Limited time offer 20% OFF StudySoup Subscription details

FSU - CLP 4143 - Abnormal psych - Study Guide

Created by: Kelly Landa Elite Notetaker

> > > > FSU - CLP 4143 - Abnormal psych - Study Guide

FSU - CLP 4143 - Abnormal psych - Study Guide

School: Florida State University
Department: OTHER
Course: Abnormal Psychology
Professor: Natalie Sachs-Ericsson
Term: Spring 2017
Tags: Psychology
Name: Abnormal psych
Description: Test 1 review
Uploaded: 02/06/2017
0 5 3 85 Reviews
This preview shows pages 1 - 7 of a 54 page document. to view the rest of the content
background image Exam 1 Study Guide  Introduction  & Historical  preview  Chapter 1  The study of mental disorders  It studies the nature, development, & treatment  of psychological disorders  Avoid preconceived notions  - Maintain  objectivity  - Reduce stigma  - Challenges to this  study include  Psychopathology  Emotional  pain & suffering  - Personal distress  Ex: Poor work performance  or serious  fight with ones spouse § Impairment  in some important  area of life  - Disability  Makes others uncomfortable  or causes problems  - Violation of social norms  The disorder occurs within the individual  - It involves clinically  proven significant  difficulties  in thinking,  feeling, or behaving  - It involves dysfunction in processes that support mental  functioning  - It is not a culturally  specific  reaction  to an event  - It is not mainly a result  of a problem  with society or social deviance  - When thinking of defining a mental  disorder one must also take these things into consideration:  Defining mental disorder  Distinguishing  label is applied  I. Label refers  to undesirable  attributes  II. People with the label  are seen as different  III. People with the label  are discriminated  against  IV. The four characteristics  of a stigma  are:  Stigma  Possession by evil being or spirits  / Exorcism  - Early Demonology  Mental disturbances  have natural  causes, they are not supernatural,  instead  they are due to problems  in the brain § Mania  I. Melancholia  II. Phrenitis  (Brain fever)  III. Three categories  of mental  disorders  § Blood  I. Black bile  II. Yellow bile  III. Phlegm IV. Normal brain functioning depend on balance of four humors § Hippocrates (5th century BC)  - Early Biological Explanations  Torture sometimes  led to delusional  sounding confessions  - Historians  have concluded that many of the accused were mentally  ill (little  support was found for this conclusion)  - Witches (13th century AD)  They were trials  held to determine  sanity   - Began in 13th century England  - Municipal  authorities  assumed responsibility  for care of mentally  ill  - "Lunacy" attributes  insanity  to misalignment  of moon (luna) and the stars  - Lunacy trials  They were established  for the care and confinement  of the mentally  ill in 15th century AD  - The institute  was called St. Mary of Bethlehem  § Wealthy people would pay to look at the insane  § One of the first  mental  institutions  was founded in 1243  - Treatment  in asylums  was either  non-existent  or harmful  to the patients  - promoted public health by advocating  for personal hygiene and a clean environment § Pioneered humanitarian  treatment  § Benjamin Rush - French physician  who was instrumental  in the development  of a more humane approach to the custody and care of 
psychiatric  patients.  This is referred  to as moral  therapy 
§ He also made contributions  to the classification  of mental  disorders and has been described by some as "father of 
modern psychiatry" 
§ Philippe Pinel (20 April 1745-25 October 1826) - Patients  engaged in calming  and purposeful activities    Talked with attendants  Small, privately  funded, humanitarian  hospitals  § Moral treatment - Asylums  Brief history of Psychopathology  Crusader for pioneers  and mentally  ill  - Urged improvement  of institutions  - Worked to establish  32 new, public  hospitals  - Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) (American  activists)  Psychological  (delusions and grandeur)  I. Physical symptoms  (progressive  paralysis)  II. Degenerative disorder  with psychological  symptoms  and physical symptoms  - It is a neuropsychiatric  disorder that  affects the brain  - Was originally  considered a psychiatric  disorder  when it was scientifically  identified  around the 19th century.  - Patient usually  presented with psychotic  symptoms  of sudden and often dramatic  onset.  - Since general paresis had biological  cause, other mental illness  might also have biological  causes  Biological  causes of psychopathology gained credibility  By mid-1800s it was known that general  paresis and syphilis  occurred together in some patients,  in 1905 the biological 
causes of syphilis  were found 
- General Paresis (syphilis)  Parents jointly  contribute  one half  I. Grandparents one quarter II. Great - grandparents one eighth….  Etc  III. His law states  that our heritage  is, on average, constituted  from that of our ancestors  according to the following proportions:  - Galton's (1822-1911) work lead to notion that mental  illness  can be inherited  Promotion  of enforced sterilization  to eliminate  undesirable  characteristics  from the population  - Many state  laws required mentally  ill  to be sterilized  - Eugenics The evolution of Contemporary thought Sakel (1930's)  - Insulin-coma  therapy  1938  - Used for schizophrenic  patients  § Induced epileptic  seizures with electric  shock  - Did NOT help them at all  - Does help severe depression  - Electroconvulsive  Therapy (ECT)  Moniz (1935)  - Often used to control violent  behaviors;  led to listlessness,  apathy, and loss of cognitive abilities  - Prefrontal  lobotomy  Early Biological treatments  Treated patients  with hysteria  - Using "animal magnetism"  - Early practitioner  of hypnosis  - Student: Charcot  - Mesmer (1734-1815)  Medical doctor (1825-1893)  - His support legitimizes  hypnosis as treatment  for hysteria  - Charcot  Anna O. was the pseudonym of a patient of Josef Breuer, who published her case study in his book "Studies on 
Hysteria", written in collaboration  with Sigmund Freud. 
§ Her real name was Bertha Pappenheim (1859-1936)  § She was an Austrian-Jewish  feminist  and the founder of the League of Jewish Women.  § Despite the Breuer and Freud's claims,  Anna O did NOT get better  from her treatment  with Breuer and was 
hospitalized  several  times afterward. 
§ She appeared to have neurological  problems  (perhaps epilepsy)  § Used hypnosis to facilitate  catharsis  in Anna O.  - Release of emotional  tension triggered  by reliving  and talking about event.  § Cathartic  method - Breuer (1842-1925)  Breuer and Freud jointly  published, "Studies in Hysteria" in 1895, which serves as the basis for Freud's theory. - Human behavior determined  by unconscious forces  § Psychopathology results  from conflicts  among these unconscious forces  § Freudian or Psychoanalytic  theory  - Composed of biological,  instinctual  drives  I. Innate (born with it)  II. Seeks immediate,  indiscriminant  gratification III. Source of mental energy  IV. Obeys the pleasure  principal:  pleasure is good, and nothing else matters.  V. Libido: biological  force (energy of ID)  VI. Thanatos: The death instinct  VII. Gratifying  urges returns  body to homeostasis  VIII. ID (Primal  desires/Basic  nature) § Organized, rational, reality-oriented  system  I. Develops first  2 years of life as infant experiences  reality  II. Holds id in check until  suitable object  is found  III. Helps id achieve gratification  within confines of reality  IV. Prevents id drives  from violating superego principles  V. Obeys the reality  principle:  Behavior takes into account the external  world  VI. Ego (Reason/Self control) § Learned  I. Inhibits  ("breaks") id urges  II. Strives for perfection  III. "Irrational"  operates on extremes good or bad  IV. Ego ideals - The person we'd like to be  V. Developed through rewards  VI. Conscience - right and wrong  VII. Developed though punishment  VIII. Formed around age 5 via Oedipal complex  resolution  IX. Superego (The quest for perfection)  § Freud's Structural  Model  - Freud (1856-1939) The evolution of contemporary thought Ego generates strategies  to protect itself  from  anxiety  § Defense mechanisms:  Psychological  maneuvers used to manage stress & anxiety  Conflict generates  anxiety  - Id, Ego, & Superego continually  in conflict  Repression: Keeping unacceptable impulses  or wishes from conscious awareness  - Denial: Not accepting a painful  reality  into conscious awareness  - Projection:  Attributing  to someone else one's own unacceptable  thoughts or feelings - Displacement:  Redirecting  emotional  responses from their  real target to someone else  - Reaction formation:  Converting an unacceptable feeling into its opposite  - Regression: Retreating  to the behavioral  patterns of an earlier  stage of development   - Rationalize:  Offering acceptable  reasons for an unacceptable action or attitude  - Sublimation:  Converting unacceptable aggressive  or sexual impulses  into socially valued behaviors  - Selected defense mechanisms  Defense Mechanisms  Understand early-childhood  experiences,  particularly  key (parental)  relationships  - Understand patterns in current relationships  - Goals of psychoanalytic therapy or psychoanalysis  The patient tries  to say whatever comes to mind without censoring  anything  Free Association  - Transference is a phenomenon characterized  by unconscious redirection  of feelings  from one person to another 
(patient  to therapist) 
The patient responds to the analyst  in ways that the patient  has previously  responded to other important  figures  in his 
or her life, and the analyst helps the patient  understand and interpret  these responses 
Analysis of transference  - The Liberation from  the conflict  (effects  of the unconscious material)  is achieved through bringing this material  into 
the conscious mind 
The analysts points out to the patient  the meaning of certain  of the patient's  behaviors  Interpretation  - Psychoanalytic  Techniques  Psychoanalytic  Therapy  Analytical  psychology  - Archetypes  According to Jungian Psychoanalysis,  the Great Mother archetype symbolizes  creativity,  birth,  fertility,  sexual 
union and nurturing.  She is a creative force not only for life, but also for art and ideas 
The mother figure  Collective  unconscious  - Jung (1875-1961) Childhood experiences help shape adult personality  - There are unconscious influences  on behavior  - Continuing influences  of Freud and his followers  Neo-Freudians  Focus on observable behavior  Emphasis on learning  rather than thinking  or innate tendencies  Behaviorism  - Classical  conditioning  Operant conditioning  Modeling  Three types of learning  - John Watson (1878-1958) In behaviorist  terms,  the dog's salivation  is known as an unconditioned  response ( a stimulus- response connection that 
required no learning) 
- Unconditioned stimulus  (Food) > Unconditioned response (salivation)  In behaviorist  terms  it is written  as:  - Pavlov showed the existence of the unconditioned  response by presenting a dog with a bowl of food and then measuring  its 
salivary  secretions 
- Pavlovian conditioning  (Pavlov's dogs)  Meat powder (automatically  elicits  salivation)  Unconditioned stimulus  (USC) - Salivation  (automatic  response to meat powder)  Unconditioned response (UR) - Initial  ringing of bell (does not automatically  elicit  salivation)  Neutral stimulus  (NS) - After pairing the NS and the UCS, the NS becomes a CS (bell  now automatically  elicits  salivation)  Conditioned stimulus  (CS) - Salivation  (automatic  response to bell)  Condition response (CR)  - CS (bell) not followed by USC (meat powder) causes gradual disappearance  of CR (salivation)  Extinction  - Discovered by Pavlov (1849-1936)  Principle  of reinforcement  Behaviors followed by pleasant stimuli  are strengthened  Positive  reinforcement  Behaviors that terminate  negative stimulus  are strengthened  Negative reinforcement  B.F Skinner (1904-1990)  - Operant Conditioning;  behavior that operates  on the environment  Can occur without reinforcement  Learning by watching and imitating  others behaviors  - Modeling reduced children's fear of dogs  Bandura & Menlove (1968)  - Modeling  Used to treat  phobias  Combines deep muscle relaxation  and gradual exposure to the feared condition  or object  Usually starts with minimal  anxiety producing condition  and gradually progresses  to more feared Systematic  desensitization  (imagine  what you fear while in deep relaxation) - Rewarding a behavior only occasionally  more effective  than continuous schedules of reinforcement  Intermittent  reinforcement  - Behavior Therapy or Behavior modification  The evolution of contemporary thought  How we think or appraise a situation  influences  our feelings and behaviors  - Limitations  of behavior therapy  Emphasizes how people think about themselves  and their  experiences can be a major  determinant  of psychopathology  - Focus on understanding  maladaptive  thoughts  - Change cognitions to change feelings  and behaviors  - Cognitive therapy  Importance  of cognitions  Chapter 2 A paradigm is a set of basic assumptions  that influence how you think about data  - Paradigms in psychopathology  Aim for objectivity  Goal: Study abnormal behavior scientifically.  - We can never really be objective;  subjective  factors  interfere Perspective  or conceptual framework  from within which a scientist  operates  Paradigm (Thomas Kuhn)  - Notion of a paradigm  Current Paradigms of psychopathology  Behavioral genetics  - Molecular  genetics  - Gene-environment  interactions  - Genetic paradigm  The Genetic paradigm  Carriers of genetic information  - Ex: relationships,  culture  Impacted by environment  influences  - Relationship  between genes and environment  is bidirectional  - Genes  Proteins influence  whether the action of a specific gene will occur  - Gene expression  Multiple  gene pairs vs. single gene  - A number of gene pairs combine their influences  to create a single (phenotypic)  trait  - Polygenic transmission  Extent to which variability  In behavior is due to genetic factors  - It estimates  range from 0.0 to 1.0, the higher the number, the greater the heritability  - Heritability  Heredity plays a role in most behavior  Ex: siblings  who are raised in the same environment,  by the same parents,  go to the same school, etc…  Events and experiences that family  members  have in common  - Shared environment  Ex: one sibling  might have been in a car accident but not the other Events and experiences that are unique to each family  member  - Nonshared environment  Environmental  effects  Study of the degree to which genes and environmental  factors  influence behavior  Genetic material  by an individual  - They are unobservable  - Consists of inherited genes  Genotype: The total  genetic makeup of a person  - Genotypes (unobservable)  Observable expression of the genes  Expressed genetic material  - Ex: Green eyes  Observable behavior or characteristics  - Depends on interaction  of genotype and environment  - Phenotype (observable)  Behavior genetics  The field of biology and genetics  that studies the structure  and function of genes at a molecular  level  *Remember APOE, allele 4 associated  with AD Different  in DNA sequence on a gene occurring in a population Alleles  - Difference in DNA sequence on a gene occurring  in a population  Polymorphism  - Refers to differences  between people In a single nucleotide  in the DNA sequence of a particular  gene.  One area of interest  in the study of gene sequence involves identifying  what are called single nucleotide  polymorphisms  or 
SNPs 
- A CNV can be present in a single gene or multiple  genes. The name refers  to an abnormal  copy of one or more 
sections  of DNA within the gene(s).
Another area of interest  is the study of differences  between people in gene culture,  including the identification  of what are
called copy number variations  (CNVs) 
- Identifies  particular  genes and their  functions  Molecular  genetics  An example would be if a person has gene XYZ, he or she might respond to a snake bite by developing a fear of snakes. 
Another person without gene XYZ would not have developed a fear of snakes after  being bitten. 
- Another example  would  be depression  - One's response to a specific  environmental  event is influenced by genes Researchers had found that those with either the short-short  allele  or the short-long  allele combinations  of the 5-HTT 
gene  
This shows how it was a combination  of the genes and the environment.  I. and  were maltreated  as children were most  likely to have major depressive disorder  as adults than either those people 
who had the gene combination  but where not maltreated  as children  or those who had the long-long allele  but where 
also maltreated  as children. 
This gene has a polymorphism  such that some people have two short alleles  (short-short),  some have two long alleles (long-
long) and some have one short one long (long-short). 
- Serotonin transporter  gene (5-HTT)  The study of the phenotypic trait  variations  caused by environmental  factors  that switch genes on and off - Epigenetics  Ex: A genetic risk for alcohol use disorder may predispose persons to life events that put them in high risk situations 
for alcohol use such as being in trouble with the law. 
The basic idea is that genes may predispose us to seek out certain  environments  that then increase  our risk to developing a 
particular  disorder. 
- Reciprocal gene-environment  interactions  Gene-Environment  Interaction Examines the contribution  of brain structure  and function to psychopathology  - The neuroscience paradigm  holds that mental  disorders  are linked to aberrant processes in the brain.  Neurons and neurotransmitters  I. Brain structure and function  II. Neuroendocrine system III. Three major  components are:  Cell body  I. Dendrites  II. Axons  III. Terminal  buttons  IV. Four major parts  include:  Neurons: cells of the nervous system  - Nerve impulse:  Occurs when a neuron is appropriately  stimulated  at its cell body or through its dendrites.  It travels down 
the axon to the terminal  endings. 
- Synapse: Between the terminal  endings of the sending axon and the cell membrane of the receiving  neuron.  - Neurons   Chemicals that allow neurons to send a signal across the synapse to another neuron  - Excitatory:  Leading to the creation  of a nerve impulse  in the postsynaptic  neuron  I. Inhibitory:  Making the postsynaptic  cell less likely to create a nerve impulse.  II. Receptor sites on postsynaptic  neuron absorb neurotransmitter  which can either  be:  - Reuptake: Reabsorption of leftover  neurotransmitter  by presynaptic  neuron  - Implicated  In depression, mania, and schizophrenia  Serotonin and dopamine  Implicated  in anxiety and other stress-related  disorders  Norepinephrine  Inhibits  nerve impulses  Implicated  in anxiety  Gamma-aminobutyric  acid (GABA)  Several key neurotransmitters  are:  - Excessive or inadequate levels  Insufficient  reuptake  Excessive number or hypersensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  Possible mechanisms:  - Once they are released, they play a role in adjusting the sensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  to dopamine, 
norepinephrine,  or serotonin. 
When a cell has been firing more frequently,  this receptor  releases second messengers.  - Ex: A serotonin agonist is a drug that  stimulates  serotonin receptors  to produce the same effects  as serotonin  does 
naturally. 
Agonist: A drug that stimulates  a particular  neurotransmitter's  receptors.  - Ex: Many drugs used to treat schizophrenia  are dopamine antagonists  that work by blocking dopamine receptors.  Antagonist:  A drug that works on a neurotransmitter's  receptors to dampen the activity  of that neurotransmitter  - Neurotransmitter  HPA axis involved in stress  - Hypothalamus triggers  release of corticotrophin-releasing  hormone (CRF)  - Pituitary  gland releases adrenocorticotropic  hormone (ACTH) - Adrenal cortex triggers  release  of cortisol,  the stress hormone  - The HPA axis of the neuroendocrine  system  Antidepressants  Antipsychotics  Benzodiazepines  Psychoactive drugs alter neurotransmitter  activity  - A neuroscience view does not preclude psychological  interventions  - Neuroscience approaches to treatment  Reductionism:  View that behavior can best be understood by reducing it to its  basic biological  components  - Evaluating the neuroscience paradigm  Current paradigms:  Neuroscience  Roots in learning principles  and cognitive  science  Getting attention  - Escape or avoidance  - Sensory stimulation  - Access to desirable objects  or events  - Behavior is reinforced  by consequences such as:  Strengthens responses  - Ex: Giving a dog a treat after she sits.  Presents something  pleasant after  a behavior is emitted  - Positive  reinforcement  All behavior is determined  by our reinforcement  history  - B.F Skinner  Ex: Time- out, when a child behaves incorrectly  and as a consequence is sent for a period of time to a location  with no 
positive  reinforcement. 
- In order to alter  behavior, one must modify consequences  Relaxation plus imagined exposure  - Important  treatment  for anxiety disorders  - Driving to clinic  1. Entering treatment  room  2. Seeing clinic nurse  3. Train patient to associate alternative  response (ex: deep muscle relaxation)  with these events.  § Construct hierarchy  of events related to original  stimulus  which elicits  the maladaptive  response for each patient  - Systematic  desensitization  A treatment  to systematically  increase exposure to positive activities,  and thereby improve affect  and corresponding 
cognitions. 
- Behavioral activation  (for depression) Behaviorism  criticized  for ignoring thoughts and emotions  - Cognitive science focuses on how people (and animals)  structure  their experiences,  how they make sense of them, and how 
they relate their current  experiences to past ones that have been stored in memory. 
