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UGA - ANTH 1102 - Exam 1 Practice Questions and Additional Notes -

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UGA - ANTH 1102 - Exam 1 Practice Questions and Additional Notes -

School: University of Georgia
Department: Sociology
Course: Intro to Anthropology
Professor: Jason Gonzalez
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Anthropology
Name: Exam 1 Practice Questions and Additional Notes
Description: Here's a bunch of practice questions that I've pulled from various tests in the past. I've also added my notes on a couple of the supplemental readings in class because I know that a lot of you guys don't actually read those, but they do contain information that can be on the exam. Enjoy!
Uploaded: 01/31/2017
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background image Exam 1 Practice Questions 1. Which of the following statements BEST describes the academic  discipline of anthropology as it is practiced today, as distinct from the 
other social sciences?
a. The study of human beings
b. The study of human cultural, biological, and linguistic diversity 
and change c. The study of cultural progress of the races, seeking to explain  how some peoples have become so much more evolved from 
others
d. The study of unexplained phenomena like UFOs and Bigfoot
e. An inspiring place to shop for women’s clothing, accessories, and
home décor 2. Ethnography differs from other social science methods primarily  because ethnographers… a. Do almost exclusively surveys and questionnaires
b. Study broad trends at the national level
c. Do not need to worry about the ethics of their research
d. Work with large data sets collected from over a large sample of 
respondents e. None of the above 3. All of these statements represent cultural relativism except for one.   Which statement does NOT demonstrate cultural relativism?   a. Xigu people will castrate men who are convicted of crimes.   Personally, I think this is wrong, but, I will try not to let that 
influence my study of Xigu life 
b. Quechua people living in the Andes Mountains eat cute and  cuddly guinea pigs.  Sure, why not?  c. Although John believes in the power of the free market and  capitalism, he does not let this influence his interpretations of 
the Nadu people who share everything and punish those who 
earn profit  
d. After careful comparison of different cultures (and reflection on  my own personal life), I have decided that monogamy (two 
people marrying for life) is a superior form of marriage to 
polygamy (more than two people marrying each other at once).  
When I write about the polygamous cultures that I have studied, I
will focus primarily on their inferiority 
e. Aghori people believe that for someone to achieve an  enlightened spiritual state they must touch the dead bodies of 
their ancestors.  As a result they spend a lot of time handling 
dead bodies.  While researchers find this to be personally difficult
background image to witness, they study it without prejudice in recognition of the 
religious significance of this act 
4. What is the major difference between ethnographic methods that rely  on  talking with people versus methods that involve observing people?  a. People's verbal explanations are always etic, but a researcher's  observations tend to be emic  b. People often say things that they know their society considers to  be normal; but if a researcher observes behavior, she can see 
what people actually do 
c. People usually talk about things that are totally unrelated to  common, shared ideas; it is easier find popular beliefs simply by 
observing behavior 
d. Members of most societies are so very individualistic that two  informants will rarely have the same point of view; thus it is 
rather unnecessary to observe behavior
e. Shut up I want to go home now 5. Which piece of evidence does NOT support the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis? (Assume all these statements are factually correct.)  a. The Yaggaaa people have no words for "male" and "female."   Thus a Yaggaaa person is equally likely to mate with a man or a 
woman, and they seem incapable of seeing how men and 
women's genitals are different  
b. Speakers of languages in which it is possible to use the present  tense to discuss future events think about the future as being 
very soon.  Thus, they tend to save a lot of money for retirement 
c. Thayoore hunter-gatherers of Australia have no words for left or  right; they only know north, south, east, and west.  Therefore, 
when Thayoore drive cars they are incapable of understanding 
the directions that their GPS navigators shout at them, such as 
"in 1000 meters turn left at the kangaroo" 
d. Among Mikea of Madagascar there is no word for green;  however, people are perfectly capable of describing how the 
color of green leaves is distinct from the blue sky, red blood, or 
yellow fire. 
e. Because Chichewa speakers in Malawi have no word for “animal” but only words for “pest” and “pet,” they automatically think of 
all animals as being either harmful or helpful
6. Koko the gorilla learned quite a lot of words of American Sign  Language, but she did so much slower than human child would have 
done.  Whereas human children learn grammar and syntax rather 
easily, Koko never mastered grammar and syntax.  What are the 
theoretical implications of this finding?     
a. That Noam Chomsky's theory of language acquisition was wrong  in every detail 
background image b. That the human mind is most likely a blank slate 
c. That all humans probably learn to speak in somewhat similar 
ways, with similar mental structures for learning nouns, verbs, 
and grammar 
d. That Sapir and Whorf successfully anticipated the relationship of  the mind to language and culture  e. That gorillas evolved their heavy chewing muscles in order to eat kittens 7. Your crazy roommate Terry tells you that last night on the Discovery  Channel there was a television show that tried to explain why there 
were pyramids in so many parts of the ancient world-- in ancient Egypt,
Iraq, Mexico, the U.S., and Cambodia.  "The reason so many people 
built pyramids," Terry tells you, "is because they were all contacted by 
extraterrestrials from another planet who taught them how to build 
pyramids."  Using what you have learned about how anthropologists 
practice anthropology today, you reply to Terry by saying, "professional
archaeologists think that it is unlikely that aliens taught ancient 
peoples to build pyramids because.... 
a. "A better explanation is that building pyramids is just something  that all people inevitably do when they progress from being 
primitive savages to being advanced and civilized." 
b. "There is some implied racism in the alien explanation; it implies  that non-western people are too primitive and simple to 
assemble large piles of stone or dirt.  The pyramid shape is the 
easiest way to stack stone or dirt." 
c. "Archaeologists are unlikely to be concerned with pyramids  because they are more interested in finding dinosaurs and 
treasure." 
d. "Civilization evolved first in Egypt.  The only reason other  peoples advanced out of savagery at all was because they were 
in contact with the Egyptians.  Egyptians taught all of the other 
ancient peoples the craft of pyramid building.  No aliens were 
involved" 
e. "Civilization evolved first among the Aztecs of Mexico.  The only  reason other peoples advanced out of savagery at all was 
because they were in contact with the Aztecs.  Aztecs taught all 
of the other ancient peoples the craft of pyramid building.  No 
aliens were involved"
8. Osh-Tisch is a Native American person belonging to the Crow peoples  of Wyoming.  Osh-Tisch was born with X and Y chromosomes, a penis, 
and testes, but mostly dressed in women’s clothes and performed 
women’s work and ritual roles.  An anthropologist would say that Osh-
Tisch's sex was ______ but Osh-Tisch's gender was _______. 
a. Male, a female two-spirit 

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School: University of Georgia
Department: Sociology
Course: Intro to Anthropology
Professor: Jason Gonzalez
Term: Fall 2016
Tags: Anthropology
Name: Exam 1 Practice Questions and Additional Notes
Description: Here's a bunch of practice questions that I've pulled from various tests in the past. I've also added my notes on a couple of the supplemental readings in class because I know that a lot of you guys don't actually read those, but they do contain information that can be on the exam. Enjoy!
Uploaded: 01/31/2017
8 Pages 84 Views 67 Unlocks
  • Better Grades Guarantee
  • 24/7 Homework help
  • Notes, Study Guides, Flashcards + More!
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