×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to GSU - POLS 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to GSU - POLS 1101 - Study Guide - Midterm

Already have an account? Login here
×
Reset your password

GSU / Engineering / POLS 1101 / How the government rules?

How the government rules?

How the government rules?

Description

School: Georgia State University
Department: Engineering
Course: American Government
Professor: Larry stewart
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: american and Government
Cost: 50
Name: American Government Exam 1 Overview Notes
Description: These are notes for chapters 1 - 4 which is covered on exam 1
Uploaded: 02/06/2017
12 Pages 44 Views 4 Unlocks
Reviews


Chapter 1 


How the government rules?



∙ Government: a set of institutions that endures over time and that, in relation to the people of a

particular territory, authoritatively makes and enforces laws

∙ Let’s break up the definition if government:

o “Set of institutions that endures overtime”

 In America, we have the three branches of government (executive, legislative, 

and judicial) that existed over a long time

o “In relation to the people of a particular territory”

 The government has authority over the people located in specific government 

territories

 US territory: 50 states, D.C. and 16 territories

 Federalism: authority is partly divided and partly shared between the federal 


What does the american creed say?



government and the 50 state governments

o “Authoritatively makes and enforces laws”

 Legitimate claim to authority: rightful or justifies claim of authority over an 

individual or territory

 Statutes: laws made by Congress or state legislatures

 Ordinances: laws made by city (or “municipal”) legislatures (like the Atlanta 

City Council)

o Governments can use physical force

 Military,

 Police 

o Governments are “sovereign”

 Sovereign: the highest authority to rule over a given territory

∙ How the government rules:

o Gov. rules by affecting hearts and minds If you want to learn more check out What is shays rebellion and why is it important?

 Public education, holidays to promote nationalism, pledge, media campaigns, 


What did the continental congress do?



etc.

o Gov. rules through positive and negative incentives

∙ Gov. provides public goods

o Public goods: goods that once provided, no one can be excluded from the benefits Chapter 2 

∙ Purposes of governments:

o Securing rights

 The primary purpose of governments are to secure natural and legal rights  Natural rights: rights to exist by nature If you want to learn more check out How might a contemporary person in britain have reacted to the portrait of omai kneeling before the king?

 Legal rights: part of written human law

o Promote happiness and welfare

∙ Illegitimate purposes of government in the eyes of Americans:

o Theocracy: government based on religion

o Racial supremacy

o State of socialism

∙ America’s form of government: Democracy If you want to learn more check out What kind of exercise is good for pregnant women?

o Constitutional government

 Rule of law: all government actions must be authorized by pre­existing laws 

and that lawmakers may not exempt themselves from the laws they make  The US constitution is the fundamental law (highest or supreme law)

o Limited government

 Government’s power is limited to protect rights

∙ What is a democracy?

o Democracy: a form of government in which the people are in control of the 

government

o Citizens elect who serves in government

 Running for government positions

 Voting

 Openly advocate for a candidate We also discuss several other topics like What can we see with the given light out in space?

 Donate to a campaign

 Work for or donate to a political party

 Directly voice concerns to government officials If you want to learn more check out What is atomic orbital?

 Work or donate to an interest group

 Serve as a jury

Chapter 4 

∙ To understand the principles, origin, and development of The U.S. Constitution, it is useful to

know a little bit about the American experience

o Colonial constitutionalism

 For most of colonial history, colonist lived under “constitution of British 

Empire”

 The English Bill of Rights is the name given to the first ten amendments and 

were first established by colonial Americans in 1689 We also discuss several other topics like How can we describe the structure of a eukaryotic chromosome?

o Road to independence

 The disagreements between British Parliament and the colonies pushed 

colonies to pursue independence 

∙ Stamp Act: tax on paper goods

∙ Intolerable Acts: set of repressible laws set by the British Parliament 

 The First Continental Congress: the first time the Americans from different 

colonies came together to engage in self­governance on a "continental" scale o America’s Creed

 We hold these truths to be self­evident, that all men are created equal, that  they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these  rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers  from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government  becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to  abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such  principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most 

likely to effect their Safety and Happiness

 “that all men are created equal”