- Perceiving, recognizing,  conceiving, judging, and reasoning  § A mental process that includes:  - Organized network of previously  accumulated  knowledge  § We actively  interpret  new information  § Schema (cognitive schema)  - Anxious individuals  more likely to attend to threat or danger § Role of attention in psychopathology  - Cognitive science  What is important  is the cognitive process, not the behavior  - Learners are not passive responders to the environmental  stimuli  - Learners are actively  making mental  connections between new information  and old information.  - Learners organize their knowledge into categories  and connected networks.  - Cognitive paradigm  Attends to thoughts, perceptions,  judgments,  self-statements,  and unconscious assumptions  - Incorporates  theory and research on cognitive  processes.  - Change a pattern of thinking  § Changes in thinking  can change feelings,  behaviors, and symptoms  § Cognitive reconstructing  - Cognitive behavior therapy  Initially  developed for depression  - Beck developed a cognitive therapy for depression based on the idea that depressed mood is caused by distortions  In the 
way people perceive life  events 
- Attention, interpretation,  and recall of negative and positive  information  biased in depression  § Information-processing  bias  - Help patients  recognize and change their  negative thought patterns - Beck's cognitive therapy  Focus is on current determinants  of disorder  and less on historical,  childhood antecedents.  - Answer is still  unclear  § Are distorted  thoughts the cause or the result  of psychopathology?  - Evaluating the CBT paradigm  Cognitive paradigms:  Cognitive behavioral  Influence how we respond to problems and challenges  in our environment  - Help us organize our thoughts and actions, both explicitly  and implicitly  - Guide our behavior  - Expressive  § Experiential  § Physiological  § Components:  - Emotions Disturbances in emotion is key to several  disorders  Ex: Flat affect in schizophrenia  (a severe reduction  in emotional  expressiveness)  § Most psychopathology includes disturbances  of one or more component  - Americans value happiness more as someone from another culture,  for example East Asian cultures,  like China, 
value calmness more than happiness 
Western vs. Eastern philosophy  § Ideal effect:  Refers to the kinds of emotional  states that a person ideally wants to feel  - Emotional  dysregulation  Gender, race, culture, ethnicity,  and socioeconomics  status  § Ex: Women more likely to experience  depression than men.  May increase  vulnerability  to psychopathology  § Sociocultural  factors  - Factors that cut across the paradigms  Object relations  theory: Stresses the importance  for long-standing  patterns in close relationships,  particularly  within 
the family. 
§ Attachment  theory: The type of style of an infant's  attachment  to his or her caregiver can set the stage for 
psychological  health or problems  later in life 
§ Stresses  the importance  of interpersonal  relationships  - Interpersonal  psychotherapy  (IPT) focuses upon improving  problematic  interpersonal  relationships - Unsolved grief:  Grief which is either  delayed and experienced long after the loss  I. Role disputes:  The patient and significant  people in his life have different  expectations about their relationships  II. Role transitions:  Depression may occur during life transitions  when a person's role changes and he doesn’t know how 
to cope with the change 
III. Interpersonal  deficits:  This may be an area of focus if the patient  has had problems  with forming  and maintaining   
good quality relationships. 
IV. Four basic problems  recognized by IPT  - Interpersonal   theory  Genetic, neurobiological,  psychological,  and environmental  § Integrative  model that incorporates  multiple  causal factors  - May be biological  or psychological  (gene or cognitive  style)  Underlying predisposition  § Increase one's risk of developing disorder  § Diathesis  - May occur at any point after  conception  Triggering event  Environmental  events  § Death of spouse  Divorce  Marital  separation  Jail term  Death of family  member  Personal injury or illness  Marriage  Fired at wok  Most common stressors  include  § Stress  - Diathesis-Stress  Current paradigms:  The factors that cut across paradigms  (trans-diagnostic)  Chapter 3 The classification  of disorders by symptoms  and signs - Diagnosis  Facilitates  communication  among professionals  about cases and research  - Advances the search for causes and treatments  - Cornerstone of clinical  care  - Helps in specifying appropriate  treatment - Advantages of diagnosis include the following  Inter-rater:  Refers to the degree to which two independent observers  agree on what they have observed.  Test-retest:  Similarity  of scores across repeated test  administrations  or observations Alternate form  reliability:  Similarity  of scored on tests  that are similar  but not identical  Internal  consistency:  Asses whether the items  on a test are related to one another Consistency of measurement  is assessed  by these different  types of reliabilities:  § Reliability:  Consists of measurement  - Just because something  is reliable  does not mean it is always valid  § Ex: The item on the test represent  the entire  range of possible items  the test  should cover  Content validity:  Extent to which a measure  adequately samples  the domain of interest  § If both variable  are measured at the same point in time, the resulting  validity  is referred  to as concurrent validity.  Alternatively,  criterion  validity  can be assessed by evaluating  the ability  of the measure to predict some other 
variable that is measured at some point in the future, often referred to as predictive  validity. 
Criterion  validity:  Evaluated by determining  whether a measure is associated  in an expected way with some other 
measures (the criterion) 
§ Involves correlating  multiple  indirect  measures of the attributes.  a) Construct:  An abstract  concept or inferred  attribute,  such as anxiousness or distorted  cognition.  I. Construct validity:  The degree to which a test measures what it claims,  or purports, to be measuring § In medicine  and statistics,  gold standard  usually refers to a diagnostic  test or benchmark that is the best available 
under reasonable  conditions. 
Other times  it is used to refer to the most accurate test possible  Gold standard  § Extent to which clinicians  agree on the diagnoses  Interrater  reliability  § Validity:  Related to whether a measure measures  what it is supposed to measure.  - The concepts of reliability  and validity  are the cornerstones  of any diagnostic or assessment  procedure.  First published in 1952  § Diagnostic and statistical  manual of mental  disorders (DSM) published by American psychiatric  association - Axis I: Clinical  Disorders  § Axis II: Developmental  disorders  and personality  disorders  § Axis III:  General medical  disorders  § Axis IV: Psychosocial and Environmental  problems  § Axis V: Global assessment  of functioning  scale (GAF scale)  § Multiaxial  classification  system DSM-IV-TR and likely  DSM-5  - In DSM-5 they are likely  to be reduced to one axis for clinical  syndrome and one for psychosocial  and environmental 
problems. 
- Classification  and Diagnosis  Either you are anxious or you are not anxious  Presence/absence  of a disorder  § Categorical  (DSM)  - Describes the degree of an entity that is present  How anxious are you from a scale  of 1 to 10?  Rank on a continuous quantitative  dimension  § Dimensional  (not DSM)  - Categorical  vs. Dimensional  systems of diagnosis  Mental illness  is universal  - The persons availability  of treatment  § Willingness  for one to seek help  § Types of symptoms  experienced  § Risk factors  § Culture can influence:  - The DSM includes 25 culture bound syndromes  in the appendix. Culture bound syndromes  are diagnoses that are likely to 
be seen within specific  regions.
- Ethical and Cultural  considerations  Ex: Depression after the death of a loved one  Should relatively  common reactions  be pathologized? (treated  as psychologically  abnormal or unhealthy)  § Too many diagnoses?  - Refers to the presence of a second diagnoses  § Some argue that this overlap Is a sign that we are dividing syndromes too finely.  45% of people diagnosed with one disorder will meet criteria  for a second disorder  § Comorbidity  - Criticism  of the DSM  Construct validity  is of highest concern - For most disorders,  there is no lab test available  to diagnose with certainty    § Diagnoses are constructs:  - Possible etiological  causes (past)  § Clinical  characteristics  (current)  § Predict treatment  response (future)  § Strong constructs validity  predicts  wide range of characteristics  - Construct validity  of diagnostic  categories  Treated differently  by others  § Difficulty  finding a job  § Stigma against  mental illness  - The disorder does not define the person  § She is an individual  with schizophrenia,  not a "schizophrenic"  § Categories do not capture the uniqueness  of a person  - Relevant information  may be overlooked  § Classification  may emphasize  trivial  similarities  - Criticisms  of classification  Described client's problem  § Determined causes of the problem  § Arrived at diagnoses  § Develop a treatment  strategy  § Monitor treatment  progress  § Conducting valid research  § Techniques employed to"  - Interviews  § Personality  inventories  § Intelligence  tests  § Ideal assessment  involves multiple  measures and methods  - Psychological  assessment  In these interviews,  the interviewer  pays close attention  to how the patient  answers the questions, how they don’t.  - They check to see if the response is accompanied by appropriate  emotion  - Informal  / less structured  interviews  - Empathy and accepting attitude  is very important  - Reliability  lower than for a structured  interview  - Clinical  interviews  All interviewers  ask the same questions  in a predetermined  order  - Very structured  - Good interrater  reliability  for most diagnostic  categories § Most symptoms  are rated on a three-point  scale  § Structured  clinical  interview for Axis I of DMS (SCID)  - Structured  interview  Yields profile of psychological functioning  Specific subscales  to detect lying and faking  Personality  tests  § Asses current  mental ability  Wechsler adult intelligence  scale (WAIS) ® Wechsler intelligence  scale for children (WISC)  ® Wechsler preschool  and primary scale for children, 3rd ed. (WPPSI-III)  ® Wechsler scales  Information  (general  knowledge)  Comprehension:  asks questions  designed to measure practical  knowledge and understanding of social rules and 
concepts 
Arithmetic:  requires solving series  of arithmetic  problems.  The examinee  must solve problems mentally,  without 
the use of pencil or paper, and respond orally within a time  limit. 
Used to predict  performance, diagnose learning  disabilities  or intellectual  developmental  disorder (mental 
retardation),  identify gifted  children. 
® Standord-Binet  Intelligence  tests  § The two most common psychological  tests are  - Asses personality  traits  and psychopathology  Primarily  intended to test people who are suspected of having mental  health or other clinical  issues  `Scale 1 - Hypochondriasis:  This scale  was designed to asses a neurotic concern over bodily functioning. 
Items  on this  scale include somatic  symptoms and physical  well being. 
® Scale 2 - Depression: This scale was originally  designed to identify  depression, characterized  by poor 
morale, lack of hope in future, and a general dissatisfaction  with one's own life situation 
® Scale 3 -  Hysteria:  The third  scale was originally  designed to identify  those who display hysteria  in 
stressful  situations.   
® Scale 4 - Psychopathic disorder:  Originally  developed to identify  psychopathic patients:  Originally 
developed to identify  psychopathic patients,  this scale measures  social deviation,  lack of acceptance of 
authority,  and morality.  Can be thought of as a scale of disobedience 
® Scale 5 - Masculinity/Femininity:  This scale was designed by the original  author's to identify  homosexual 
tendencies, but was found to be largely ineffective. 
® Scale 6 - Paranoia: This scale was originally  developed to Identify  patients  with paranoid symptoms  such 
as suspiciousness,  feelings  of persecution,  grandiose self-concepts,  excessive sensitivity,  and rigid 
attitudes. 
® Scale 7 - Psychasthenia:  This diagnostic  is no longer used today and the symptoms  described on this  scale 
are more reflective  of obsessive-compulsive  disorder. Was originally  used to measure  excessive doubts, 
compulsions,  obsessions etc.. 
® Scale 8 - Schizophrenia:  This scale was originally  developed to identify schizophrenic  patients  and reflects 
a wide variety  of areas including bizarre  thought processes and peculiar perceptions,  social  alienation,  poor 
familial  relationships,  difficulties  in concentration  and impulse  control, lack of deep interests,  disturbing 
questions of self-worth and self-identity,  and sexual difficulties.
® Scale 9 - Hypomania: This scale was developed to identify characteristics  of hypomania such as elevated 
mood, accelerated  speech and motor activity,  irritability,  flight  of ideas, and brief periods of depression 
® Scale 0 - Social introversion:  This scale was developed later than the other nine scales, its designed to 
assess a person's tendency to withdraw from social contacts 
® MMPI Scales  ? Scale - Cannot say (MMPI/MMPI-2).  A tally of omitted  items. High scores may be due to 
obsessiveness,  defensiveness,  difficulty  in reading, confusion, hostility,  or paranoia. Twenty or more 
unanswered should be considered significant 
I. Lie scales?  ® K Scale - Defensiveness.  K is a subtle and valuable correction  for defensiveness.  I. Assumes psychopathology. Is someone with a history  of psychopathology problems  scores high, then 
they are being defensive 
II. K scale  ® F scale - Infrequency. Very high possible random, exaggerated,  or mis-scored  profile.  I. Very high scores commonly  found with psychotic patients.  II. High scores best measure of overall  psychopathology, resentment,  acting out, and moodiness.  III. F scale  ® Validity scales  of MMPI  Most common test is the Minnesota  multiphasic  personality  test  § Personality  inventory:  The person is asked to complete a self-report  questionnaire  indicating  whether statements  assessing 
habitual tendencies  apply to him or her. 
- Psychological  test  The subjects perceptions  of inkblots  are recorded and then analyzed using psychological  interpretation    Rorschach inkblot  test  § It is known as the picture interpretation  technique  because it uses a series of provocative yet ambiguous pictures 
and the subject is asked to tell  a story
They are asked to tell  as dramatic  a story as they can for each picture.  What has led up to the event shown I. What is happening at the moment  II. What the characters  are feeling  and thinking  III. What the outcome of the story was  IV. Most of the common things asked are  Thematic apperception  test (TAT)  § Projective  tests  - Responses to ambiguous stimuli  reflect  unconscious processes § Projective  hypothesis  - Psychological  tests  Focus on aspects of environment  § Characteristic  of the person  § Frequency and form of problematic  behaviors  § Consequences of problem behaviors  § Behavioral assessments  are often conducted in lab setting  - Observe behavior as it occurs  - Antecedents and consequences  § Sequence of behavior divided into segments  - Ex: moods, stressful  evets, thoughts, etc…  Self-monitoring:  individuals  observe and record their  own behavior  § Involves the collection  of data in real time  as opposed to the more usual methods of having people reflect back 
over some time  period and report  on recently experienced  thoughts, moods, or stressors. 
Ecological momentary  assessment  (EMA)  § Self observation - Used to help plan treatment  targets  § Format often similar  to personality  test  § Identifies  negative  thought patterns  Dysfunctional  attitude  scale (DAS)  § Cognitive-style  questionnaires  - Behavioral & cognitive assessment  Helps to asses structural  brain abnormalities  A moving beam of x-rays passes a horizontal  cross section of the person's brain, scanning it through 360 
degrees; the moving x-ray detector  on the other side measures  the amount of radioactivity  that penetrates, 
detecting  subtle differences  in tissue  density. 
Computerized  axial tomography (CAT scan or CT) § Superior to the CAT scan because it gives a picture of much higher quality  and does not use even the smallest 
amount of radiation  that the CAT scan uses . 
The person is placed inside a large, circular  magnet, which causes the hydrogen atoms In the body to move. 
When the magnetic force is turned off, the atoms return to their original  positions,  which produces an 
electromagnetic  signal 
Magnetic resonance imaging  (MRI)  § Brain imaging  - Postmortem  studies  (Alzheimer's)  - Metabolite  levels:  Byproduct so neurotransmitter  breakdown found in urine, blood serum, or cerebral  fluid.  § May not reflect  the actual level of neurotransmitter  § Metabolite  assays  - Studies how brain abnormalities  affect  thinking, feeling,  and behavior  § Neuropsychologist  - Reveal performance  deficits  that can indicate areas of brain malfunction  § Tactile performance  test-time  Tactile performance  test-memory  Speech sounds perception test  Halstead-Reitan  battery  § Assesses motor skills,  tactile  and kinesthetic  skills,  verbal and spatial  skills,  expressive and receptive  speech  Luria-Nebraska battery  § Measures developed for one culture or ethnic group may not be valid or reliable  for another  Can lead to exaggerating or minimizing  psychological problems  Increase graduate student sensitivity  to cultural  issues  ® Strategies  to avoid the bias:  Cultural bias in assessment  § Make allowances for variations  in the use of personal space  Respectful of cultural  variations  of touch (hugging, kiss introductions,  etc…)  Adjust the communication  style  Expand roles and practices  as needed  Cultural responsiveness  § Neuropsychological  tests  - Neurobiological  Assessment Diagnosis & assessment  Chapter 4  The systematic  pursuit  of knowledge through observation    § Scientist  gather data to test theories  § Science: comes from the latin scire, "to know" - Means that a hypothesis is testable  by empirical  experiments,  and conforms  to the standard of scientific  method  A good theory is falsifiable § Theory: a set of propositions  meant to explain a class of observations  - Hypothesis: specific  predictions  about what will occur if a theory is correct  - Science and scientific  methods  Great source of hypothesis  § Can provide information  about novel cases or procedures  § Can disconfirm  a relationship  that was believed to be universal  § Cannot provide causal evidence because cannot rule out alternative  hypothesis  § Case study: collection  of detailed biographical  information  - May be biased by observer's theoretical  views  § Widely used because we cannot manipulate  many risk variables  or diagnosis  in psychopathology research  in humans  § Cannot determine  causality  because of the directionality  and third variable  problems  § Correlation:  Study of the relationship  between two or more variables;  measured as they exist in nature  - Best method for determining  causal relationships  § Experiment:  includes a manipulated  independent variable, a dependent variable,  preferably at least one control  group, and 
random assignment  group. 
