexual gametophytes known as rhizoids 
background image These rhizoids produce sperm in antheridia and eggs in archegonia at different  times This is done so egg is fertilized by sperm of another gametophyte and to ensure  genetic diversity Sperm is directed by archegonia secretions to its eggs where fertilization occurs  Diploid zygote develops in archegonia and develops into sporophyte Sporophyte grows out from parent archegonia  Mature sporophyte contains sori spots on the underside of its leaves, which 
contain ­ clusters of sporangia
Meiosis occurs in the sporangia of the sori Haploid spores are released from the sporangia 24) What are the two types of vascular tissue found in vascular plants? Xylem ­ conducts water and minerals
Phloem ­ this tissue arranges cells into tubes, distributing sugars, amino acids, 
and organic products  25) Name six factors why lignified vascular tissue is important. Ensure vascular tissue grows tall  Stems are strong enough to support against gravity Allows high water and nutrient transport  Tall plants outcompete short plants for sunlight  Tall plant spores disperse farther, colonizing new environments more rapidly.  Taller forms favored by natural selection  26) What are sporophylls? Modified leaves that have sporangia  27) What do roots do? They anchor vascular plants to grow taller 28) What is the importance of leaves? They increase plant body surface area and are the primary photosynthethic  organ of  vascular plants 29) What are the two types of leaves? Microphylls and Megaphylls 30) Where are microphylls found and what is their structure? Found only in lycophytes
They’re small and supported by one strand of unbranched vascular tissue. (ex. 
ordinary leaf) 
background image Sporangiun on  Sporophyll  Single Type of  Spore created Bisexual  Gametophyte  (includes male  and female  gametophyte) Eggs __________________ Sperm Megasporangium on  megasoporophyll Mega spore Female  Gametophyte  Eggs Micro sporangiu m on  micro sporophyl Micro spore Male   Gametophyte Sperm 31) Where are megaphylls found and what is their structure? Found in most vascular plants  They’re larger and more photosynthetic with branching vascular tissue (ex. Maple leaf) 32) Explain the process of Homosporous Spore Production  Occurs in most seedless vascular plants (ferns) 33) Explain the process for Heterosporous Spore Production  Two types of sporangia create two kinds of spores  All seed plants are heterosporous   34) What is a strobilus? Area where spores are made  35) Are club mosses (lycophytes) true mosses? NO 36) In which two major time periods did plants develop vascular systems? Devonian & Carboniferus  37) What happened to the forests in the Carboniferus period? They turned into coal after a major cooling period occurred.  Chapter 30: Plant Diversity II – The Evolution of Seed Plants  
Tarana Sidhu 
BY 124 w/ Dr. Cusic  

This is the end of the preview. Please to view the rest of the content
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Alabama at Birmingham who use StudySoup to get ahead
25 Pages 59 Views 47 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join more than 18,000+ college students at University of Alabama at Birmingham who use StudySoup to get ahead
School: University of Alabama at Birmingham
Department: Biology
Course: Intro to Biology 124
Professor: Cusic
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: plants, vascular, nonvascular, Biology, Soil, roots, Stems, leaves, Gynmosperms, angiosperms, Seeds, spores, lifecycle, Trees, flowers, Monocots, Dicots, xylem, phloem, cells, and plantcells
Name: BY 124 UNIT 1 STUDY GUIDE
Description: This study guide covers Chapters 29, 30, 35, 36. Chapters 37 & 39 will also be on the exam. This can be a useful tool for a quick self assessment on most of this unit.
Uploaded: 01/29/2017
25 Pages 59 Views 47 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to UAB - BY 124 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to UAB - BY 124 - Study Guide - Midterm

Forgot password? Reset password here

Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here