∙ This relates back to natural rights 

∙ Have had very controversial moments in history that break this part of 

America’s Creed (ex. Jim Crow Laws)

 “that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness”

∙ This again relates to natural rights 

 “Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the 

consent of the governed”

∙ This relates to the principle of limited government which implies that 

the government rules the people but is also ruled by the people

 “it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new  Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its 

powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety 

and Happiness”

∙ Popular sovereignty:  the idea that the people are the highest authority  ∙ Making the constitution

o The authors drew inspiration from a number of things:

 Their own experience with Great Britain 

 Age of Enlightenment

 Montesquieu (gave inspiration for separation of powers)

∙ State constitutions: although each state developed their own constitution, there were various 

similarities among the different state constitutions

o Tightly Democratically Controlled Legislatures

 Members of the state legislatures were regularly held accountable to voters

o Legislative Dominance 

 In theory, this is the same as separation of powers on a state government scale o Declarations of Individual Rights

 Designed constitutions with the intention to give government power as well as

protect human rights

∙ Continental Congress: Americans came together to discuss gov. as a contaminant instead of 

independent colonies or states

∙ Articles of Confederation: the first constitution for the central gov. 

o They were used as the primary constitution from 1781 – 88 until constitution was 

ratified in 88

o They needed to be replaced because the gov. it created was to weak and allowed the 

states to have too much power and independence

∙ Government created by the AoC

o Confederacy: the states maintain as much sovereignty and independence as possible 

and the central gov. only has authority over the states instead of the individual o No branches of Gov: unicameral government

o Lack of clear supremacy of treaties or other national laws: Due to this lack of clarity,  states often passed laws that contradicted the terms of treaties entered into by the U.S.

with foreign countries which lead to conflicts with other countries

o Tight Control of Congressional Delegates by State Legislatures: delegates in congress were tightly controlled by state legislatures. States could replace delegates if they 

wanted to even if their short 1 year term wasn’t over

o Supermajority Voting in Congress: more than the majority was needed for a vote 

(around 70% or 2/3 were needed to be considered a majority)

o No Direct Control by the People over Congress: the people did not elect their reps for 

congress

∙ Creation of the constitution

o Critical period (1783 – 1789)

o Constitution Convention of 1787 (aka Philadelphia Convention): meeting in which 55

delegates from 12 of the 13 states wrote the constitution and ratified it

 Virginia Plan (James Madison): have a central gov with power over people, 

bicameral legislature, and three branches of gov with checks and balences    New Jersey Plan (William Patterson): unicameral congress, no checks and 

balances, no direct control of people on congress

 The Great Comp.: solved the disagreement between small states and large  states; it was determined that the House would have proportional 

representation (favors Virginia plan) and the senate would have equal state 

representatives (favors New Jersey plan)

  Three Fifths Clause: slaves counted as 3/5th of a person when calculating 

states number of seats in the House of Rep

 Electoral College: system established to select president

 Slave Trade Clauses

 Fugitive slave Clause: granted slave owners a constitutional right to recapture  runaway slaves who had fled to other states, and it took away the right of 

states to pass laws to protect and/or emancipate runaway slaves

o Design of the original Constitution (preamble and 7 articles including bill of rights):  Federalism

 Popular Soverignty

 Representative democracy (voting)

 Bicameral

 Separation of powers and checks and balances 

 Small list of civil liberties (Bill of Rights)

∙ Development of modern constitution

o Progressive Era:

 16th amendment: progressive income tax

 17th amendment: mandated that Senators must be elected by the people instead

of appointed by state legislatures

 18th amendment: prohibited sale of alcohol 

 19th amendment: allowed women the right to vote

o FDR Amendments:

 20th amendment: moved the President’s Inauguration Day to January 20th and 

required Congress to convene on January 3rd 

 21st amendment: ended prohibition 

 22nd amendment: setting president serving cap to 2 terms

o Civil Rights Era:

 23rd amendment: granted Washington D.C. the right to have Electoral College 

votes in presidential elections

 24th amendment: ended poll tax when voting (poll taxes were set in place to 

discourage African Americans from voting)

o Cold War:

 25th amendment: specified what would happen if a president is unfit to serve 

(happen because of JFK)

 26th amendment: put voting age to 18

o Gregory Watson’s Amendment

 27th amendment: when Congress votes to raise the pay of Congress members,  the pay increase cannot take effect until after the next congressional election

Chapter 1 

∙ Government: a set of institutions that endures over time and that, in relation to the people of a

particular territory, authoritatively makes and enforces laws

∙ Let’s break up the definition if government:

o “Set of institutions that endures overtime”

 In America, we have the three branches of government (executive, legislative, 

and judicial) that existed over a long time

o “In relation to the people of a particular territory”

 The government has authority over the people located in specific government 

territories

 US territory: 50 states, D.C. and 16 territories

 Federalism: authority is partly divided and partly shared between the federal 

government and the 50 state governments

o “Authoritatively makes and enforces laws”

 Legitimate claim to authority: rightful or justifies claim of authority over an 

individual or territory

 Statutes: laws made by Congress or state legislatures

 Ordinances: laws made by city (or “municipal”) legislatures (like the Atlanta 

City Council)

o Governments can use physical force

 Military,

 Police 

o Governments are “sovereign”

 Sovereign: the highest authority to rule over a given territory

∙ How the government rules:

o Gov. rules by affecting hearts and minds

 Public education, holidays to promote nationalism, pledge, media campaigns, 

etc.

o Gov. rules through positive and negative incentives

∙ Gov. provides public goods

o Public goods: goods that once provided, no one can be excluded from the benefits Chapter 2 

∙ Purposes of governments:

o Securing rights

 The primary purpose of governments are to secure natural and legal rights  Natural rights: rights to exist by nature

 Legal rights: part of written human law

o Promote happiness and welfare

∙ Illegitimate purposes of government in the eyes of Americans:

o Theocracy: government based on religion

o Racial supremacy

o State of socialism

∙ America’s form of government: Democracy

o Constitutional government

 Rule of law: all government actions must be authorized by pre­existing laws 

and that lawmakers may not exempt themselves from the laws they make  The US constitution is the fundamental law (highest or supreme law)

o Limited government

 Government’s power is limited to protect rights

∙ What is a democracy?

o Democracy: a form of government in which the people are in control of the 

government

o Citizens elect who serves in government

 Running for government positions

 Voting

 Openly advocate for a candidate

 Donate to a campaign

 Work for or donate to a political party

 Directly voice concerns to government officials

 Work or donate to an interest group

 Serve as a jury

Chapter 4 

∙ To understand the principles, origin, and development of The U.S. Constitution, it is useful to

know a little bit about the American experience

o Colonial constitutionalism

 For most of colonial history, colonist lived under “constitution of British 

Empire”

 The English Bill of Rights is the name given to the first ten amendments and 

were first established by colonial Americans in 1689

o Road to independence

 The disagreements between British Parliament and the colonies pushed 

colonies to pursue independence 

∙ Stamp Act: tax on paper goods

∙ Intolerable Acts: set of repressible laws set by the British Parliament 

 The First Continental Congress: the first time the Americans from different 

colonies came together to engage in self­governance on a "continental" scale o America’s Creed

 We hold these truths to be self­evident, that all men are created equal, that  they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these  rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers  from the consent of the governed, That whenever any Form of Government  becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to  abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such  principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most 

likely to effect their Safety and Happiness

 “that all men are created equal”

∙ This relates back to natural rights 

∙ Have had very controversial moments in history that break this part of 

America’s Creed (ex. Jim Crow Laws)

 “that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness”

∙ This again relates to natural rights 

 “Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the 

consent of the governed”

∙ This relates to the principle of limited government which implies that 

the government rules the people but is also ruled by the people

 “it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new  Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its 

powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety 

and Happiness”

∙ Popular sovereignty:  the idea that the people are the highest authority  ∙ Making the constitution

o The authors drew inspiration from a number of things:

 Their own experience with Great Britain 

 Age of Enlightenment

 Montesquieu (gave inspiration for separation of powers)

∙ State constitutions: although each state developed their own constitution, there were various 

similarities among the different state constitutions

o Tightly Democratically Controlled Legislatures

 Members of the state legislatures were regularly held accountable to voters

o Legislative Dominance 

 In theory, this is the same as separation of powers on a state government scale o Declarations of Individual Rights

 Designed constitutions with the intention to give government power as well as

protect human rights

∙ Continental Congress: Americans came together to discuss gov. as a contaminant instead of 

independent colonies or states

∙ Articles of Confederation: the first constitution for the central gov. 

o They were used as the primary constitution from 1781 – 88 until constitution was 

ratified in 88

o They needed to be replaced because the gov. it created was to weak and allowed the 

states to have too much power and independence

∙ Government created by the AoC

o Confederacy: the states maintain as much sovereignty and independence as possible 

and the central gov. only has authority over the states instead of the individual o No branches of Gov: unicameral government

o Lack of clear supremacy of treaties or other national laws: Due to this lack of clarity,  states often passed laws that contradicted the terms of treaties entered into by the U.S.

with foreign countries which lead to conflicts with other countries

o Tight Control of Congressional Delegates by State Legislatures: delegates in congress were tightly controlled by state legislatures. States could replace delegates if they 

wanted to even if their short 1 year term wasn’t over

o Supermajority Voting in Congress: more than the majority was needed for a vote 

(around 70% or 2/3 were needed to be considered a majority)

o No Direct Control by the People over Congress: the people did not elect their reps for 

congress

∙ Creation of the constitution

o Critical period (1783 – 1789)

o Constitution Convention of 1787 (aka Philadelphia Convention): meeting in which 55

delegates from 12 of the 13 states wrote the constitution and ratified it

 Virginia Plan (James Madison): have a central gov with power over people, 

bicameral legislature, and three branches of gov with checks and balences    New Jersey Plan (William Patterson): unicameral congress, no checks and 

balances, no direct control of people on congress

 The Great Comp.: solved the disagreement between small states and large  states; it was determined that the House would have proportional 

representation (favors Virginia plan) and the senate would have equal state 

representatives (favors New Jersey plan)

  Three Fifths Clause: slaves counted as 3/5th of a person when calculating 

states number of seats in the House of Rep

 Electoral College: system established to select president

 Slave Trade Clauses

 Fugitive slave Clause: granted slave owners a constitutional right to recapture  runaway slaves who had fled to other states, and it took away the right of 

states to pass laws to protect and/or emancipate runaway slaves

o Design of the original Constitution (preamble and 7 articles including bill of rights):  Federalism

 Popular Soverignty

 Representative democracy (voting)

 Bicameral

 Separation of powers and checks and balances 

 Small list of civil liberties (Bill of Rights)

∙ Development of modern constitution

o Progressive Era:

 16th amendment: progressive income tax

 17th amendment: mandated that Senators must be elected by the people instead

of appointed by state legislatures

 18th amendment: prohibited sale of alcohol 

 19th amendment: allowed women the right to vote

o FDR Amendments:

 20th amendment: moved the President’s Inauguration Day to January 20th and 

required Congress to convene on January 3rd 

 21st amendment: ended prohibition 

 22nd amendment: setting president serving cap to 2 terms

o Civil Rights Era:

 23rd amendment: granted Washington D.C. the right to have Electoral College 

votes in presidential elections

 24th amendment: ended poll tax when voting (poll taxes were set in place to 

discourage African Americans from voting)

o Cold War:

 25th amendment: specified what would happen if a president is unfit to serve 

(happen because of JFK)

 26th amendment: put voting age to 18

o Gregory Watson’s Amendment

 27th amendment: when Congress votes to raise the pay of Congress members,  the pay increase cannot take effect until after the next congressional election

Page Expired
5off
It looks like your free minutes have expired! Lucky for you we have all the content you need, just sign up here