- Detailed biographical  description  of an individual  § Rich description,  especially  helpful  for rare disorders  Generate hypothesis  Disprove hypothesis  Usefulness § Paradigm may influence observations  Cannot rule out alternative  explanations  Cannot prove hypothesis  Limitations  § Case study  - Ex: Do people who have more stress  have more headaches?  Studies questions of the form "Do variable X and variable Y vary together?" § Variables are measured but not manipulated  § Cannot determine  cause or effect  § The correlation  method  - Varies from -1.0 to +1.0 § Strength:  the high the absolute value, the stronger the relationship § Positive:  Higher scores on variable  X associated  with high score of variable  Y  Negative: Higher scores on variable  X associated with lower scores on variable  Y  Direction  § Large samples  increase likelihood  of significance  ® Can be influenced by number of participants  Statistical  significance § Is the association  meaningful  as well as statistically  significant?  Whether a relationship  between variables  is large enough to matter  Clinical  significance  § Correlation  does not imply causality  We do not know which variable  may cause the other  ® Variable X may cause variable Y  ® Variable Y may cause variable X  ® There may even be a third variable  not taken into account  ® Directionality  problem  Problems of causality  § Cross - sectional:  Causes and effects  are measured at the same point in time.  Follow large population  over time  ® High risk method: With this approach, only people who have the highest risk of developing a disorder  are 
included 
® Longitudinal:  examines whether causes are present  before disorder  develops  Longitudinal  vs. Cross-sectional  design  § Measuring correlation  - Study of the distribution  of disorders  in a population and possible  correlations  § Prevalence:  The proportion  of people with the disorder either  currently  or during their lifetime  § Incidence:  The proportion  of people who develop new cases of the disorder in a period of time, usually a year  § Increased risk of disease or infection  Ex: Obesity is a risk factor for high blood pressure  Risk factors:  Variables  that are related  to the likelihood  of developing the disorder  § Epidemiological  research  - Methods in psychopathology  Family method  § Twin method  § Adoptees method  § 50% shared genes  First degree relatives  (parents,  children, siblings)  § 25% shared genes  Second degree relatives  (aunts, uncles, grandparents)  § Sample of individuals  who psychopathology  Index cases/probands  § Family studies  - 100% shared genes  Monozygotic (MZ)/ Identical  twins  § 50% shared genes  Dizygotic (DZ)/ Fraternal  twins  § Similarity  of diagnosis  Concordance  § Twin studies  - In identical  twins, if one has schizophrenia,  the other has a 50% chance of getting it as well  § In fraternal  twins, it drops to 15%  § Schizophrenia twin method  - Methods to determine  genetic predisposition  (concordance)  to psychopathology  Adoption studies:  Study adoptees who have biological  parents  with psychopathology  - Cross-fostering:  Study of adoptees who have adoptive parents with psychopathology  - Behavioral genetics  Association studies:  Examine the relationship  between a specific  allele and a trait  or behavior in the population  - Molecular  genetics  Provides information  on causal relationships  - Hypothesis  - Null hypothesis:  No difference  between groups  - Random assignment  § Independent variable (manipulated)  § Dependent variable  (measured),  expected to vary with conditions  of the independent  variable.  § Involves:  - Can evaluate treatment  effectiveness  - Experimental  effect:  Differences between conditions  on the dependent variable  - Internal  validity:  Extent to which experimental  effect is due to independent variable  - Would results apply to others besides  the study participants?  § External validity:  Extent to which results  generalize beyond the study  - Treatment  manuals  § Placebo  Control group  § Double blind procedure  § Empirically  supported  treatments  - Exclusion of diverse populations  § Sample composition  - Efficacy:  Whether a treatment  works under the purest of conditions  § Effectiveness:  How well the treatment  works in the real world  § Efficacy and effectiveness  - Experiments  are not always possible  in psychopathology due to ethical  or practical  constraints  § Induce temporary  symptoms  College students who tend to be anxious or depressed  ® Recruit participants  with similarities  to diagnosable disorders  Animal research  Create or observe a related phenomenon - analogue - in the lab to allow more intensive  study  § Analogue experiment  - The experiment  Research methods in the study of psychopathology Abnormal Psychology Friday, February 3, 2017 5:07 PM
background image Exam 1 Study Guide  Introduction  & Historical  preview  Chapter 1  The study of mental disorders  It studies the nature, development, & treatment  of psychological disorders  Avoid preconceived notions  - Maintain  objectivity  - Reduce stigma  - Challenges to this  study include  Psychopathology  Emotional  pain & suffering  - Personal distress  Ex: Poor work performance  or serious  fight with ones spouse § Impairment  in some important  area of life  - Disability  Makes others uncomfortable  or causes problems  - Violation of social norms  The disorder occurs within the individual  - It involves clinically  proven significant  difficulties  in thinking,  feeling, or behaving  - It involves dysfunction in processes that support mental  functioning  - It is not a culturally  specific  reaction  to an event  - It is not mainly a result  of a problem  with society or social deviance  - When thinking of defining a mental  disorder one must also take these things into consideration:  Defining mental disorder  Distinguishing  label is applied  I. Label refers  to undesirable  attributes  II. People with the label  are seen as different  III. People with the label  are discriminated  against  IV. The four characteristics  of a stigma  are:  Stigma  Possession by evil being or spirits  / Exorcism  - Early Demonology  Mental disturbances  have natural  causes, they are not supernatural,  instead  they are due to problems  in the brain § Mania  I. Melancholia  II. Phrenitis  (Brain fever)  III. Three categories  of mental  disorders  § Blood  I. Black bile  II. Yellow bile  III. Phlegm IV. Normal brain functioning depend on balance of four humors § Hippocrates (5th century BC)  - Early Biological Explanations  Torture sometimes  led to delusional  sounding confessions  - Historians  have concluded that many of the accused were mentally  ill (little  support was found for this conclusion)  - Witches (13th century AD)  They were trials  held to determine  sanity   - Began in 13th century England  - Municipal  authorities  assumed responsibility  for care of mentally  ill  - "Lunacy" attributes  insanity  to misalignment  of moon (luna) and the stars  - Lunacy trials  They were established  for the care and confinement  of the mentally  ill in 15th century AD  - The institute  was called St. Mary of Bethlehem  § Wealthy people would pay to look at the insane  § One of the first  mental  institutions  was founded in 1243  - Treatment  in asylums  was either  non-existent  or harmful  to the patients  - promoted public health by advocating  for personal hygiene and a clean environment § Pioneered humanitarian  treatment  § Benjamin Rush - French physician  who was instrumental  in the development  of a more humane approach to the custody and care of 
psychiatric  patients.  This is referred  to as moral  therapy 
§ He also made contributions  to the classification  of mental  disorders and has been described by some as "father of 
modern psychiatry" 
§ Philippe Pinel (20 April 1745-25 October 1826) - Patients  engaged in calming  and purposeful activities    Talked with attendants  Small, privately  funded, humanitarian  hospitals  § Moral treatment - Asylums  Brief history of Psychopathology  Crusader for pioneers  and mentally  ill  - Urged improvement  of institutions  - Worked to establish  32 new, public  hospitals  - Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) (American  activists)  Psychological  (delusions and grandeur)  I. Physical symptoms  (progressive  paralysis)  II. Degenerative disorder  with psychological  symptoms  and physical symptoms  - It is a neuropsychiatric  disorder that  affects the brain  - Was originally  considered a psychiatric  disorder  when it was scientifically  identified  around the 19th century.  - Patient usually  presented with psychotic  symptoms  of sudden and often dramatic  onset.  - Since general paresis had biological  cause, other mental illness  might also have biological  causes  Biological  causes of psychopathology gained credibility  By mid-1800s it was known that general  paresis and syphilis  occurred together in some patients,  in 1905 the biological 
causes of syphilis  were found 
- General Paresis (syphilis)  Parents jointly  contribute  one half  I. Grandparents one quarter II. Great - grandparents one eighth….  Etc  III. His law states  that our heritage  is, on average, constituted  from that of our ancestors  according to the following proportions:  - Galton's (1822-1911) work lead to notion that mental  illness  can be inherited  Promotion  of enforced sterilization  to eliminate  undesirable  characteristics  from the population  - Many state  laws required mentally  ill  to be sterilized  - Eugenics The evolution of Contemporary thought Sakel (1930's)  - Insulin-coma  therapy  1938  - Used for schizophrenic  patients  § Induced epileptic  seizures with electric  shock  - Did NOT help them at all  - Does help severe depression  - Electroconvulsive  Therapy (ECT)  Moniz (1935)  - Often used to control violent  behaviors;  led to listlessness,  apathy, and loss of cognitive abilities  - Prefrontal  lobotomy  Early Biological treatments  Treated patients  with hysteria  - Using "animal magnetism"  - Early practitioner  of hypnosis  - Student: Charcot  - Mesmer (1734-1815)  Medical doctor (1825-1893)  - His support legitimizes  hypnosis as treatment  for hysteria  - Charcot  Anna O. was the pseudonym of a patient of Josef Breuer, who published her case study in his book "Studies on 
Hysteria", written in collaboration  with Sigmund Freud. 
§ Her real name was Bertha Pappenheim (1859-1936)  § She was an Austrian-Jewish  feminist  and the founder of the League of Jewish Women.  § Despite the Breuer and Freud's claims,  Anna O did NOT get better  from her treatment  with Breuer and was 
hospitalized  several  times afterward. 
§ She appeared to have neurological  problems  (perhaps epilepsy)  § Used hypnosis to facilitate  catharsis  in Anna O.  - Release of emotional  tension triggered  by reliving  and talking about event.  § Cathartic  method - Breuer (1842-1925)  Breuer and Freud jointly  published, "Studies in Hysteria" in 1895, which serves as the basis for Freud's theory. - Human behavior determined  by unconscious forces  § Psychopathology results  from conflicts  among these unconscious forces  § Freudian or Psychoanalytic  theory  - Composed of biological,  instinctual  drives  I. Innate (born with it)  II. Seeks immediate,  indiscriminant  gratification III. Source of mental energy  IV. Obeys the pleasure  principal:  pleasure is good, and nothing else matters.  V. Libido: biological  force (energy of ID)  VI. Thanatos: The death instinct  VII. Gratifying  urges returns  body to homeostasis  VIII. ID (Primal  desires/Basic  nature) § Organized, rational, reality-oriented  system  I. Develops first  2 years of life as infant experiences  reality  II. Holds id in check until  suitable object  is found  III. Helps id achieve gratification  within confines of reality  IV. Prevents id drives  from violating superego principles  V. Obeys the reality  principle:  Behavior takes into account the external  world  VI. Ego (Reason/Self control) § Learned  I. Inhibits  ("breaks") id urges  II. Strives for perfection  III. "Irrational"  operates on extremes good or bad  IV. Ego ideals - The person we'd like to be  V. Developed through rewards  VI. Conscience - right and wrong  VII. Developed though punishment  VIII. Formed around age 5 via Oedipal complex  resolution  IX. Superego (The quest for perfection)  § Freud's Structural  Model  - Freud (1856-1939) The evolution of contemporary thought Ego generates strategies  to protect itself  from  anxiety  § Defense mechanisms:  Psychological  maneuvers used to manage stress & anxiety  Conflict generates  anxiety  - Id, Ego, & Superego continually  in conflict  Repression: Keeping unacceptable impulses  or wishes from conscious awareness  - Denial: Not accepting a painful  reality  into conscious awareness  - Projection:  Attributing  to someone else one's own unacceptable  thoughts or feelings - Displacement:  Redirecting  emotional  responses from their  real target to someone else  - Reaction formation:  Converting an unacceptable feeling into its opposite  - Regression: Retreating  to the behavioral  patterns of an earlier  stage of development   - Rationalize:  Offering acceptable  reasons for an unacceptable action or attitude  - Sublimation:  Converting unacceptable aggressive  or sexual impulses  into socially valued behaviors  - Selected defense mechanisms  Defense Mechanisms  Understand early-childhood  experiences,  particularly  key (parental)  relationships  - Understand patterns in current relationships  - Goals of psychoanalytic therapy or psychoanalysis  The patient tries  to say whatever comes to mind without censoring  anything  Free Association  - Transference is a phenomenon characterized  by unconscious redirection  of feelings  from one person to another 
(patient  to therapist) 
The patient responds to the analyst  in ways that the patient  has previously  responded to other important  figures  in his 
or her life, and the analyst helps the patient  understand and interpret  these responses 
Analysis of transference  - The Liberation from  the conflict  (effects  of the unconscious material)  is achieved through bringing this material  into 
the conscious mind 
The analysts points out to the patient  the meaning of certain  of the patient's  behaviors  Interpretation  - Psychoanalytic  Techniques  Psychoanalytic  Therapy  Analytical  psychology  - Archetypes  According to Jungian Psychoanalysis,  the Great Mother archetype symbolizes  creativity,  birth,  fertility,  sexual 
union and nurturing.  She is a creative force not only for life, but also for art and ideas 
The mother figure  Collective  unconscious  - Jung (1875-1961) Childhood experiences help shape adult personality  - There are unconscious influences  on behavior  - Continuing influences  of Freud and his followers  Neo-Freudians  Focus on observable behavior  Emphasis on learning  rather than thinking  or innate tendencies  Behaviorism  - Classical  conditioning  Operant conditioning  Modeling  Three types of learning  - John Watson (1878-1958) In behaviorist  terms,  the dog's salivation  is known as an unconditioned  response ( a stimulus- response connection that 
required no learning) 
- Unconditioned stimulus  (Food) > Unconditioned response (salivation)  In behaviorist  terms  it is written  as:  - Pavlov showed the existence of the unconditioned  response by presenting a dog with a bowl of food and then measuring  its 
salivary  secretions 
- Pavlovian conditioning  (Pavlov's dogs)  Meat powder (automatically  elicits  salivation)  Unconditioned stimulus  (USC) - Salivation  (automatic  response to meat powder)  Unconditioned response (UR) - Initial  ringing of bell (does not automatically  elicit  salivation)  Neutral stimulus  (NS) - After pairing the NS and the UCS, the NS becomes a CS (bell  now automatically  elicits  salivation)  Conditioned stimulus  (CS) - Salivation  (automatic  response to bell)  Condition response (CR)  - CS (bell) not followed by USC (meat powder) causes gradual disappearance  of CR (salivation)  Extinction  - Discovered by Pavlov (1849-1936)  Principle  of reinforcement  Behaviors followed by pleasant stimuli  are strengthened  Positive  reinforcement  Behaviors that terminate  negative stimulus  are strengthened  Negative reinforcement  B.F Skinner (1904-1990)  - Operant Conditioning;  behavior that operates  on the environment  Can occur without reinforcement  Learning by watching and imitating  others behaviors  - Modeling reduced children's fear of dogs  Bandura & Menlove (1968)  - Modeling  Used to treat  phobias  Combines deep muscle relaxation  and gradual exposure to the feared condition  or object  Usually starts with minimal  anxiety producing condition  and gradually progresses  to more feared Systematic  desensitization  (imagine  what you fear while in deep relaxation) - Rewarding a behavior only occasionally  more effective  than continuous schedules of reinforcement  Intermittent  reinforcement  - Behavior Therapy or Behavior modification  The evolution of contemporary thought  How we think or appraise a situation  influences  our feelings and behaviors  - Limitations  of behavior therapy  Emphasizes how people think about themselves  and their  experiences can be a major  determinant  of psychopathology  - Focus on understanding  maladaptive  thoughts  - Change cognitions to change feelings  and behaviors  - Cognitive therapy  Importance  of cognitions  Chapter 2 A paradigm is a set of basic assumptions  that influence how you think about data  - Paradigms in psychopathology  Aim for objectivity  Goal: Study abnormal behavior scientifically.  - We can never really be objective;  subjective  factors  interfere Perspective  or conceptual framework  from within which a scientist  operates  Paradigm (Thomas Kuhn)  - Notion of a paradigm  Current Paradigms of psychopathology  Behavioral genetics  - Molecular  genetics  - Gene-environment  interactions  - Genetic paradigm  The Genetic paradigm  Carriers of genetic information  - Ex: relationships,  culture  Impacted by environment  influences  - Relationship  between genes and environment  is bidirectional  - Genes  Proteins influence  whether the action of a specific gene will occur  - Gene expression  Multiple  gene pairs vs. single gene  - A number of gene pairs combine their influences  to create a single (phenotypic)  trait  - Polygenic transmission  Extent to which variability  In behavior is due to genetic factors  - It estimates  range from 0.0 to 1.0, the higher the number, the greater the heritability  - Heritability  Heredity plays a role in most behavior  Ex: siblings  who are raised in the same environment,  by the same parents,  go to the same school, etc…  Events and experiences that family  members  have in common  - Shared environment  Ex: one sibling  might have been in a car accident but not the other Events and experiences that are unique to each family  member  - Nonshared environment  Environmental  effects  Study of the degree to which genes and environmental  factors  influence behavior  Genetic material  by an individual  - They are unobservable  - Consists of inherited genes  Genotype: The total  genetic makeup of a person  - Genotypes (unobservable)  Observable expression of the genes  Expressed genetic material  - Ex: Green eyes  Observable behavior or characteristics  - Depends on interaction  of genotype and environment  - Phenotype (observable)  Behavior genetics  The field of biology and genetics  that studies the structure  and function of genes at a molecular  level  *Remember APOE, allele 4 associated  with AD Different  in DNA sequence on a gene occurring in a population Alleles  - Difference in DNA sequence on a gene occurring  in a population  Polymorphism  - Refers to differences  between people In a single nucleotide  in the DNA sequence of a particular  gene.  One area of interest  in the study of gene sequence involves identifying  what are called single nucleotide  polymorphisms  or 
SNPs 
- A CNV can be present in a single gene or multiple  genes. The name refers  to an abnormal  copy of one or more 
sections  of DNA within the gene(s).
Another area of interest  is the study of differences  between people in gene culture,  including the identification  of what are
called copy number variations  (CNVs) 
- Identifies  particular  genes and their  functions  Molecular  genetics  An example would be if a person has gene XYZ, he or she might respond to a snake bite by developing a fear of snakes. 
Another person without gene XYZ would not have developed a fear of snakes after  being bitten. 
- Another example  would  be depression  - One's response to a specific  environmental  event is influenced by genes Researchers had found that those with either the short-short  allele  or the short-long  allele combinations  of the 5-HTT 
gene  
This shows how it was a combination  of the genes and the environment.  I. and  were maltreated  as children were most  likely to have major depressive disorder  as adults than either those people 
who had the gene combination  but where not maltreated  as children  or those who had the long-long allele  but where 
also maltreated  as children. 
This gene has a polymorphism  such that some people have two short alleles  (short-short),  some have two long alleles (long-
long) and some have one short one long (long-short). 
- Serotonin transporter  gene (5-HTT)  The study of the phenotypic trait  variations  caused by environmental  factors  that switch genes on and off - Epigenetics  Ex: A genetic risk for alcohol use disorder may predispose persons to life events that put them in high risk situations 
for alcohol use such as being in trouble with the law. 
The basic idea is that genes may predispose us to seek out certain  environments  that then increase  our risk to developing a 
particular  disorder. 
- Reciprocal gene-environment  interactions  Gene-Environment  Interaction Examines the contribution  of brain structure  and function to psychopathology  - The neuroscience paradigm  holds that mental  disorders  are linked to aberrant processes in the brain.  Neurons and neurotransmitters  I. Brain structure and function  II. Neuroendocrine system III. Three major  components are:  Cell body  I. Dendrites  II. Axons  III. Terminal  buttons  IV. Four major parts  include:  Neurons: cells of the nervous system  - Nerve impulse:  Occurs when a neuron is appropriately  stimulated  at its cell body or through its dendrites.  It travels down 
the axon to the terminal  endings. 
- Synapse: Between the terminal  endings of the sending axon and the cell membrane of the receiving  neuron.  - Neurons   Chemicals that allow neurons to send a signal across the synapse to another neuron  - Excitatory:  Leading to the creation  of a nerve impulse  in the postsynaptic  neuron  I. Inhibitory:  Making the postsynaptic  cell less likely to create a nerve impulse.  II. Receptor sites on postsynaptic  neuron absorb neurotransmitter  which can either  be:  - Reuptake: Reabsorption of leftover  neurotransmitter  by presynaptic  neuron  - Implicated  In depression, mania, and schizophrenia  Serotonin and dopamine  Implicated  in anxiety and other stress-related  disorders  Norepinephrine  Inhibits  nerve impulses  Implicated  in anxiety  Gamma-aminobutyric  acid (GABA)  Several key neurotransmitters  are:  - Excessive or inadequate levels  Insufficient  reuptake  Excessive number or hypersensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  Possible mechanisms:  - Once they are released, they play a role in adjusting the sensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  to dopamine, 
norepinephrine,  or serotonin. 
When a cell has been firing more frequently,  this receptor  releases second messengers.  - Ex: A serotonin agonist is a drug that  stimulates  serotonin receptors  to produce the same effects  as serotonin  does 
naturally. 
Agonist: A drug that stimulates  a particular  neurotransmitter's  receptors.  - Ex: Many drugs used to treat schizophrenia  are dopamine antagonists  that work by blocking dopamine receptors.  Antagonist:  A drug that works on a neurotransmitter's  receptors to dampen the activity  of that neurotransmitter  - Neurotransmitter  HPA axis involved in stress  - Hypothalamus triggers  release of corticotrophin-releasing  hormone (CRF)  - Pituitary  gland releases adrenocorticotropic  hormone (ACTH) - Adrenal cortex triggers  release  of cortisol,  the stress hormone  - The HPA axis of the neuroendocrine  system  Antidepressants  Antipsychotics  Benzodiazepines  Psychoactive drugs alter neurotransmitter  activity  - A neuroscience view does not preclude psychological  interventions  - Neuroscience approaches to treatment  Reductionism:  View that behavior can best be understood by reducing it to its  basic biological  components  - Evaluating the neuroscience paradigm  Current paradigms:  Neuroscience  Roots in learning principles  and cognitive  science  Getting attention  - Escape or avoidance  - Sensory stimulation  - Access to desirable objects  or events  - Behavior is reinforced  by consequences such as:  Strengthens responses  - Ex: Giving a dog a treat after she sits.  Presents something  pleasant after  a behavior is emitted  - Positive  reinforcement  All behavior is determined  by our reinforcement  history  - B.F Skinner  Ex: Time- out, when a child behaves incorrectly  and as a consequence is sent for a period of time to a location  with no 
positive  reinforcement. 
- In order to alter  behavior, one must modify consequences  Relaxation plus imagined exposure  - Important  treatment  for anxiety disorders  - Driving to clinic  1. Entering treatment  room  2. Seeing clinic nurse  3. Train patient to associate alternative  response (ex: deep muscle relaxation)  with these events.  § Construct hierarchy  of events related to original  stimulus  which elicits  the maladaptive  response for each patient  - Systematic  desensitization  A treatment  to systematically  increase exposure to positive activities,  and thereby improve affect  and corresponding 
cognitions. 
- Behavioral activation  (for depression) Behaviorism  criticized  for ignoring thoughts and emotions  - Cognitive science focuses on how people (and animals)  structure  their experiences,  how they make sense of them, and how 
they relate their current  experiences to past ones that have been stored in memory. 
- Perceiving, recognizing,  conceiving, judging, and reasoning  § A mental process that includes:  - Organized network of previously  accumulated  knowledge  § We actively  interpret  new information  § Schema (cognitive schema)  - Anxious individuals  more likely to attend to threat or danger § Role of attention in psychopathology  - Cognitive science  What is important  is the cognitive process, not the behavior  - Learners are not passive responders to the environmental  stimuli  - Learners are actively  making mental  connections between new information  and old information.  - Learners organize their knowledge into categories  and connected networks.  - Cognitive paradigm  Attends to thoughts, perceptions,  judgments,  self-statements,  and unconscious assumptions  - Incorporates  theory and research on cognitive  processes.  - Change a pattern of thinking  § Changes in thinking  can change feelings,  behaviors, and symptoms  § Cognitive reconstructing  - Cognitive behavior therapy  Initially  developed for depression  - Beck developed a cognitive therapy for depression based on the idea that depressed mood is caused by distortions  In the 
way people perceive life  events 
- Attention, interpretation,  and recall of negative and positive  information  biased in depression  § Information-processing  bias  - Help patients  recognize and change their  negative thought patterns - Beck's cognitive therapy  Focus is on current determinants  of disorder  and less on historical,  childhood antecedents.  - Answer is still  unclear  § Are distorted  thoughts the cause or the result  of psychopathology?  - Evaluating the CBT paradigm  Cognitive paradigms:  Cognitive behavioral  Influence how we respond to problems and challenges  in our environment  - Help us organize our thoughts and actions, both explicitly  and implicitly  - Guide our behavior  - Expressive  § Experiential  § Physiological  § Components:  - Emotions Disturbances in emotion is key to several  disorders  Ex: Flat affect in schizophrenia  (a severe reduction  in emotional  expressiveness)  § Most psychopathology includes disturbances  of one or more component  - Americans value happiness more as someone from another culture,  for example East Asian cultures,  like China, 
value calmness more than happiness 
Western vs. Eastern philosophy  § Ideal effect:  Refers to the kinds of emotional  states that a person ideally wants to feel  - Emotional  dysregulation  Gender, race, culture, ethnicity,  and socioeconomics  status  § Ex: Women more likely to experience  depression than men.  May increase  vulnerability  to psychopathology  § Sociocultural  factors  - Factors that cut across the paradigms  Object relations  theory: Stresses the importance  for long-standing  patterns in close relationships,  particularly  within 
the family. 
§ Attachment  theory: The type of style of an infant's  attachment  to his or her caregiver can set the stage for 
psychological  health or problems  later in life 
§ Stresses  the importance  of interpersonal  relationships  - Interpersonal  psychotherapy  (IPT) focuses upon improving  problematic  interpersonal  relationships - Unsolved grief:  Grief which is either  delayed and experienced long after the loss  I. Role disputes:  The patient and significant  people in his life have different  expectations about their relationships  II. Role transitions:  Depression may occur during life transitions  when a person's role changes and he doesn’t know how 
to cope with the change 
III. Interpersonal  deficits:  This may be an area of focus if the patient  has had problems  with forming  and maintaining   
good quality relationships. 
IV. Four basic problems  recognized by IPT  - Interpersonal   theory  Genetic, neurobiological,  psychological,  and environmental  § Integrative  model that incorporates  multiple  causal factors  - May be biological  or psychological  (gene or cognitive  style)  Underlying predisposition  § Increase one's risk of developing disorder  § Diathesis  - May occur at any point after  conception  Triggering event  Environmental  events  § Death of spouse  Divorce  Marital  separation  Jail term  Death of family  member  Personal injury or illness  Marriage  Fired at wok  Most common stressors  include  § Stress  - Diathesis-Stress  Current paradigms:  The factors that cut across paradigms  (trans-diagnostic)  Chapter 3 The classification  of disorders by symptoms  and signs - Diagnosis  Facilitates  communication  among professionals  about cases and research  - Advances the search for causes and treatments  - Cornerstone of clinical  care  - Helps in specifying appropriate  treatment - Advantages of diagnosis include the following  Inter-rater:  Refers to the degree to which two independent observers  agree on what they have observed.  Test-retest:  Similarity  of scores across repeated test  administrations  or observations Alternate form  reliability:  Similarity  of scored on tests  that are similar  but not identical  Internal  consistency:  Asses whether the items  on a test are related to one another Consistency of measurement  is assessed  by these different  types of reliabilities:  § Reliability:  Consists of measurement  - Just because something  is reliable  does not mean it is always valid  § Ex: The item on the test represent  the entire  range of possible items  the test  should cover  Content validity:  Extent to which a measure  adequately samples  the domain of interest  § If both variable  are measured at the same point in time, the resulting  validity  is referred  to as concurrent validity.  Alternatively,  criterion  validity  can be assessed by evaluating  the ability  of the measure to predict some other 
variable that is measured at some point in the future, often referred to as predictive  validity. 
Criterion  validity:  Evaluated by determining  whether a measure is associated  in an expected way with some other 
measures (the criterion) 
§ Involves correlating  multiple  indirect  measures of the attributes.  a) Construct:  An abstract  concept or inferred  attribute,  such as anxiousness or distorted  cognition.  I. Construct validity:  The degree to which a test measures what it claims,  or purports, to be measuring § In medicine  and statistics,  gold standard  usually refers to a diagnostic  test or benchmark that is the best available 
under reasonable  conditions. 
Other times  it is used to refer to the most accurate test possible  Gold standard  § Extent to which clinicians  agree on the diagnoses  Interrater  reliability  § Validity:  Related to whether a measure measures  what it is supposed to measure.  - The concepts of reliability  and validity  are the cornerstones  of any diagnostic or assessment  procedure.  First published in 1952  § Diagnostic and statistical  manual of mental  disorders (DSM) published by American psychiatric  association - Axis I: Clinical  Disorders  § Axis II: Developmental  disorders  and personality  disorders  § Axis III:  General medical  disorders  § Axis IV: Psychosocial and Environmental  problems  § Axis V: Global assessment  of functioning  scale (GAF scale)  § Multiaxial  classification  system DSM-IV-TR and likely  DSM-5  - In DSM-5 they are likely  to be reduced to one axis for clinical  syndrome and one for psychosocial  and environmental 
problems. 
- Classification  and Diagnosis  Either you are anxious or you are not anxious  Presence/absence  of a disorder  § Categorical  (DSM)  - Describes the degree of an entity that is present  How anxious are you from a scale  of 1 to 10?  Rank on a continuous quantitative  dimension  § Dimensional  (not DSM)  - Categorical  vs. Dimensional  systems of diagnosis  Mental illness  is universal  - The persons availability  of treatment  § Willingness  for one to seek help  § Types of symptoms  experienced  § Risk factors  § Culture can influence:  - The DSM includes 25 culture bound syndromes  in the appendix. Culture bound syndromes  are diagnoses that are likely to 
be seen within specific  regions.
- Ethical and Cultural  considerations  Ex: Depression after the death of a loved one  Should relatively  common reactions  be pathologized? (treated  as psychologically  abnormal or unhealthy)  § Too many diagnoses?  - Refers to the presence of a second diagnoses  § Some argue that this overlap Is a sign that we are dividing syndromes too finely.  45% of people diagnosed with one disorder will meet criteria  for a second disorder  § Comorbidity  - Criticism  of the DSM  Construct validity  is of highest concern - For most disorders,  there is no lab test available  to diagnose with certainty    § Diagnoses are constructs:  - Possible etiological  causes (past)  § Clinical  characteristics  (current)  § Predict treatment  response (future)  § Strong constructs validity  predicts  wide range of characteristics  - Construct validity  of diagnostic  categories  Treated differently  by others  § Difficulty  finding a job  § Stigma against  mental illness  - The disorder does not define the person  § She is an individual  with schizophrenia,  not a "schizophrenic"  § Categories do not capture the uniqueness  of a person  - Relevant information  may be overlooked  § Classification  may emphasize  trivial  similarities  - Criticisms  of classification  Described client's problem  § Determined causes of the problem  § Arrived at diagnoses  § Develop a treatment  strategy  § Monitor treatment  progress  § Conducting valid research  § Techniques employed to"  - Interviews  § Personality  inventories  § Intelligence  tests  § Ideal assessment  involves multiple  measures and methods  - Psychological  assessment  In these interviews,  the interviewer  pays close attention  to how the patient  answers the questions, how they don’t.  - They check to see if the response is accompanied by appropriate  emotion  - Informal  / less structured  interviews  - Empathy and accepting attitude  is very important  - Reliability  lower than for a structured  interview  - Clinical  interviews  All interviewers  ask the same questions  in a predetermined  order  - Very structured  - Good interrater  reliability  for most diagnostic  categories § Most symptoms  are rated on a three-point  scale  § Structured  clinical  interview for Axis I of DMS (SCID)  - Structured  interview  Yields profile of psychological functioning  Specific subscales  to detect lying and faking  Personality  tests  § Asses current  mental ability  Wechsler adult intelligence  scale (WAIS) ® Wechsler intelligence  scale for children (WISC)  ® Wechsler preschool  and primary scale for children, 3rd ed. (WPPSI-III)  ® Wechsler scales  Information  (general  knowledge)  Comprehension:  asks questions  designed to measure practical  knowledge and understanding of social rules and 
concepts 
Arithmetic:  requires solving series  of arithmetic  problems.  The examinee  must solve problems mentally,  without 
the use of pencil or paper, and respond orally within a time  limit. 
Used to predict  performance, diagnose learning  disabilities  or intellectual  developmental  disorder (mental 
retardation),  identify gifted  children. 
® Standord-Binet  Intelligence  tests  § The two most common psychological  tests are  - Asses personality  traits  and psychopathology  Primarily  intended to test people who are suspected of having mental  health or other clinical  issues  `Scale 1 - Hypochondriasis:  This scale  was designed to asses a neurotic concern over bodily functioning. 
Items  on this  scale include somatic  symptoms and physical  well being. 
® Scale 2 - Depression: This scale was originally  designed to identify  depression, characterized  by poor 
morale, lack of hope in future, and a general dissatisfaction  with one's own life situation 
® Scale 3 -  Hysteria:  The third  scale was originally  designed to identify  those who display hysteria  in 
stressful  situations.   
® Scale 4 - Psychopathic disorder:  Originally  developed to identify  psychopathic patients:  Originally 
developed to identify  psychopathic patients,  this scale measures  social deviation,  lack of acceptance of 
authority,  and morality.  Can be thought of as a scale of disobedience 
® Scale 5 - Masculinity/Femininity:  This scale was designed by the original  author's to identify  homosexual 
tendencies, but was found to be largely ineffective. 
® Scale 6 - Paranoia: This scale was originally  developed to Identify  patients  with paranoid symptoms  such 
as suspiciousness,  feelings  of persecution,  grandiose self-concepts,  excessive sensitivity,  and rigid 
attitudes. 
® Scale 7 - Psychasthenia:  This diagnostic  is no longer used today and the symptoms  described on this  scale 
are more reflective  of obsessive-compulsive  disorder. Was originally  used to measure  excessive doubts, 
compulsions,  obsessions etc.. 
® Scale 8 - Schizophrenia:  This scale was originally  developed to identify schizophrenic  patients  and reflects 
a wide variety  of areas including bizarre  thought processes and peculiar perceptions,  social  alienation,  poor 
familial  relationships,  difficulties  in concentration  and impulse  control, lack of deep interests,  disturbing 
questions of self-worth and self-identity,  and sexual difficulties.
® Scale 9 - Hypomania: This scale was developed to identify characteristics  of hypomania such as elevated 
mood, accelerated  speech and motor activity,  irritability,  flight  of ideas, and brief periods of depression 
® Scale 0 - Social introversion:  This scale was developed later than the other nine scales, its designed to 
assess a person's tendency to withdraw from social contacts 
® MMPI Scales  ? Scale - Cannot say (MMPI/MMPI-2).  A tally of omitted  items. High scores may be due to 
obsessiveness,  defensiveness,  difficulty  in reading, confusion, hostility,  or paranoia. Twenty or more 
unanswered should be considered significant 
I. Lie scales?  ® K Scale - Defensiveness.  K is a subtle and valuable correction  for defensiveness.  I. Assumes psychopathology. Is someone with a history  of psychopathology problems  scores high, then 
they are being defensive 
II. K scale  ® F scale - Infrequency. Very high possible random, exaggerated,  or mis-scored  profile.  I. Very high scores commonly  found with psychotic patients.  II. High scores best measure of overall  psychopathology, resentment,  acting out, and moodiness.  III. F scale  ® Validity scales  of MMPI  Most common test is the Minnesota  multiphasic  personality  test  § Personality  inventory:  The person is asked to complete a self-report  questionnaire  indicating  whether statements  assessing 
habitual tendencies  apply to him or her. 
- Psychological  test  The subjects perceptions  of inkblots  are recorded and then analyzed using psychological  interpretation    Rorschach inkblot  test  § It is known as the picture interpretation  technique  because it uses a series of provocative yet ambiguous pictures 
and the subject is asked to tell  a story
They are asked to tell  as dramatic  a story as they can for each picture.  What has led up to the event shown I. What is happening at the moment  II. What the characters  are feeling  and thinking  III. What the outcome of the story was  IV. Most of the common things asked are  Thematic apperception  test (TAT)  § Projective  tests  - Responses to ambiguous stimuli  reflect  unconscious processes § Projective  hypothesis  - Psychological  tests  Focus on aspects of environment  § Characteristic  of the person  § Frequency and form of problematic  behaviors  § Consequences of problem behaviors  § Behavioral assessments  are often conducted in lab setting  - Observe behavior as it occurs  - Antecedents and consequences  § Sequence of behavior divided into segments  - Ex: moods, stressful  evets, thoughts, etc…  Self-monitoring:  individuals  observe and record their  own behavior  § Involves the collection  of data in real time  as opposed to the more usual methods of having people reflect back 
over some time  period and report  on recently experienced  thoughts, moods, or stressors. 
Ecological momentary  assessment  (EMA)  § Self observation - Used to help plan treatment  targets  § Format often similar  to personality  test  § Identifies  negative  thought patterns  Dysfunctional  attitude  scale (DAS)  § Cognitive-style  questionnaires  - Behavioral & cognitive assessment  Helps to asses structural  brain abnormalities  A moving beam of x-rays passes a horizontal  cross section of the person's brain, scanning it through 360 
degrees; the moving x-ray detector  on the other side measures  the amount of radioactivity  that penetrates, 
detecting  subtle differences  in tissue  density. 
Computerized  axial tomography (CAT scan or CT) § Superior to the CAT scan because it gives a picture of much higher quality  and does not use even the smallest 
amount of radiation  that the CAT scan uses . 
The person is placed inside a large, circular  magnet, which causes the hydrogen atoms In the body to move. 
When the magnetic force is turned off, the atoms return to their original  positions,  which produces an 
electromagnetic  signal 
Magnetic resonance imaging  (MRI)  § Brain imaging  - Postmortem  studies  (Alzheimer's)  - Metabolite  levels:  Byproduct so neurotransmitter  breakdown found in urine, blood serum, or cerebral  fluid.  § May not reflect  the actual level of neurotransmitter  § Metabolite  assays  - Studies how brain abnormalities  affect  thinking, feeling,  and behavior  § Neuropsychologist  - Reveal performance  deficits  that can indicate areas of brain malfunction  § Tactile performance  test-time  Tactile performance  test-memory  Speech sounds perception test  Halstead-Reitan  battery  § Assesses motor skills,  tactile  and kinesthetic  skills,  verbal and spatial  skills,  expressive and receptive  speech  Luria-Nebraska battery  § Measures developed for one culture or ethnic group may not be valid or reliable  for another  Can lead to exaggerating or minimizing  psychological problems  Increase graduate student sensitivity  to cultural  issues  ® Strategies  to avoid the bias:  Cultural bias in assessment  § Make allowances for variations  in the use of personal space  Respectful of cultural  variations  of touch (hugging, kiss introductions,  etc…)  Adjust the communication  style  Expand roles and practices  as needed  Cultural responsiveness  § Neuropsychological  tests  - Neurobiological  Assessment Diagnosis & assessment  Chapter 4  The systematic  pursuit  of knowledge through observation    § Scientist  gather data to test theories  § Science: comes from the latin scire, "to know" - Means that a hypothesis is testable  by empirical  experiments,  and conforms  to the standard of scientific  method  A good theory is falsifiable § Theory: a set of propositions  meant to explain a class of observations  - Hypothesis: specific  predictions  about what will occur if a theory is correct  - Science and scientific  methods  Great source of hypothesis  § Can provide information  about novel cases or procedures  § Can disconfirm  a relationship  that was believed to be universal  § Cannot provide causal evidence because cannot rule out alternative  hypothesis  § Case study: collection  of detailed biographical  information  - May be biased by observer's theoretical  views  § Widely used because we cannot manipulate  many risk variables  or diagnosis  in psychopathology research  in humans  § Cannot determine  causality  because of the directionality  and third variable  problems  § Correlation:  Study of the relationship  between two or more variables;  measured as they exist in nature  - Best method for determining  causal relationships  § Experiment:  includes a manipulated  independent variable, a dependent variable,  preferably at least one control  group, and 
random assignment  group. 
- Detailed biographical  description  of an individual  § Rich description,  especially  helpful  for rare disorders  Generate hypothesis  Disprove hypothesis  Usefulness § Paradigm may influence observations  Cannot rule out alternative  explanations  Cannot prove hypothesis  Limitations  § Case study  - Ex: Do people who have more stress  have more headaches?  Studies questions of the form "Do variable X and variable Y vary together?" § Variables are measured but not manipulated  § Cannot determine  cause or effect  § The correlation  method  - Varies from -1.0 to +1.0 § Strength:  the high the absolute value, the stronger the relationship § Positive:  Higher scores on variable  X associated  with high score of variable  Y  Negative: Higher scores on variable  X associated with lower scores on variable  Y  Direction  § Large samples  increase likelihood  of significance  ® Can be influenced by number of participants  Statistical  significance § Is the association  meaningful  as well as statistically  significant?  Whether a relationship  between variables  is large enough to matter  Clinical  significance  § Correlation  does not imply causality  We do not know which variable  may cause the other  ® Variable X may cause variable Y  ® Variable Y may cause variable X  ® There may even be a third variable  not taken into account  ® Directionality  problem  Problems of causality  § Cross - sectional:  Causes and effects  are measured at the same point in time.  Follow large population  over time  ® High risk method: With this approach, only people who have the highest risk of developing a disorder  are 
included 
® Longitudinal:  examines whether causes are present  before disorder  develops  Longitudinal  vs. Cross-sectional  design  § Measuring correlation  - Study of the distribution  of disorders  in a population and possible  correlations  § Prevalence:  The proportion  of people with the disorder either  currently  or during their lifetime  § Incidence:  The proportion  of people who develop new cases of the disorder in a period of time, usually a year  § Increased risk of disease or infection  Ex: Obesity is a risk factor for high blood pressure  Risk factors:  Variables  that are related  to the likelihood  of developing the disorder  § Epidemiological  research  - Methods in psychopathology  Family method  § Twin method  § Adoptees method  § 50% shared genes  First degree relatives  (parents,  children, siblings)  § 25% shared genes  Second degree relatives  (aunts, uncles, grandparents)  § Sample of individuals  who psychopathology  Index cases/probands  § Family studies  - 100% shared genes  Monozygotic (MZ)/ Identical  twins  § 50% shared genes  Dizygotic (DZ)/ Fraternal  twins  § Similarity  of diagnosis  Concordance  § Twin studies  - In identical  twins, if one has schizophrenia,  the other has a 50% chance of getting it as well  § In fraternal  twins, it drops to 15%  § Schizophrenia twin method  - Methods to determine  genetic predisposition  (concordance)  to psychopathology  Adoption studies:  Study adoptees who have biological  parents  with psychopathology  - Cross-fostering:  Study of adoptees who have adoptive parents with psychopathology  - Behavioral genetics  Association studies:  Examine the relationship  between a specific  allele and a trait  or behavior in the population  - Molecular  genetics  Provides information  on causal relationships  - Hypothesis  - Null hypothesis:  No difference  between groups  - Random assignment  § Independent variable (manipulated)  § Dependent variable  (measured),  expected to vary with conditions  of the independent  variable.  § Involves:  - Can evaluate treatment  effectiveness  - Experimental  effect:  Differences between conditions  on the dependent variable  - Internal  validity:  Extent to which experimental  effect is due to independent variable  - Would results apply to others besides  the study participants?  § External validity:  Extent to which results  generalize beyond the study  - Treatment  manuals  § Placebo  Control group  § Double blind procedure  § Empirically  supported  treatments  - Exclusion of diverse populations  § Sample composition  - Efficacy:  Whether a treatment  works under the purest of conditions  § Effectiveness:  How well the treatment  works in the real world  § Efficacy and effectiveness  - Experiments  are not always possible  in psychopathology due to ethical  or practical  constraints  § Induce temporary  symptoms  College students who tend to be anxious or depressed  ® Recruit participants  with similarities  to diagnosable disorders  Animal research  Create or observe a related phenomenon - analogue - in the lab to allow more intensive  study  § Analogue experiment  - The experiment  Research methods in the study of psychopathology Abnormal Psychology Friday, February 3, 2017 5:07 PM
background image Exam 1 Study Guide  Introduction  & Historical  preview  Chapter 1  The study of mental disorders  It studies the nature, development, & treatment  of psychological disorders  Avoid preconceived notions  - Maintain  objectivity  - Reduce stigma  - Challenges to this  study include  Psychopathology  Emotional  pain & suffering  - Personal distress  Ex: Poor work performance  or serious  fight with ones spouse § Impairment  in some important  area of life  - Disability  Makes others uncomfortable  or causes problems  - Violation of social norms  The disorder occurs within the individual  - It involves clinically  proven significant  difficulties  in thinking,  feeling, or behaving  - It involves dysfunction in processes that support mental  functioning  - It is not a culturally  specific  reaction  to an event  - It is not mainly a result  of a problem  with society or social deviance  - When thinking of defining a mental  disorder one must also take these things into consideration:  Defining mental disorder  Distinguishing  label is applied  I. Label refers  to undesirable  attributes  II. People with the label  are seen as different  III. People with the label  are discriminated  against  IV. The four characteristics  of a stigma  are:  Stigma  Possession by evil being or spirits  / Exorcism  - Early Demonology  Mental disturbances  have natural  causes, they are not supernatural,  instead  they are due to problems  in the brain § Mania  I. Melancholia  II. Phrenitis  (Brain fever)  III. Three categories  of mental  disorders  § Blood  I. Black bile  II. Yellow bile  III. Phlegm IV. Normal brain functioning depend on balance of four humors § Hippocrates (5th century BC)  - Early Biological Explanations  Torture sometimes  led to delusional  sounding confessions  - Historians  have concluded that many of the accused were mentally  ill (little  support was found for this conclusion)  - Witches (13th century AD)  They were trials  held to determine  sanity   - Began in 13th century England  - Municipal  authorities  assumed responsibility  for care of mentally  ill  - "Lunacy" attributes  insanity  to misalignment  of moon (luna) and the stars  - Lunacy trials  They were established  for the care and confinement  of the mentally  ill in 15th century AD  - The institute  was called St. Mary of Bethlehem  § Wealthy people would pay to look at the insane  § One of the first  mental  institutions  was founded in 1243  - Treatment  in asylums  was either  non-existent  or harmful  to the patients  - promoted public health by advocating  for personal hygiene and a clean environment § Pioneered humanitarian  treatment  § Benjamin Rush - French physician  who was instrumental  in the development  of a more humane approach to the custody and care of 
psychiatric  patients.  This is referred  to as moral  therapy 
§ He also made contributions  to the classification  of mental  disorders and has been described by some as "father of 
modern psychiatry" 
§ Philippe Pinel (20 April 1745-25 October 1826) - Patients  engaged in calming  and purposeful activities    Talked with attendants  Small, privately  funded, humanitarian  hospitals  § Moral treatment - Asylums  Brief history of Psychopathology  Crusader for pioneers  and mentally  ill  - Urged improvement  of institutions  - Worked to establish  32 new, public  hospitals  - Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) (American  activists)  Psychological  (delusions and grandeur)  I. Physical symptoms  (progressive  paralysis)  II. Degenerative disorder  with psychological  symptoms  and physical symptoms  - It is a neuropsychiatric  disorder that  affects the brain  - Was originally  considered a psychiatric  disorder  when it was scientifically  identified  around the 19th century.  - Patient usually  presented with psychotic  symptoms  of sudden and often dramatic  onset.  - Since general paresis had biological  cause, other mental illness  might also have biological  causes  Biological  causes of psychopathology gained credibility  By mid-1800s it was known that general  paresis and syphilis  occurred together in some patients,  in 1905 the biological 
causes of syphilis  were found 
- General Paresis (syphilis)  Parents jointly  contribute  one half  I. Grandparents one quarter II. Great - grandparents one eighth….  Etc  III. His law states  that our heritage  is, on average, constituted  from that of our ancestors  according to the following proportions:  - Galton's (1822-1911) work lead to notion that mental  illness  can be inherited  Promotion  of enforced sterilization  to eliminate  undesirable  characteristics  from the population  - Many state  laws required mentally  ill  to be sterilized  - Eugenics The evolution of Contemporary thought Sakel (1930's)  - Insulin-coma  therapy  1938  - Used for schizophrenic  patients  § Induced epileptic  seizures with electric  shock  - Did NOT help them at all  - Does help severe depression  - Electroconvulsive  Therapy (ECT)  Moniz (1935)  - Often used to control violent  behaviors;  led to listlessness,  apathy, and loss of cognitive abilities  - Prefrontal  lobotomy  Early Biological treatments  Treated patients  with hysteria  - Using "animal magnetism"  - Early practitioner  of hypnosis  - Student: Charcot  - Mesmer (1734-1815)  Medical doctor (1825-1893)  - His support legitimizes  hypnosis as treatment  for hysteria  - Charcot  Anna O. was the pseudonym of a patient of Josef Breuer, who published her case study in his book "Studies on 
Hysteria", written in collaboration  with Sigmund Freud. 
§ Her real name was Bertha Pappenheim (1859-1936)  § She was an Austrian-Jewish  feminist  and the founder of the League of Jewish Women.  § Despite the Breuer and Freud's claims,  Anna O did NOT get better  from her treatment  with Breuer and was 
hospitalized  several  times afterward. 
§ She appeared to have neurological  problems  (perhaps epilepsy)  § Used hypnosis to facilitate  catharsis  in Anna O.  - Release of emotional  tension triggered  by reliving  and talking about event.  § Cathartic  method - Breuer (1842-1925)  Breuer and Freud jointly  published, "Studies in Hysteria" in 1895, which serves as the basis for Freud's theory. - Human behavior determined  by unconscious forces  § Psychopathology results  from conflicts  among these unconscious forces  § Freudian or Psychoanalytic  theory  - Composed of biological,  instinctual  drives  I. Innate (born with it)  II. Seeks immediate,  indiscriminant  gratification III. Source of mental energy  IV. Obeys the pleasure  principal:  pleasure is good, and nothing else matters.  V. Libido: biological  force (energy of ID)  VI. Thanatos: The death instinct  VII. Gratifying  urges returns  body to homeostasis  VIII. ID (Primal  desires/Basic  nature) § Organized, rational, reality-oriented  system  I. Develops first  2 years of life as infant experiences  reality  II. Holds id in check until  suitable object  is found  III. Helps id achieve gratification  within confines of reality  IV. Prevents id drives  from violating superego principles  V. Obeys the reality  principle:  Behavior takes into account the external  world  VI. Ego (Reason/Self control) § Learned  I. Inhibits  ("breaks") id urges  II. Strives for perfection  III. "Irrational"  operates on extremes good or bad  IV. Ego ideals - The person we'd like to be  V. Developed through rewards  VI. Conscience - right and wrong  VII. Developed though punishment  VIII. Formed around age 5 via Oedipal complex  resolution  IX. Superego (The quest for perfection)  § Freud's Structural  Model  - Freud (1856-1939) The evolution of contemporary thought Ego generates strategies  to protect itself  from  anxiety  § Defense mechanisms:  Psychological  maneuvers used to manage stress & anxiety  Conflict generates  anxiety  - Id, Ego, & Superego continually  in conflict  Repression: Keeping unacceptable impulses  or wishes from conscious awareness  - Denial: Not accepting a painful  reality  into conscious awareness  - Projection:  Attributing  to someone else one's own unacceptable  thoughts or feelings - Displacement:  Redirecting  emotional  responses from their  real target to someone else  - Reaction formation:  Converting an unacceptable feeling into its opposite  - Regression: Retreating  to the behavioral  patterns of an earlier  stage of development   - Rationalize:  Offering acceptable  reasons for an unacceptable action or attitude  - Sublimation:  Converting unacceptable aggressive  or sexual impulses  into socially valued behaviors  - Selected defense mechanisms  Defense Mechanisms  Understand early-childhood  experiences,  particularly  key (parental)  relationships  - Understand patterns in current relationships  - Goals of psychoanalytic therapy or psychoanalysis  The patient tries  to say whatever comes to mind without censoring  anything  Free Association  - Transference is a phenomenon characterized  by unconscious redirection  of feelings  from one person to another 
(patient  to therapist) 
The patient responds to the analyst  in ways that the patient  has previously  responded to other important  figures  in his 
or her life, and the analyst helps the patient  understand and interpret  these responses 
Analysis of transference  - The Liberation from  the conflict  (effects  of the unconscious material)  is achieved through bringing this material  into 
the conscious mind 
The analysts points out to the patient  the meaning of certain  of the patient's  behaviors  Interpretation  - Psychoanalytic  Techniques  Psychoanalytic  Therapy  Analytical  psychology  - Archetypes  According to Jungian Psychoanalysis,  the Great Mother archetype symbolizes  creativity,  birth,  fertility,  sexual 
union and nurturing.  She is a creative force not only for life, but also for art and ideas 
The mother figure  Collective  unconscious  - Jung (1875-1961) Childhood experiences help shape adult personality  - There are unconscious influences  on behavior  - Continuing influences  of Freud and his followers  Neo-Freudians  Focus on observable behavior  Emphasis on learning  rather than thinking  or innate tendencies  Behaviorism  - Classical  conditioning  Operant conditioning  Modeling  Three types of learning  - John Watson (1878-1958) In behaviorist  terms,  the dog's salivation  is known as an unconditioned  response ( a stimulus- response connection that 
required no learning) 
- Unconditioned stimulus  (Food) > Unconditioned response (salivation)  In behaviorist  terms  it is written  as:  - Pavlov showed the existence of the unconditioned  response by presenting a dog with a bowl of food and then measuring  its 
salivary  secretions 
- Pavlovian conditioning  (Pavlov's dogs)  Meat powder (automatically  elicits  salivation)  Unconditioned stimulus  (USC) - Salivation  (automatic  response to meat powder)  Unconditioned response (UR) - Initial  ringing of bell (does not automatically  elicit  salivation)  Neutral stimulus  (NS) - After pairing the NS and the UCS, the NS becomes a CS (bell  now automatically  elicits  salivation)  Conditioned stimulus  (CS) - Salivation  (automatic  response to bell)  Condition response (CR)  - CS (bell) not followed by USC (meat powder) causes gradual disappearance  of CR (salivation)  Extinction  - Discovered by Pavlov (1849-1936)  Principle  of reinforcement  Behaviors followed by pleasant stimuli  are strengthened  Positive  reinforcement  Behaviors that terminate  negative stimulus  are strengthened  Negative reinforcement  B.F Skinner (1904-1990)  - Operant Conditioning;  behavior that operates  on the environment  Can occur without reinforcement  Learning by watching and imitating  others behaviors  - Modeling reduced children's fear of dogs  Bandura & Menlove (1968)  - Modeling  Used to treat  phobias  Combines deep muscle relaxation  and gradual exposure to the feared condition  or object  Usually starts with minimal  anxiety producing condition  and gradually progresses  to more feared Systematic  desensitization  (imagine  what you fear while in deep relaxation) - Rewarding a behavior only occasionally  more effective  than continuous schedules of reinforcement  Intermittent  reinforcement  - Behavior Therapy or Behavior modification  The evolution of contemporary thought  How we think or appraise a situation  influences  our feelings and behaviors  - Limitations  of behavior therapy  Emphasizes how people think about themselves  and their  experiences can be a major  determinant  of psychopathology  - Focus on understanding  maladaptive  thoughts  - Change cognitions to change feelings  and behaviors  - Cognitive therapy  Importance  of cognitions  Chapter 2 A paradigm is a set of basic assumptions  that influence how you think about data  - Paradigms in psychopathology  Aim for objectivity  Goal: Study abnormal behavior scientifically.  - We can never really be objective;  subjective  factors  interfere Perspective  or conceptual framework  from within which a scientist  operates  Paradigm (Thomas Kuhn)  - Notion of a paradigm  Current Paradigms of psychopathology  Behavioral genetics  - Molecular  genetics  - Gene-environment  interactions  - Genetic paradigm  The Genetic paradigm  Carriers of genetic information  - Ex: relationships,  culture  Impacted by environment  influences  - Relationship  between genes and environment  is bidirectional  - Genes  Proteins influence  whether the action of a specific gene will occur  - Gene expression  Multiple  gene pairs vs. single gene  - A number of gene pairs combine their influences  to create a single (phenotypic)  trait  - Polygenic transmission  Extent to which variability  In behavior is due to genetic factors  - It estimates  range from 0.0 to 1.0, the higher the number, the greater the heritability  - Heritability  Heredity plays a role in most behavior  Ex: siblings  who are raised in the same environment,  by the same parents,  go to the same school, etc…  Events and experiences that family  members  have in common  - Shared environment  Ex: one sibling  might have been in a car accident but not the other Events and experiences that are unique to each family  member  - Nonshared environment  Environmental  effects  Study of the degree to which genes and environmental  factors  influence behavior  Genetic material  by an individual  - They are unobservable  - Consists of inherited genes  Genotype: The total  genetic makeup of a person  - Genotypes (unobservable)  Observable expression of the genes  Expressed genetic material  - Ex: Green eyes  Observable behavior or characteristics  - Depends on interaction  of genotype and environment  - Phenotype (observable)  Behavior genetics  The field of biology and genetics  that studies the structure  and function of genes at a molecular  level  *Remember APOE, allele 4 associated  with AD Different  in DNA sequence on a gene occurring in a population Alleles  - Difference in DNA sequence on a gene occurring  in a population  Polymorphism  - Refers to differences  between people In a single nucleotide  in the DNA sequence of a particular  gene.  One area of interest  in the study of gene sequence involves identifying  what are called single nucleotide  polymorphisms  or 
SNPs 
- A CNV can be present in a single gene or multiple  genes. The name refers  to an abnormal  copy of one or more 
sections  of DNA within the gene(s).
Another area of interest  is the study of differences  between people in gene culture,  including the identification  of what are
called copy number variations  (CNVs) 
- Identifies  particular  genes and their  functions  Molecular  genetics  An example would be if a person has gene XYZ, he or she might respond to a snake bite by developing a fear of snakes. 
Another person without gene XYZ would not have developed a fear of snakes after  being bitten. 
- Another example  would  be depression  - One's response to a specific  environmental  event is influenced by genes Researchers had found that those with either the short-short  allele  or the short-long  allele combinations  of the 5-HTT 
gene  
This shows how it was a combination  of the genes and the environment.  I. and  were maltreated  as children were most  likely to have major depressive disorder  as adults than either those people 
who had the gene combination  but where not maltreated  as children  or those who had the long-long allele  but where 
also maltreated  as children. 
This gene has a polymorphism  such that some people have two short alleles  (short-short),  some have two long alleles (long-
long) and some have one short one long (long-short). 
- Serotonin transporter  gene (5-HTT)  The study of the phenotypic trait  variations  caused by environmental  factors  that switch genes on and off - Epigenetics  Ex: A genetic risk for alcohol use disorder may predispose persons to life events that put them in high risk situations 
for alcohol use such as being in trouble with the law. 
The basic idea is that genes may predispose us to seek out certain  environments  that then increase  our risk to developing a 
particular  disorder. 
- Reciprocal gene-environment  interactions  Gene-Environment  Interaction Examines the contribution  of brain structure  and function to psychopathology  - The neuroscience paradigm  holds that mental  disorders  are linked to aberrant processes in the brain.  Neurons and neurotransmitters  I. Brain structure and function  II. Neuroendocrine system III. Three major  components are:  Cell body  I. Dendrites  II. Axons  III. Terminal  buttons  IV. Four major parts  include:  Neurons: cells of the nervous system  - Nerve impulse:  Occurs when a neuron is appropriately  stimulated  at its cell body or through its dendrites.  It travels down 
the axon to the terminal  endings. 
- Synapse: Between the terminal  endings of the sending axon and the cell membrane of the receiving  neuron.  - Neurons   Chemicals that allow neurons to send a signal across the synapse to another neuron  - Excitatory:  Leading to the creation  of a nerve impulse  in the postsynaptic  neuron  I. Inhibitory:  Making the postsynaptic  cell less likely to create a nerve impulse.  II. Receptor sites on postsynaptic  neuron absorb neurotransmitter  which can either  be:  - Reuptake: Reabsorption of leftover  neurotransmitter  by presynaptic  neuron  - Implicated  In depression, mania, and schizophrenia  Serotonin and dopamine  Implicated  in anxiety and other stress-related  disorders  Norepinephrine  Inhibits  nerve impulses  Implicated  in anxiety  Gamma-aminobutyric  acid (GABA)  Several key neurotransmitters  are:  - Excessive or inadequate levels  Insufficient  reuptake  Excessive number or hypersensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  Possible mechanisms:  - Once they are released, they play a role in adjusting the sensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  to dopamine, 
norepinephrine,  or serotonin. 
When a cell has been firing more frequently,  this receptor  releases second messengers.  - Ex: A serotonin agonist is a drug that  stimulates  serotonin receptors  to produce the same effects  as serotonin  does 
naturally. 
Agonist: A drug that stimulates  a particular  neurotransmitter's  receptors.  - Ex: Many drugs used to treat schizophrenia  are dopamine antagonists  that work by blocking dopamine receptors.  Antagonist:  A drug that works on a neurotransmitter's  receptors to dampen the activity  of that neurotransmitter  - Neurotransmitter  HPA axis involved in stress  - Hypothalamus triggers  release of corticotrophin-releasing  hormone (CRF)  - Pituitary  gland releases adrenocorticotropic  hormone (ACTH) - Adrenal cortex triggers  release  of cortisol,  the stress hormone  - The HPA axis of the neuroendocrine  system  Antidepressants  Antipsychotics  Benzodiazepines  Psychoactive drugs alter neurotransmitter  activity  - A neuroscience view does not preclude psychological  interventions  - Neuroscience approaches to treatment  Reductionism:  View that behavior can best be understood by reducing it to its  basic biological  components  - Evaluating the neuroscience paradigm  Current paradigms:  Neuroscience  Roots in learning principles  and cognitive  science  Getting attention  - Escape or avoidance  - Sensory stimulation  - Access to desirable objects  or events  - Behavior is reinforced  by consequences such as:  Strengthens responses  - Ex: Giving a dog a treat after she sits.  Presents something  pleasant after  a behavior is emitted  - Positive  reinforcement  All behavior is determined  by our reinforcement  history  - B.F Skinner  Ex: Time- out, when a child behaves incorrectly  and as a consequence is sent for a period of time to a location  with no 
positive  reinforcement. 
- In order to alter  behavior, one must modify consequences  Relaxation plus imagined exposure  - Important  treatment  for anxiety disorders  - Driving to clinic  1. Entering treatment  room  2. Seeing clinic nurse  3. Train patient to associate alternative  response (ex: deep muscle relaxation)  with these events.  § Construct hierarchy  of events related to original  stimulus  which elicits  the maladaptive  response for each patient  - Systematic  desensitization  A treatment  to systematically  increase exposure to positive activities,  and thereby improve affect  and corresponding 
cognitions. 
- Behavioral activation  (for depression) Behaviorism  criticized  for ignoring thoughts and emotions  - Cognitive science focuses on how people (and animals)  structure  their experiences,  how they make sense of them, and how 
they relate their current  experiences to past ones that have been stored in memory. 
- Perceiving, recognizing,  conceiving, judging, and reasoning  § A mental process that includes:  - Organized network of previously  accumulated  knowledge  § We actively  interpret  new information  § Schema (cognitive schema)  - Anxious individuals  more likely to attend to threat or danger § Role of attention in psychopathology  - Cognitive science  What is important  is the cognitive process, not the behavior  - Learners are not passive responders to the environmental  stimuli  - Learners are actively  making mental  connections between new information  and old information.  - Learners organize their knowledge into categories  and connected networks.  - Cognitive paradigm  Attends to thoughts, perceptions,  judgments,  self-statements,  and unconscious assumptions  - Incorporates  theory and research on cognitive  processes.  - Change a pattern of thinking  § Changes in thinking  can change feelings,  behaviors, and symptoms  § Cognitive reconstructing  - Cognitive behavior therapy  Initially  developed for depression  - Beck developed a cognitive therapy for depression based on the idea that depressed mood is caused by distortions  In the 
way people perceive life  events 
- Attention, interpretation,  and recall of negative and positive  information  biased in depression  § Information-processing  bias  - Help patients  recognize and change their  negative thought patterns - Beck's cognitive therapy  Focus is on current determinants  of disorder  and less on historical,  childhood antecedents.  - Answer is still  unclear  § Are distorted  thoughts the cause or the result  of psychopathology?  - Evaluating the CBT paradigm  Cognitive paradigms:  Cognitive behavioral  Influence how we respond to problems and challenges  in our environment  - Help us organize our thoughts and actions, both explicitly  and implicitly  - Guide our behavior  - Expressive  § Experiential  § Physiological  § Components:  - Emotions Disturbances in emotion is key to several  disorders  Ex: Flat affect in schizophrenia  (a severe reduction  in emotional  expressiveness)  § Most psychopathology includes disturbances  of one or more component  - Americans value happiness more as someone from another culture,  for example East Asian cultures,  like China, 
value calmness more than happiness 
Western vs. Eastern philosophy  § Ideal effect:  Refers to the kinds of emotional  states that a person ideally wants to feel  - Emotional  dysregulation  Gender, race, culture, ethnicity,  and socioeconomics  status  § Ex: Women more likely to experience  depression than men.  May increase  vulnerability  to psychopathology  § Sociocultural  factors  - Factors that cut across the paradigms  Object relations  theory: Stresses the importance  for long-standing  patterns in close relationships,  particularly  within 
the family. 
§ Attachment  theory: The type of style of an infant's  attachment  to his or her caregiver can set the stage for 
psychological  health or problems  later in life 
§ Stresses  the importance  of interpersonal  relationships  - Interpersonal  psychotherapy  (IPT) focuses upon improving  problematic  interpersonal  relationships - Unsolved grief:  Grief which is either  delayed and experienced long after the loss  I. Role disputes:  The patient and significant  people in his life have different  expectations about their relationships  II. Role transitions:  Depression may occur during life transitions  when a person's role changes and he doesn’t know how 
to cope with the change 
III. Interpersonal  deficits:  This may be an area of focus if the patient  has had problems  with forming  and maintaining   
good quality relationships. 
IV. Four basic problems  recognized by IPT  - Interpersonal   theory  Genetic, neurobiological,  psychological,  and environmental  § Integrative  model that incorporates  multiple  causal factors  - May be biological  or psychological  (gene or cognitive  style)  Underlying predisposition  § Increase one's risk of developing disorder  § Diathesis  - May occur at any point after  conception  Triggering event  Environmental  events  § Death of spouse  Divorce  Marital  separation  Jail term  Death of family  member  Personal injury or illness  Marriage  Fired at wok  Most common stressors  include  § Stress  - Diathesis-Stress  Current paradigms:  The factors that cut across paradigms  (trans-diagnostic)  Chapter 3 The classification  of disorders by symptoms  and signs - Diagnosis  Facilitates  communication  among professionals  about cases and research  - Advances the search for causes and treatments  - Cornerstone of clinical  care  - Helps in specifying appropriate  treatment - Advantages of diagnosis include the following  Inter-rater:  Refers to the degree to which two independent observers  agree on what they have observed.  Test-retest:  Similarity  of scores across repeated test  administrations  or observations Alternate form  reliability:  Similarity  of scored on tests  that are similar  but not identical  Internal  consistency:  Asses whether the items  on a test are related to one another Consistency of measurement  is assessed  by these different  types of reliabilities:  § Reliability:  Consists of measurement  - Just because something  is reliable  does not mean it is always valid  § Ex: The item on the test represent  the entire  range of possible items  the test  should cover  Content validity:  Extent to which a measure  adequately samples  the domain of interest  § If both variable  are measured at the same point in time, the resulting  validity  is referred  to as concurrent validity.  Alternatively,  criterion  validity  can be assessed by evaluating  the ability  of the measure to predict some other 
variable that is measured at some point in the future, often referred to as predictive  validity. 
Criterion  validity:  Evaluated by determining  whether a measure is associated  in an expected way with some other 
measures (the criterion) 
§ Involves correlating  multiple  indirect  measures of the attributes.  a) Construct:  An abstract  concept or inferred  attribute,  such as anxiousness or distorted  cognition.  I. Construct validity:  The degree to which a test measures what it claims,  or purports, to be measuring § In medicine  and statistics,  gold standard  usually refers to a diagnostic  test or benchmark that is the best available 
under reasonable  conditions. 
Other times  it is used to refer to the most accurate test possible  Gold standard  § Extent to which clinicians  agree on the diagnoses  Interrater  reliability  § Validity:  Related to whether a measure measures  what it is supposed to measure.  - The concepts of reliability  and validity  are the cornerstones  of any diagnostic or assessment  procedure.  First published in 1952  § Diagnostic and statistical  manual of mental  disorders (DSM) published by American psychiatric  association - Axis I: Clinical  Disorders  § Axis II: Developmental  disorders  and personality  disorders  § Axis III:  General medical  disorders  § Axis IV: Psychosocial and Environmental  problems  § Axis V: Global assessment  of functioning  scale (GAF scale)  § Multiaxial  classification  system DSM-IV-TR and likely  DSM-5  - In DSM-5 they are likely  to be reduced to one axis for clinical  syndrome and one for psychosocial  and environmental 
problems. 
- Classification  and Diagnosis  Either you are anxious or you are not anxious  Presence/absence  of a disorder  § Categorical  (DSM)  - Describes the degree of an entity that is present  How anxious are you from a scale  of 1 to 10?  Rank on a continuous quantitative  dimension  § Dimensional  (not DSM)  - Categorical  vs. Dimensional  systems of diagnosis  Mental illness  is universal  - The persons availability  of treatment  § Willingness  for one to seek help  § Types of symptoms  experienced  § Risk factors  § Culture can influence:  - The DSM includes 25 culture bound syndromes  in the appendix. Culture bound syndromes  are diagnoses that are likely to 
be seen within specific  regions.
- Ethical and Cultural  considerations  Ex: Depression after the death of a loved one  Should relatively  common reactions  be pathologized? (treated  as psychologically  abnormal or unhealthy)  § Too many diagnoses?  - Refers to the presence of a second diagnoses  § Some argue that this overlap Is a sign that we are dividing syndromes too finely.  45% of people diagnosed with one disorder will meet criteria  for a second disorder  § Comorbidity  - Criticism  of the DSM  Construct validity  is of highest concern - For most disorders,  there is no lab test available  to diagnose with certainty    § Diagnoses are constructs:  - Possible etiological  causes (past)  § Clinical  characteristics  (current)  § Predict treatment  response (future)  § Strong constructs validity  predicts  wide range of characteristics  - Construct validity  of diagnostic  categories  Treated differently  by others  § Difficulty  finding a job  § Stigma against  mental illness  - The disorder does not define the person  § She is an individual  with schizophrenia,  not a "schizophrenic"  § Categories do not capture the uniqueness  of a person  - Relevant information  may be overlooked  § Classification  may emphasize  trivial  similarities  - Criticisms  of classification  Described client's problem  § Determined causes of the problem  § Arrived at diagnoses  § Develop a treatment  strategy  § Monitor treatment  progress  § Conducting valid research  § Techniques employed to"  - Interviews  § Personality  inventories  § Intelligence  tests  § Ideal assessment  involves multiple  measures and methods  - Psychological  assessment  In these interviews,  the interviewer  pays close attention  to how the patient  answers the questions, how they don’t.  - They check to see if the response is accompanied by appropriate  emotion  - Informal  / less structured  interviews  - Empathy and accepting attitude  is very important  - Reliability  lower than for a structured  interview  - Clinical  interviews  All interviewers  ask the same questions  in a predetermined  order  - Very structured  - Good interrater  reliability  for most diagnostic  categories § Most symptoms  are rated on a three-point  scale  § Structured  clinical  interview for Axis I of DMS (SCID)  - Structured  interview  Yields profile of psychological functioning  Specific subscales  to detect lying and faking  Personality  tests  § Asses current  mental ability  Wechsler adult intelligence  scale (WAIS) ® Wechsler intelligence  scale for children (WISC)  ® Wechsler preschool  and primary scale for children, 3rd ed. (WPPSI-III)  ® Wechsler scales  Information  (general  knowledge)  Comprehension:  asks questions  designed to measure practical  knowledge and understanding of social rules and 
concepts 
Arithmetic:  requires solving series  of arithmetic  problems.  The examinee  must solve problems mentally,  without 
the use of pencil or paper, and respond orally within a time  limit. 
Used to predict  performance, diagnose learning  disabilities  or intellectual  developmental  disorder (mental 
retardation),  identify gifted  children. 
® Standord-Binet  Intelligence  tests  § The two most common psychological  tests are  - Asses personality  traits  and psychopathology  Primarily  intended to test people who are suspected of having mental  health or other clinical  issues  `Scale 1 - Hypochondriasis:  This scale  was designed to asses a neurotic concern over bodily functioning. 
Items  on this  scale include somatic  symptoms and physical  well being. 
® Scale 2 - Depression: This scale was originally  designed to identify  depression, characterized  by poor 
morale, lack of hope in future, and a general dissatisfaction  with one's own life situation 
® Scale 3 -  Hysteria:  The third  scale was originally  designed to identify  those who display hysteria  in 
stressful  situations.   
® Scale 4 - Psychopathic disorder:  Originally  developed to identify  psychopathic patients:  Originally 
developed to identify  psychopathic patients,  this scale measures  social deviation,  lack of acceptance of 
authority,  and morality.  Can be thought of as a scale of disobedience 
® Scale 5 - Masculinity/Femininity:  This scale was designed by the original  author's to identify  homosexual 
tendencies, but was found to be largely ineffective. 
® Scale 6 - Paranoia: This scale was originally  developed to Identify  patients  with paranoid symptoms  such 
as suspiciousness,  feelings  of persecution,  grandiose self-concepts,  excessive sensitivity,  and rigid 
attitudes. 
® Scale 7 - Psychasthenia:  This diagnostic  is no longer used today and the symptoms  described on this  scale 
are more reflective  of obsessive-compulsive  disorder. Was originally  used to measure  excessive doubts, 
compulsions,  obsessions etc.. 
® Scale 8 - Schizophrenia:  This scale was originally  developed to identify schizophrenic  patients  and reflects 
a wide variety  of areas including bizarre  thought processes and peculiar perceptions,  social  alienation,  poor 
familial  relationships,  difficulties  in concentration  and impulse  control, lack of deep interests,  disturbing 
questions of self-worth and self-identity,  and sexual difficulties.
® Scale 9 - Hypomania: This scale was developed to identify characteristics  of hypomania such as elevated 
mood, accelerated  speech and motor activity,  irritability,  flight  of ideas, and brief periods of depression 
® Scale 0 - Social introversion:  This scale was developed later than the other nine scales, its designed to 
assess a person's tendency to withdraw from social contacts 
® MMPI Scales  ? Scale - Cannot say (MMPI/MMPI-2).  A tally of omitted  items. High scores may be due to 
obsessiveness,  defensiveness,  difficulty  in reading, confusion, hostility,  or paranoia. Twenty or more 
unanswered should be considered significant 
I. Lie scales?  ® K Scale - Defensiveness.  K is a subtle and valuable correction  for defensiveness.  I. Assumes psychopathology. Is someone with a history  of psychopathology problems  scores high, then 
they are being defensive 
II. K scale  ® F scale - Infrequency. Very high possible random, exaggerated,  or mis-scored  profile.  I. Very high scores commonly  found with psychotic patients.  II. High scores best measure of overall  psychopathology, resentment,  acting out, and moodiness.  III. F scale  ® Validity scales  of MMPI  Most common test is the Minnesota  multiphasic  personality  test  § Personality  inventory:  The person is asked to complete a self-report  questionnaire  indicating  whether statements  assessing 
habitual tendencies  apply to him or her. 
- Psychological  test  The subjects perceptions  of inkblots  are recorded and then analyzed using psychological  interpretation    Rorschach inkblot  test  § It is known as the picture interpretation  technique  because it uses a series of provocative yet ambiguous pictures 
and the subject is asked to tell  a story
They are asked to tell  as dramatic  a story as they can for each picture.  What has led up to the event shown I. What is happening at the moment  II. What the characters  are feeling  and thinking  III. What the outcome of the story was  IV. Most of the common things asked are  Thematic apperception  test (TAT)  § Projective  tests  - Responses to ambiguous stimuli  reflect  unconscious processes § Projective  hypothesis  - Psychological  tests  Focus on aspects of environment  § Characteristic  of the person  § Frequency and form of problematic  behaviors  § Consequences of problem behaviors  § Behavioral assessments  are often conducted in lab setting  - Observe behavior as it occurs  - Antecedents and consequences  § Sequence of behavior divided into segments  - Ex: moods, stressful  evets, thoughts, etc…  Self-monitoring:  individuals  observe and record their  own behavior  § Involves the collection  of data in real time  as opposed to the more usual methods of having people reflect back 
over some time  period and report  on recently experienced  thoughts, moods, or stressors. 
Ecological momentary  assessment  (EMA)  § Self observation - Used to help plan treatment  targets  § Format often similar  to personality  test  § Identifies  negative  thought patterns  Dysfunctional  attitude  scale (DAS)  § Cognitive-style  questionnaires  - Behavioral & cognitive assessment  Helps to asses structural  brain abnormalities  A moving beam of x-rays passes a horizontal  cross section of the person's brain, scanning it through 360 
degrees; the moving x-ray detector  on the other side measures  the amount of radioactivity  that penetrates, 
detecting  subtle differences  in tissue  density. 
Computerized  axial tomography (CAT scan or CT) § Superior to the CAT scan because it gives a picture of much higher quality  and does not use even the smallest 
amount of radiation  that the CAT scan uses . 
The person is placed inside a large, circular  magnet, which causes the hydrogen atoms In the body to move. 
When the magnetic force is turned off, the atoms return to their original  positions,  which produces an 
electromagnetic  signal 
Magnetic resonance imaging  (MRI)  § Brain imaging  - Postmortem  studies  (Alzheimer's)  - Metabolite  levels:  Byproduct so neurotransmitter  breakdown found in urine, blood serum, or cerebral  fluid.  § May not reflect  the actual level of neurotransmitter  § Metabolite  assays  - Studies how brain abnormalities  affect  thinking, feeling,  and behavior  § Neuropsychologist  - Reveal performance  deficits  that can indicate areas of brain malfunction  § Tactile performance  test-time  Tactile performance  test-memory  Speech sounds perception test  Halstead-Reitan  battery  § Assesses motor skills,  tactile  and kinesthetic  skills,  verbal and spatial  skills,  expressive and receptive  speech  Luria-Nebraska battery  § Measures developed for one culture or ethnic group may not be valid or reliable  for another  Can lead to exaggerating or minimizing  psychological problems  Increase graduate student sensitivity  to cultural  issues  ® Strategies  to avoid the bias:  Cultural bias in assessment  § Make allowances for variations  in the use of personal space  Respectful of cultural  variations  of touch (hugging, kiss introductions,  etc…)  Adjust the communication  style  Expand roles and practices  as needed  Cultural responsiveness  § Neuropsychological  tests  - Neurobiological  Assessment Diagnosis & assessment  Chapter 4  The systematic  pursuit  of knowledge through observation    § Scientist  gather data to test theories  § Science: comes from the latin scire, "to know" - Means that a hypothesis is testable  by empirical  experiments,  and conforms  to the standard of scientific  method  A good theory is falsifiable § Theory: a set of propositions  meant to explain a class of observations  - Hypothesis: specific  predictions  about what will occur if a theory is correct  - Science and scientific  methods  Great source of hypothesis  § Can provide information  about novel cases or procedures  § Can disconfirm  a relationship  that was believed to be universal  § Cannot provide causal evidence because cannot rule out alternative  hypothesis  § Case study: collection  of detailed biographical  information  - May be biased by observer's theoretical  views  § Widely used because we cannot manipulate  many risk variables  or diagnosis  in psychopathology research  in humans  § Cannot determine  causality  because of the directionality  and third variable  problems  § Correlation:  Study of the relationship  between two or more variables;  measured as they exist in nature  - Best method for determining  causal relationships  § Experiment:  includes a manipulated  independent variable, a dependent variable,  preferably at least one control  group, and 
random assignment  group. 
- Detailed biographical  description  of an individual  § Rich description,  especially  helpful  for rare disorders  Generate hypothesis  Disprove hypothesis  Usefulness § Paradigm may influence observations  Cannot rule out alternative  explanations  Cannot prove hypothesis  Limitations  § Case study  - Ex: Do people who have more stress  have more headaches?  Studies questions of the form "Do variable X and variable Y vary together?" § Variables are measured but not manipulated  § Cannot determine  cause or effect  § The correlation  method  - Varies from -1.0 to +1.0 § Strength:  the high the absolute value, the stronger the relationship § Positive:  Higher scores on variable  X associated  with high score of variable  Y  Negative: Higher scores on variable  X associated with lower scores on variable  Y  Direction  § Large samples  increase likelihood  of significance  ® Can be influenced by number of participants  Statistical  significance § Is the association  meaningful  as well as statistically  significant?  Whether a relationship  between variables  is large enough to matter  Clinical  significance  § Correlation  does not imply causality  We do not know which variable  may cause the other  ® Variable X may cause variable Y  ® Variable Y may cause variable X  ® There may even be a third variable  not taken into account  ® Directionality  problem  Problems of causality  § Cross - sectional:  Causes and effects  are measured at the same point in time.  Follow large population  over time  ® High risk method: With this approach, only people who have the highest risk of developing a disorder  are 
included 
® Longitudinal:  examines whether causes are present  before disorder  develops  Longitudinal  vs. Cross-sectional  design  § Measuring correlation  - Study of the distribution  of disorders  in a population and possible  correlations  § Prevalence:  The proportion  of people with the disorder either  currently  or during their lifetime  § Incidence:  The proportion  of people who develop new cases of the disorder in a period of time, usually a year  § Increased risk of disease or infection  Ex: Obesity is a risk factor for high blood pressure  Risk factors:  Variables  that are related  to the likelihood  of developing the disorder  § Epidemiological  research  - Methods in psychopathology  Family method  § Twin method  § Adoptees method  § 50% shared genes  First degree relatives  (parents,  children, siblings)  § 25% shared genes  Second degree relatives  (aunts, uncles, grandparents)  § Sample of individuals  who psychopathology  Index cases/probands  § Family studies  - 100% shared genes  Monozygotic (MZ)/ Identical  twins  § 50% shared genes  Dizygotic (DZ)/ Fraternal  twins  § Similarity  of diagnosis  Concordance  § Twin studies  - In identical  twins, if one has schizophrenia,  the other has a 50% chance of getting it as well  § In fraternal  twins, it drops to 15%  § Schizophrenia twin method  - Methods to determine  genetic predisposition  (concordance)  to psychopathology  Adoption studies:  Study adoptees who have biological  parents  with psychopathology  - Cross-fostering:  Study of adoptees who have adoptive parents with psychopathology  - Behavioral genetics  Association studies:  Examine the relationship  between a specific  allele and a trait  or behavior in the population  - Molecular  genetics  Provides information  on causal relationships  - Hypothesis  - Null hypothesis:  No difference  between groups  - Random assignment  § Independent variable (manipulated)  § Dependent variable  (measured),  expected to vary with conditions  of the independent  variable.  § Involves:  - Can evaluate treatment  effectiveness  - Experimental  effect:  Differences between conditions  on the dependent variable  - Internal  validity:  Extent to which experimental  effect is due to independent variable  - Would results apply to others besides  the study participants?  § External validity:  Extent to which results  generalize beyond the study  - Treatment  manuals  § Placebo  Control group  § Double blind procedure  § Empirically  supported  treatments  - Exclusion of diverse populations  § Sample composition  - Efficacy:  Whether a treatment  works under the purest of conditions  § Effectiveness:  How well the treatment  works in the real world  § Efficacy and effectiveness  - Experiments  are not always possible  in psychopathology due to ethical  or practical  constraints  § Induce temporary  symptoms  College students who tend to be anxious or depressed  ® Recruit participants  with similarities  to diagnosable disorders  Animal research  Create or observe a related phenomenon - analogue - in the lab to allow more intensive  study  § Analogue experiment  - The experiment  Research methods in the study of psychopathology Abnormal Psychology Friday, February 3, 2017 5:07 PM
background image Exam 1 Study Guide  Introduction  & Historical  preview  Chapter 1  The study of mental disorders  It studies the nature, development, & treatment  of psychological disorders  Avoid preconceived notions  - Maintain  objectivity  - Reduce stigma  - Challenges to this  study include  Psychopathology  Emotional  pain & suffering  - Personal distress  Ex: Poor work performance  or serious  fight with ones spouse § Impairment  in some important  area of life  - Disability  Makes others uncomfortable  or causes problems  - Violation of social norms  The disorder occurs within the individual  - It involves clinically  proven significant  difficulties  in thinking,  feeling, or behaving  - It involves dysfunction in processes that support mental  functioning  - It is not a culturally  specific  reaction  to an event  - It is not mainly a result  of a problem  with society or social deviance  - When thinking of defining a mental  disorder one must also take these things into consideration:  Defining mental disorder  Distinguishing  label is applied  I. Label refers  to undesirable  attributes  II. People with the label  are seen as different  III. People with the label  are discriminated  against  IV. The four characteristics  of a stigma  are:  Stigma  Possession by evil being or spirits  / Exorcism  - Early Demonology  Mental disturbances  have natural  causes, they are not supernatural,  instead  they are due to problems  in the brain § Mania  I. Melancholia  II. Phrenitis  (Brain fever)  III. Three categories  of mental  disorders  § Blood  I. Black bile  II. Yellow bile  III. Phlegm IV. Normal brain functioning depend on balance of four humors § Hippocrates (5th century BC)  - Early Biological Explanations  Torture sometimes  led to delusional  sounding confessions  - Historians  have concluded that many of the accused were mentally  ill (little  support was found for this conclusion)  - Witches (13th century AD)  They were trials  held to determine  sanity   - Began in 13th century England  - Municipal  authorities  assumed responsibility  for care of mentally  ill  - "Lunacy" attributes  insanity  to misalignment  of moon (luna) and the stars  - Lunacy trials  They were established  for the care and confinement  of the mentally  ill in 15th century AD  - The institute  was called St. Mary of Bethlehem  § Wealthy people would pay to look at the insane  § One of the first  mental  institutions  was founded in 1243  - Treatment  in asylums  was either  non-existent  or harmful  to the patients  - promoted public health by advocating  for personal hygiene and a clean environment § Pioneered humanitarian  treatment  § Benjamin Rush - French physician  who was instrumental  in the development  of a more humane approach to the custody and care of 
psychiatric  patients.  This is referred  to as moral  therapy 
§ He also made contributions  to the classification  of mental  disorders and has been described by some as "father of 
modern psychiatry" 
§ Philippe Pinel (20 April 1745-25 October 1826) - Patients  engaged in calming  and purposeful activities    Talked with attendants  Small, privately  funded, humanitarian  hospitals  § Moral treatment - Asylums  Brief history of Psychopathology  Crusader for pioneers  and mentally  ill  - Urged improvement  of institutions  - Worked to establish  32 new, public  hospitals  - Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) (American  activists)  Psychological  (delusions and grandeur)  I. Physical symptoms  (progressive  paralysis)  II. Degenerative disorder  with psychological  symptoms  and physical symptoms  - It is a neuropsychiatric  disorder that  affects the brain  - Was originally  considered a psychiatric  disorder  when it was scientifically  identified  around the 19th century.  - Patient usually  presented with psychotic  symptoms  of sudden and often dramatic  onset.  - Since general paresis had biological  cause, other mental illness  might also have biological  causes  Biological  causes of psychopathology gained credibility  By mid-1800s it was known that general  paresis and syphilis  occurred together in some patients,  in 1905 the biological 
causes of syphilis  were found 
- General Paresis (syphilis)  Parents jointly  contribute  one half  I. Grandparents one quarter II. Great - grandparents one eighth….  Etc  III. His law states  that our heritage  is, on average, constituted  from that of our ancestors  according to the following proportions:  - Galton's (1822-1911) work lead to notion that mental  illness  can be inherited  Promotion  of enforced sterilization  to eliminate  undesirable  characteristics  from the population  - Many state  laws required mentally  ill  to be sterilized  - Eugenics The evolution of Contemporary thought Sakel (1930's)  - Insulin-coma  therapy  1938  - Used for schizophrenic  patients  § Induced epileptic  seizures with electric  shock  - Did NOT help them at all  - Does help severe depression  - Electroconvulsive  Therapy (ECT)  Moniz (1935)  - Often used to control violent  behaviors;  led to listlessness,  apathy, and loss of cognitive abilities  - Prefrontal  lobotomy  Early Biological treatments  Treated patients  with hysteria  - Using "animal magnetism"  - Early practitioner  of hypnosis  - Student: Charcot  - Mesmer (1734-1815)  Medical doctor (1825-1893)  - His support legitimizes  hypnosis as treatment  for hysteria  - Charcot  Anna O. was the pseudonym of a patient of Josef Breuer, who published her case study in his book "Studies on 
Hysteria", written in collaboration  with Sigmund Freud. 
§ Her real name was Bertha Pappenheim (1859-1936)  § She was an Austrian-Jewish  feminist  and the founder of the League of Jewish Women.  § Despite the Breuer and Freud's claims,  Anna O did NOT get better  from her treatment  with Breuer and was 
hospitalized  several  times afterward. 
§ She appeared to have neurological  problems  (perhaps epilepsy)  § Used hypnosis to facilitate  catharsis  in Anna O.  - Release of emotional  tension triggered  by reliving  and talking about event.  § Cathartic  method - Breuer (1842-1925)  Breuer and Freud jointly  published, "Studies in Hysteria" in 1895, which serves as the basis for Freud's theory. - Human behavior determined  by unconscious forces  § Psychopathology results  from conflicts  among these unconscious forces  § Freudian or Psychoanalytic  theory  - Composed of biological,  instinctual  drives  I. Innate (born with it)  II. Seeks immediate,  indiscriminant  gratification III. Source of mental energy  IV. Obeys the pleasure  principal:  pleasure is good, and nothing else matters.  V. Libido: biological  force (energy of ID)  VI. Thanatos: The death instinct  VII. Gratifying  urges returns  body to homeostasis  VIII. ID (Primal  desires/Basic  nature) § Organized, rational, reality-oriented  system  I. Develops first  2 years of life as infant experiences  reality  II. Holds id in check until  suitable object  is found  III. Helps id achieve gratification  within confines of reality  IV. Prevents id drives  from violating superego principles  V. Obeys the reality  principle:  Behavior takes into account the external  world  VI. Ego (Reason/Self control) § Learned  I. Inhibits  ("breaks") id urges  II. Strives for perfection  III. "Irrational"  operates on extremes good or bad  IV. Ego ideals - The person we'd like to be  V. Developed through rewards  VI. Conscience - right and wrong  VII. Developed though punishment  VIII. Formed around age 5 via Oedipal complex  resolution  IX. Superego (The quest for perfection)  § Freud's Structural  Model  - Freud (1856-1939) The evolution of contemporary thought Ego generates strategies  to protect itself  from  anxiety  § Defense mechanisms:  Psychological  maneuvers used to manage stress & anxiety  Conflict generates  anxiety  - Id, Ego, & Superego continually  in conflict  Repression: Keeping unacceptable impulses  or wishes from conscious awareness  - Denial: Not accepting a painful  reality  into conscious awareness  - Projection:  Attributing  to someone else one's own unacceptable  thoughts or feelings - Displacement:  Redirecting  emotional  responses from their  real target to someone else  - Reaction formation:  Converting an unacceptable feeling into its opposite  - Regression: Retreating  to the behavioral  patterns of an earlier  stage of development   - Rationalize:  Offering acceptable  reasons for an unacceptable action or attitude  - Sublimation:  Converting unacceptable aggressive  or sexual impulses  into socially valued behaviors  - Selected defense mechanisms  Defense Mechanisms  Understand early-childhood  experiences,  particularly  key (parental)  relationships  - Understand patterns in current relationships  - Goals of psychoanalytic therapy or psychoanalysis  The patient tries  to say whatever comes to mind without censoring  anything  Free Association  - Transference is a phenomenon characterized  by unconscious redirection  of feelings  from one person to another 
(patient  to therapist) 
The patient responds to the analyst  in ways that the patient  has previously  responded to other important  figures  in his 
or her life, and the analyst helps the patient  understand and interpret  these responses 
Analysis of transference  - The Liberation from  the conflict  (effects  of the unconscious material)  is achieved through bringing this material  into 
the conscious mind 
The analysts points out to the patient  the meaning of certain  of the patient's  behaviors  Interpretation  - Psychoanalytic  Techniques  Psychoanalytic  Therapy  Analytical  psychology  - Archetypes  According to Jungian Psychoanalysis,  the Great Mother archetype symbolizes  creativity,  birth,  fertility,  sexual 
union and nurturing.  She is a creative force not only for life, but also for art and ideas 
The mother figure  Collective  unconscious  - Jung (1875-1961) Childhood experiences help shape adult personality  - There are unconscious influences  on behavior  - Continuing influences  of Freud and his followers  Neo-Freudians  Focus on observable behavior  Emphasis on learning  rather than thinking  or innate tendencies  Behaviorism  - Classical  conditioning  Operant conditioning  Modeling  Three types of learning  - John Watson (1878-1958) In behaviorist  terms,  the dog's salivation  is known as an unconditioned  response ( a stimulus- response connection that 
required no learning) 
- Unconditioned stimulus  (Food) > Unconditioned response (salivation)  In behaviorist  terms  it is written  as:  - Pavlov showed the existence of the unconditioned  response by presenting a dog with a bowl of food and then measuring  its 
salivary  secretions 
- Pavlovian conditioning  (Pavlov's dogs)  Meat powder (automatically  elicits  salivation)  Unconditioned stimulus  (USC) - Salivation  (automatic  response to meat powder)  Unconditioned response (UR) - Initial  ringing of bell (does not automatically  elicit  salivation)  Neutral stimulus  (NS) - After pairing the NS and the UCS, the NS becomes a CS (bell  now automatically  elicits  salivation)  Conditioned stimulus  (CS) - Salivation  (automatic  response to bell)  Condition response (CR)  - CS (bell) not followed by USC (meat powder) causes gradual disappearance  of CR (salivation)  Extinction  - Discovered by Pavlov (1849-1936)  Principle  of reinforcement  Behaviors followed by pleasant stimuli  are strengthened  Positive  reinforcement  Behaviors that terminate  negative stimulus  are strengthened  Negative reinforcement  B.F Skinner (1904-1990)  - Operant Conditioning;  behavior that operates  on the environment  Can occur without reinforcement  Learning by watching and imitating  others behaviors  - Modeling reduced children's fear of dogs  Bandura & Menlove (1968)  - Modeling  Used to treat  phobias  Combines deep muscle relaxation  and gradual exposure to the feared condition  or object  Usually starts with minimal  anxiety producing condition  and gradually progresses  to more feared Systematic  desensitization  (imagine  what you fear while in deep relaxation) - Rewarding a behavior only occasionally  more effective  than continuous schedules of reinforcement  Intermittent  reinforcement  - Behavior Therapy or Behavior modification  The evolution of contemporary thought  How we think or appraise a situation  influences  our feelings and behaviors  - Limitations  of behavior therapy  Emphasizes how people think about themselves  and their  experiences can be a major  determinant  of psychopathology  - Focus on understanding  maladaptive  thoughts  - Change cognitions to change feelings  and behaviors  - Cognitive therapy  Importance  of cognitions  Chapter 2 A paradigm is a set of basic assumptions  that influence how you think about data  - Paradigms in psychopathology  Aim for objectivity  Goal: Study abnormal behavior scientifically.  - We can never really be objective;  subjective  factors  interfere Perspective  or conceptual framework  from within which a scientist  operates  Paradigm (Thomas Kuhn)  - Notion of a paradigm  Current Paradigms of psychopathology  Behavioral genetics  - Molecular  genetics  - Gene-environment  interactions  - Genetic paradigm  The Genetic paradigm  Carriers of genetic information  - Ex: relationships,  culture  Impacted by environment  influences  - Relationship  between genes and environment  is bidirectional  - Genes  Proteins influence  whether the action of a specific gene will occur  - Gene expression  Multiple  gene pairs vs. single gene  - A number of gene pairs combine their influences  to create a single (phenotypic)  trait  - Polygenic transmission  Extent to which variability  In behavior is due to genetic factors  - It estimates  range from 0.0 to 1.0, the higher the number, the greater the heritability  - Heritability  Heredity plays a role in most behavior  Ex: siblings  who are raised in the same environment,  by the same parents,  go to the same school, etc…  Events and experiences that family  members  have in common  - Shared environment  Ex: one sibling  might have been in a car accident but not the other Events and experiences that are unique to each family  member  - Nonshared environment  Environmental  effects  Study of the degree to which genes and environmental  factors  influence behavior  Genetic material  by an individual  - They are unobservable  - Consists of inherited genes  Genotype: The total  genetic makeup of a person  - Genotypes (unobservable)  Observable expression of the genes  Expressed genetic material  - Ex: Green eyes  Observable behavior or characteristics  - Depends on interaction  of genotype and environment  - Phenotype (observable)  Behavior genetics  The field of biology and genetics  that studies the structure  and function of genes at a molecular  level  *Remember APOE, allele 4 associated  with AD Different  in DNA sequence on a gene occurring in a population Alleles  - Difference in DNA sequence on a gene occurring  in a population  Polymorphism  - Refers to differences  between people In a single nucleotide  in the DNA sequence of a particular  gene.  One area of interest  in the study of gene sequence involves identifying  what are called single nucleotide  polymorphisms  or 
SNPs 
- A CNV can be present in a single gene or multiple  genes. The name refers  to an abnormal  copy of one or more 
sections  of DNA within the gene(s).
Another area of interest  is the study of differences  between people in gene culture,  including the identification  of what are
called copy number variations  (CNVs) 
- Identifies  particular  genes and their  functions  Molecular  genetics  An example would be if a person has gene XYZ, he or she might respond to a snake bite by developing a fear of snakes. 
Another person without gene XYZ would not have developed a fear of snakes after  being bitten. 
- Another example  would  be depression  - One's response to a specific  environmental  event is influenced by genes Researchers had found that those with either the short-short  allele  or the short-long  allele combinations  of the 5-HTT 
gene  
This shows how it was a combination  of the genes and the environment.  I. and  were maltreated  as children were most  likely to have major depressive disorder  as adults than either those people 
who had the gene combination  but where not maltreated  as children  or those who had the long-long allele  but where 
also maltreated  as children. 
This gene has a polymorphism  such that some people have two short alleles  (short-short),  some have two long alleles (long-
long) and some have one short one long (long-short). 
- Serotonin transporter  gene (5-HTT)  The study of the phenotypic trait  variations  caused by environmental  factors  that switch genes on and off - Epigenetics  Ex: A genetic risk for alcohol use disorder may predispose persons to life events that put them in high risk situations 
for alcohol use such as being in trouble with the law. 
The basic idea is that genes may predispose us to seek out certain  environments  that then increase  our risk to developing a 
particular  disorder. 
- Reciprocal gene-environment  interactions  Gene-Environment  Interaction Examines the contribution  of brain structure  and function to psychopathology  - The neuroscience paradigm  holds that mental  disorders  are linked to aberrant processes in the brain.  Neurons and neurotransmitters  I. Brain structure and function  II. Neuroendocrine system III. Three major  components are:  Cell body  I. Dendrites  II. Axons  III. Terminal  buttons  IV. Four major parts  include:  Neurons: cells of the nervous system  - Nerve impulse:  Occurs when a neuron is appropriately  stimulated  at its cell body or through its dendrites.  It travels down 
the axon to the terminal  endings. 
- Synapse: Between the terminal  endings of the sending axon and the cell membrane of the receiving  neuron.  - Neurons   Chemicals that allow neurons to send a signal across the synapse to another neuron  - Excitatory:  Leading to the creation  of a nerve impulse  in the postsynaptic  neuron  I. Inhibitory:  Making the postsynaptic  cell less likely to create a nerve impulse.  II. Receptor sites on postsynaptic  neuron absorb neurotransmitter  which can either  be:  - Reuptake: Reabsorption of leftover  neurotransmitter  by presynaptic  neuron  - Implicated  In depression, mania, and schizophrenia  Serotonin and dopamine  Implicated  in anxiety and other stress-related  disorders  Norepinephrine  Inhibits  nerve impulses  Implicated  in anxiety  Gamma-aminobutyric  acid (GABA)  Several key neurotransmitters  are:  - Excessive or inadequate levels  Insufficient  reuptake  Excessive number or hypersensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  Possible mechanisms:  - Once they are released, they play a role in adjusting the sensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  to dopamine, 
norepinephrine,  or serotonin. 
When a cell has been firing more frequently,  this receptor  releases second messengers.  - Ex: A serotonin agonist is a drug that  stimulates  serotonin receptors  to produce the same effects  as serotonin  does 
naturally. 
Agonist: A drug that stimulates  a particular  neurotransmitter's  receptors.  - Ex: Many drugs used to treat schizophrenia  are dopamine antagonists  that work by blocking dopamine receptors.  Antagonist:  A drug that works on a neurotransmitter's  receptors to dampen the activity  of that neurotransmitter  - Neurotransmitter  HPA axis involved in stress  - Hypothalamus triggers  release of corticotrophin-releasing  hormone (CRF)  - Pituitary  gland releases adrenocorticotropic  hormone (ACTH) - Adrenal cortex triggers  release  of cortisol,  the stress hormone  - The HPA axis of the neuroendocrine  system  Antidepressants  Antipsychotics  Benzodiazepines  Psychoactive drugs alter neurotransmitter  activity  - A neuroscience view does not preclude psychological  interventions  - Neuroscience approaches to treatment  Reductionism:  View that behavior can best be understood by reducing it to its  basic biological  components  - Evaluating the neuroscience paradigm  Current paradigms:  Neuroscience  Roots in learning principles  and cognitive  science  Getting attention  - Escape or avoidance  - Sensory stimulation  - Access to desirable objects  or events  - Behavior is reinforced  by consequences such as:  Strengthens responses  - Ex: Giving a dog a treat after she sits.  Presents something  pleasant after  a behavior is emitted  - Positive  reinforcement  All behavior is determined  by our reinforcement  history  - B.F Skinner  Ex: Time- out, when a child behaves incorrectly  and as a consequence is sent for a period of time to a location  with no 
positive  reinforcement. 
- In order to alter  behavior, one must modify consequences  Relaxation plus imagined exposure  - Important  treatment  for anxiety disorders  - Driving to clinic  1. Entering treatment  room  2. Seeing clinic nurse  3. Train patient to associate alternative  response (ex: deep muscle relaxation)  with these events.  § Construct hierarchy  of events related to original  stimulus  which elicits  the maladaptive  response for each patient  - Systematic  desensitization  A treatment  to systematically  increase exposure to positive activities,  and thereby improve affect  and corresponding 
cognitions. 
- Behavioral activation  (for depression) Behaviorism  criticized  for ignoring thoughts and emotions  - Cognitive science focuses on how people (and animals)  structure  their experiences,  how they make sense of them, and how 
they relate their current  experiences to past ones that have been stored in memory. 
- Perceiving, recognizing,  conceiving, judging, and reasoning  § A mental process that includes:  - Organized network of previously  accumulated  knowledge  § We actively  interpret  new information  § Schema (cognitive schema)  - Anxious individuals  more likely to attend to threat or danger § Role of attention in psychopathology  - Cognitive science  What is important  is the cognitive process, not the behavior  - Learners are not passive responders to the environmental  stimuli  - Learners are actively  making mental  connections between new information  and old information.  - Learners organize their knowledge into categories  and connected networks.  - Cognitive paradigm  Attends to thoughts, perceptions,  judgments,  self-statements,  and unconscious assumptions  - Incorporates  theory and research on cognitive  processes.  - Change a pattern of thinking  § Changes in thinking  can change feelings,  behaviors, and symptoms  § Cognitive reconstructing  - Cognitive behavior therapy  Initially  developed for depression  - Beck developed a cognitive therapy for depression based on the idea that depressed mood is caused by distortions  In the 
way people perceive life  events 
- Attention, interpretation,  and recall of negative and positive  information  biased in depression  § Information-processing  bias  - Help patients  recognize and change their  negative thought patterns - Beck's cognitive therapy  Focus is on current determinants  of disorder  and less on historical,  childhood antecedents.  - Answer is still  unclear  § Are distorted  thoughts the cause or the result  of psychopathology?  - Evaluating the CBT paradigm  Cognitive paradigms:  Cognitive behavioral  Influence how we respond to problems and challenges  in our environment  - Help us organize our thoughts and actions, both explicitly  and implicitly  - Guide our behavior  - Expressive  § Experiential  § Physiological  § Components:  - Emotions Disturbances in emotion is key to several  disorders  Ex: Flat affect in schizophrenia  (a severe reduction  in emotional  expressiveness)  § Most psychopathology includes disturbances  of one or more component  - Americans value happiness more as someone from another culture,  for example East Asian cultures,  like China, 
value calmness more than happiness 
Western vs. Eastern philosophy  § Ideal effect:  Refers to the kinds of emotional  states that a person ideally wants to feel  - Emotional  dysregulation  Gender, race, culture, ethnicity,  and socioeconomics  status  § Ex: Women more likely to experience  depression than men.  May increase  vulnerability  to psychopathology  § Sociocultural  factors  - Factors that cut across the paradigms  Object relations  theory: Stresses the importance  for long-standing  patterns in close relationships,  particularly  within 
the family. 
§ Attachment  theory: The type of style of an infant's  attachment  to his or her caregiver can set the stage for 
psychological  health or problems  later in life 
§ Stresses  the importance  of interpersonal  relationships  - Interpersonal  psychotherapy  (IPT) focuses upon improving  problematic  interpersonal  relationships - Unsolved grief:  Grief which is either  delayed and experienced long after the loss  I. Role disputes:  The patient and significant  people in his life have different  expectations about their relationships  II. Role transitions:  Depression may occur during life transitions  when a person's role changes and he doesn’t know how 
to cope with the change 
III. Interpersonal  deficits:  This may be an area of focus if the patient  has had problems  with forming  and maintaining   
good quality relationships. 
IV. Four basic problems  recognized by IPT  - Interpersonal   theory  Genetic, neurobiological,  psychological,  and environmental  § Integrative  model that incorporates  multiple  causal factors  - May be biological  or psychological  (gene or cognitive  style)  Underlying predisposition  § Increase one's risk of developing disorder  § Diathesis  - May occur at any point after  conception  Triggering event  Environmental  events  § Death of spouse  Divorce  Marital  separation  Jail term  Death of family  member  Personal injury or illness  Marriage  Fired at wok  Most common stressors  include  § Stress  - Diathesis-Stress  Current paradigms:  The factors that cut across paradigms  (trans-diagnostic)  Chapter 3 The classification  of disorders by symptoms  and signs - Diagnosis  Facilitates  communication  among professionals  about cases and research  - Advances the search for causes and treatments  - Cornerstone of clinical  care  - Helps in specifying appropriate  treatment - Advantages of diagnosis include the following  Inter-rater:  Refers to the degree to which two independent observers  agree on what they have observed.  Test-retest:  Similarity  of scores across repeated test  administrations  or observations Alternate form  reliability:  Similarity  of scored on tests  that are similar  but not identical  Internal  consistency:  Asses whether the items  on a test are related to one another Consistency of measurement  is assessed  by these different  types of reliabilities:  § Reliability:  Consists of measurement  - Just because something  is reliable  does not mean it is always valid  § Ex: The item on the test represent  the entire  range of possible items  the test  should cover  Content validity:  Extent to which a measure  adequately samples  the domain of interest  § If both variable  are measured at the same point in time, the resulting  validity  is referred  to as concurrent validity.  Alternatively,  criterion  validity  can be assessed by evaluating  the ability  of the measure to predict some other 
variable that is measured at some point in the future, often referred to as predictive  validity. 
Criterion  validity:  Evaluated by determining  whether a measure is associated  in an expected way with some other 
measures (the criterion) 
§ Involves correlating  multiple  indirect  measures of the attributes.  a) Construct:  An abstract  concept or inferred  attribute,  such as anxiousness or distorted  cognition.  I. Construct validity:  The degree to which a test measures what it claims,  or purports, to be measuring § In medicine  and statistics,  gold standard  usually refers to a diagnostic  test or benchmark that is the best available 
under reasonable  conditions. 
Other times  it is used to refer to the most accurate test possible  Gold standard  § Extent to which clinicians  agree on the diagnoses  Interrater  reliability  § Validity:  Related to whether a measure measures  what it is supposed to measure.  - The concepts of reliability  and validity  are the cornerstones  of any diagnostic or assessment  procedure.  First published in 1952  § Diagnostic and statistical  manual of mental  disorders (DSM) published by American psychiatric  association - Axis I: Clinical  Disorders  § Axis II: Developmental  disorders  and personality  disorders  § Axis III:  General medical  disorders  § Axis IV: Psychosocial and Environmental  problems  § Axis V: Global assessment  of functioning  scale (GAF scale)  § Multiaxial  classification  system DSM-IV-TR and likely  DSM-5  - In DSM-5 they are likely  to be reduced to one axis for clinical  syndrome and one for psychosocial  and environmental 
problems. 
- Classification  and Diagnosis  Either you are anxious or you are not anxious  Presence/absence  of a disorder  § Categorical  (DSM)  - Describes the degree of an entity that is present  How anxious are you from a scale  of 1 to 10?  Rank on a continuous quantitative  dimension  § Dimensional  (not DSM)  - Categorical  vs. Dimensional  systems of diagnosis  Mental illness  is universal  - The persons availability  of treatment  § Willingness  for one to seek help  § Types of symptoms  experienced  § Risk factors  § Culture can influence:  - The DSM includes 25 culture bound syndromes  in the appendix. Culture bound syndromes  are diagnoses that are likely to 
be seen within specific  regions.
- Ethical and Cultural  considerations  Ex: Depression after the death of a loved one  Should relatively  common reactions  be pathologized? (treated  as psychologically  abnormal or unhealthy)  § Too many diagnoses?  - Refers to the presence of a second diagnoses  § Some argue that this overlap Is a sign that we are dividing syndromes too finely.  45% of people diagnosed with one disorder will meet criteria  for a second disorder  § Comorbidity  - Criticism  of the DSM  Construct validity  is of highest concern - For most disorders,  there is no lab test available  to diagnose with certainty    § Diagnoses are constructs:  - Possible etiological  causes (past)  § Clinical  characteristics  (current)  § Predict treatment  response (future)  § Strong constructs validity  predicts  wide range of characteristics  - Construct validity  of diagnostic  categories  Treated differently  by others  § Difficulty  finding a job  § Stigma against  mental illness  - The disorder does not define the person  § She is an individual  with schizophrenia,  not a "schizophrenic"  § Categories do not capture the uniqueness  of a person  - Relevant information  may be overlooked  § Classification  may emphasize  trivial  similarities  - Criticisms  of classification  Described client's problem  § Determined causes of the problem  § Arrived at diagnoses  § Develop a treatment  strategy  § Monitor treatment  progress  § Conducting valid research  § Techniques employed to"  - Interviews  § Personality  inventories  § Intelligence  tests  § Ideal assessment  involves multiple  measures and methods  - Psychological  assessment  In these interviews,  the interviewer  pays close attention  to how the patient  answers the questions, how they don’t.  - They check to see if the response is accompanied by appropriate  emotion  - Informal  / less structured  interviews  - Empathy and accepting attitude  is very important  - Reliability  lower than for a structured  interview  - Clinical  interviews  All interviewers  ask the same questions  in a predetermined  order  - Very structured  - Good interrater  reliability  for most diagnostic  categories § Most symptoms  are rated on a three-point  scale  § Structured  clinical  interview for Axis I of DMS (SCID)  - Structured  interview  Yields profile of psychological functioning  Specific subscales  to detect lying and faking  Personality  tests  § Asses current  mental ability  Wechsler adult intelligence  scale (WAIS) ® Wechsler intelligence  scale for children (WISC)  ® Wechsler preschool  and primary scale for children, 3rd ed. (WPPSI-III)  ® Wechsler scales  Information  (general  knowledge)  Comprehension:  asks questions  designed to measure practical  knowledge and understanding of social rules and 
concepts 
Arithmetic:  requires solving series  of arithmetic  problems.  The examinee  must solve problems mentally,  without 
the use of pencil or paper, and respond orally within a time  limit. 
Used to predict  performance, diagnose learning  disabilities  or intellectual  developmental  disorder (mental 
retardation),  identify gifted  children. 
® Standord-Binet  Intelligence  tests  § The two most common psychological  tests are  - Asses personality  traits  and psychopathology  Primarily  intended to test people who are suspected of having mental  health or other clinical  issues  `Scale 1 - Hypochondriasis:  This scale  was designed to asses a neurotic concern over bodily functioning. 
Items  on this  scale include somatic  symptoms and physical  well being. 
® Scale 2 - Depression: This scale was originally  designed to identify  depression, characterized  by poor 
morale, lack of hope in future, and a general dissatisfaction  with one's own life situation 
® Scale 3 -  Hysteria:  The third  scale was originally  designed to identify  those who display hysteria  in 
stressful  situations.   
® Scale 4 - Psychopathic disorder:  Originally  developed to identify  psychopathic patients:  Originally 
developed to identify  psychopathic patients,  this scale measures  social deviation,  lack of acceptance of 
authority,  and morality.  Can be thought of as a scale of disobedience 
® Scale 5 - Masculinity/Femininity:  This scale was designed by the original  author's to identify  homosexual 
tendencies, but was found to be largely ineffective. 
® Scale 6 - Paranoia: This scale was originally  developed to Identify  patients  with paranoid symptoms  such 
as suspiciousness,  feelings  of persecution,  grandiose self-concepts,  excessive sensitivity,  and rigid 
attitudes. 
® Scale 7 - Psychasthenia:  This diagnostic  is no longer used today and the symptoms  described on this  scale 
are more reflective  of obsessive-compulsive  disorder. Was originally  used to measure  excessive doubts, 
compulsions,  obsessions etc.. 
® Scale 8 - Schizophrenia:  This scale was originally  developed to identify schizophrenic  patients  and reflects 
a wide variety  of areas including bizarre  thought processes and peculiar perceptions,  social  alienation,  poor 
familial  relationships,  difficulties  in concentration  and impulse  control, lack of deep interests,  disturbing 
questions of self-worth and self-identity,  and sexual difficulties.
® Scale 9 - Hypomania: This scale was developed to identify characteristics  of hypomania such as elevated 
mood, accelerated  speech and motor activity,  irritability,  flight  of ideas, and brief periods of depression 
® Scale 0 - Social introversion:  This scale was developed later than the other nine scales, its designed to 
assess a person's tendency to withdraw from social contacts 
® MMPI Scales  ? Scale - Cannot say (MMPI/MMPI-2).  A tally of omitted  items. High scores may be due to 
obsessiveness,  defensiveness,  difficulty  in reading, confusion, hostility,  or paranoia. Twenty or more 
unanswered should be considered significant 
I. Lie scales?  ® K Scale - Defensiveness.  K is a subtle and valuable correction  for defensiveness.  I. Assumes psychopathology. Is someone with a history  of psychopathology problems  scores high, then 
they are being defensive 
II. K scale  ® F scale - Infrequency. Very high possible random, exaggerated,  or mis-scored  profile.  I. Very high scores commonly  found with psychotic patients.  II. High scores best measure of overall  psychopathology, resentment,  acting out, and moodiness.  III. F scale  ® Validity scales  of MMPI  Most common test is the Minnesota  multiphasic  personality  test  § Personality  inventory:  The person is asked to complete a self-report  questionnaire  indicating  whether statements  assessing 
habitual tendencies  apply to him or her. 
- Psychological  test  The subjects perceptions  of inkblots  are recorded and then analyzed using psychological  interpretation    Rorschach inkblot  test  § It is known as the picture interpretation  technique  because it uses a series of provocative yet ambiguous pictures 
and the subject is asked to tell  a story
They are asked to tell  as dramatic  a story as they can for each picture.  What has led up to the event shown I. What is happening at the moment  II. What the characters  are feeling  and thinking  III. What the outcome of the story was  IV. Most of the common things asked are  Thematic apperception  test (TAT)  § Projective  tests  - Responses to ambiguous stimuli  reflect  unconscious processes § Projective  hypothesis  - Psychological  tests  Focus on aspects of environment  § Characteristic  of the person  § Frequency and form of problematic  behaviors  § Consequences of problem behaviors  § Behavioral assessments  are often conducted in lab setting  - Observe behavior as it occurs  - Antecedents and consequences  § Sequence of behavior divided into segments  - Ex: moods, stressful  evets, thoughts, etc…  Self-monitoring:  individuals  observe and record their  own behavior  § Involves the collection  of data in real time  as opposed to the more usual methods of having people reflect back 
over some time  period and report  on recently experienced  thoughts, moods, or stressors. 
Ecological momentary  assessment  (EMA)  § Self observation - Used to help plan treatment  targets  § Format often similar  to personality  test  § Identifies  negative  thought patterns  Dysfunctional  attitude  scale (DAS)  § Cognitive-style  questionnaires  - Behavioral & cognitive assessment  Helps to asses structural  brain abnormalities  A moving beam of x-rays passes a horizontal  cross section of the person's brain, scanning it through 360 
degrees; the moving x-ray detector  on the other side measures  the amount of radioactivity  that penetrates, 
detecting  subtle differences  in tissue  density. 
Computerized  axial tomography (CAT scan or CT) § Superior to the CAT scan because it gives a picture of much higher quality  and does not use even the smallest 
amount of radiation  that the CAT scan uses . 
The person is placed inside a large, circular  magnet, which causes the hydrogen atoms In the body to move. 
When the magnetic force is turned off, the atoms return to their original  positions,  which produces an 
electromagnetic  signal 
Magnetic resonance imaging  (MRI)  § Brain imaging  - Postmortem  studies  (Alzheimer's)  - Metabolite  levels:  Byproduct so neurotransmitter  breakdown found in urine, blood serum, or cerebral  fluid.  § May not reflect  the actual level of neurotransmitter  § Metabolite  assays  - Studies how brain abnormalities  affect  thinking, feeling,  and behavior  § Neuropsychologist  - Reveal performance  deficits  that can indicate areas of brain malfunction  § Tactile performance  test-time  Tactile performance  test-memory  Speech sounds perception test  Halstead-Reitan  battery  § Assesses motor skills,  tactile  and kinesthetic  skills,  verbal and spatial  skills,  expressive and receptive  speech  Luria-Nebraska battery  § Measures developed for one culture or ethnic group may not be valid or reliable  for another  Can lead to exaggerating or minimizing  psychological problems  Increase graduate student sensitivity  to cultural  issues  ® Strategies  to avoid the bias:  Cultural bias in assessment  § Make allowances for variations  in the use of personal space  Respectful of cultural  variations  of touch (hugging, kiss introductions,  etc…)  Adjust the communication  style  Expand roles and practices  as needed  Cultural responsiveness  § Neuropsychological  tests  - Neurobiological  Assessment Diagnosis & assessment  Chapter 4  The systematic  pursuit  of knowledge through observation    § Scientist  gather data to test theories  § Science: comes from the latin scire, "to know" - Means that a hypothesis is testable  by empirical  experiments,  and conforms  to the standard of scientific  method  A good theory is falsifiable § Theory: a set of propositions  meant to explain a class of observations  - Hypothesis: specific  predictions  about what will occur if a theory is correct  - Science and scientific  methods  Great source of hypothesis  § Can provide information  about novel cases or procedures  § Can disconfirm  a relationship  that was believed to be universal  § Cannot provide causal evidence because cannot rule out alternative  hypothesis  § Case study: collection  of detailed biographical  information  - May be biased by observer's theoretical  views  § Widely used because we cannot manipulate  many risk variables  or diagnosis  in psychopathology research  in humans  § Cannot determine  causality  because of the directionality  and third variable  problems  § Correlation:  Study of the relationship  between two or more variables;  measured as they exist in nature  - Best method for determining  causal relationships  § Experiment:  includes a manipulated  independent variable, a dependent variable,  preferably at least one control  group, and 
random assignment  group. 
- Detailed biographical  description  of an individual  § Rich description,  especially  helpful  for rare disorders  Generate hypothesis  Disprove hypothesis  Usefulness § Paradigm may influence observations  Cannot rule out alternative  explanations  Cannot prove hypothesis  Limitations  § Case study  - Ex: Do people who have more stress  have more headaches?  Studies questions of the form "Do variable X and variable Y vary together?" § Variables are measured but not manipulated  § Cannot determine  cause or effect  § The correlation  method  - Varies from -1.0 to +1.0 § Strength:  the high the absolute value, the stronger the relationship § Positive:  Higher scores on variable  X associated  with high score of variable  Y  Negative: Higher scores on variable  X associated with lower scores on variable  Y  Direction  § Large samples  increase likelihood  of significance  ® Can be influenced by number of participants  Statistical  significance § Is the association  meaningful  as well as statistically  significant?  Whether a relationship  between variables  is large enough to matter  Clinical  significance  § Correlation  does not imply causality  We do not know which variable  may cause the other  ® Variable X may cause variable Y  ® Variable Y may cause variable X  ® There may even be a third variable  not taken into account  ® Directionality  problem  Problems of causality  § Cross - sectional:  Causes and effects  are measured at the same point in time.  Follow large population  over time  ® High risk method: With this approach, only people who have the highest risk of developing a disorder  are 
included 
® Longitudinal:  examines whether causes are present  before disorder  develops  Longitudinal  vs. Cross-sectional  design  § Measuring correlation  - Study of the distribution  of disorders  in a population and possible  correlations  § Prevalence:  The proportion  of people with the disorder either  currently  or during their lifetime  § Incidence:  The proportion  of people who develop new cases of the disorder in a period of time, usually a year  § Increased risk of disease or infection  Ex: Obesity is a risk factor for high blood pressure  Risk factors:  Variables  that are related  to the likelihood  of developing the disorder  § Epidemiological  research  - Methods in psychopathology  Family method  § Twin method  § Adoptees method  § 50% shared genes  First degree relatives  (parents,  children, siblings)  § 25% shared genes  Second degree relatives  (aunts, uncles, grandparents)  § Sample of individuals  who psychopathology  Index cases/probands  § Family studies  - 100% shared genes  Monozygotic (MZ)/ Identical  twins  § 50% shared genes  Dizygotic (DZ)/ Fraternal  twins  § Similarity  of diagnosis  Concordance  § Twin studies  - In identical  twins, if one has schizophrenia,  the other has a 50% chance of getting it as well  § In fraternal  twins, it drops to 15%  § Schizophrenia twin method  - Methods to determine  genetic predisposition  (concordance)  to psychopathology  Adoption studies:  Study adoptees who have biological  parents  with psychopathology  - Cross-fostering:  Study of adoptees who have adoptive parents with psychopathology  - Behavioral genetics  Association studies:  Examine the relationship  between a specific  allele and a trait  or behavior in the population  - Molecular  genetics  Provides information  on causal relationships  - Hypothesis  - Null hypothesis:  No difference  between groups  - Random assignment  § Independent variable (manipulated)  § Dependent variable  (measured),  expected to vary with conditions  of the independent  variable.  § Involves:  - Can evaluate treatment  effectiveness  - Experimental  effect:  Differences between conditions  on the dependent variable  - Internal  validity:  Extent to which experimental  effect is due to independent variable  - Would results apply to others besides  the study participants?  § External validity:  Extent to which results  generalize beyond the study  - Treatment  manuals  § Placebo  Control group  § Double blind procedure  § Empirically  supported  treatments  - Exclusion of diverse populations  § Sample composition  - Efficacy:  Whether a treatment  works under the purest of conditions  § Effectiveness:  How well the treatment  works in the real world  § Efficacy and effectiveness  - Experiments  are not always possible  in psychopathology due to ethical  or practical  constraints  § Induce temporary  symptoms  College students who tend to be anxious or depressed  ® Recruit participants  with similarities  to diagnosable disorders  Animal research  Create or observe a related phenomenon - analogue - in the lab to allow more intensive  study  § Analogue experiment  - The experiment  Research methods in the study of psychopathology Abnormal Psychology Friday, February 3, 2017 5:07 PM
background image Exam 1 Study Guide  Introduction  & Historical  preview  Chapter 1  The study of mental disorders  It studies the nature, development, & treatment  of psychological disorders  Avoid preconceived notions  - Maintain  objectivity  - Reduce stigma  - Challenges to this  study include  Psychopathology  Emotional  pain & suffering  - Personal distress  Ex: Poor work performance  or serious  fight with ones spouse § Impairment  in some important  area of life  - Disability  Makes others uncomfortable  or causes problems  - Violation of social norms  The disorder occurs within the individual  - It involves clinically  proven significant  difficulties  in thinking,  feeling, or behaving  - It involves dysfunction in processes that support mental  functioning  - It is not a culturally  specific  reaction  to an event  - It is not mainly a result  of a problem  with society or social deviance  - When thinking of defining a mental  disorder one must also take these things into consideration:  Defining mental disorder  Distinguishing  label is applied  I. Label refers  to undesirable  attributes  II. People with the label  are seen as different  III. People with the label  are discriminated  against  IV. The four characteristics  of a stigma  are:  Stigma  Possession by evil being or spirits  / Exorcism  - Early Demonology  Mental disturbances  have natural  causes, they are not supernatural,  instead  they are due to problems  in the brain § Mania  I. Melancholia  II. Phrenitis  (Brain fever)  III. Three categories  of mental  disorders  § Blood  I. Black bile  II. Yellow bile  III. Phlegm IV. Normal brain functioning depend on balance of four humors § Hippocrates (5th century BC)  - Early Biological Explanations  Torture sometimes  led to delusional  sounding confessions  - Historians  have concluded that many of the accused were mentally  ill (little  support was found for this conclusion)  - Witches (13th century AD)  They were trials  held to determine  sanity   - Began in 13th century England  - Municipal  authorities  assumed responsibility  for care of mentally  ill  - "Lunacy" attributes  insanity  to misalignment  of moon (luna) and the stars  - Lunacy trials  They were established  for the care and confinement  of the mentally  ill in 15th century AD  - The institute  was called St. Mary of Bethlehem  § Wealthy people would pay to look at the insane  § One of the first  mental  institutions  was founded in 1243  - Treatment  in asylums  was either  non-existent  or harmful  to the patients  - promoted public health by advocating  for personal hygiene and a clean environment § Pioneered humanitarian  treatment  § Benjamin Rush - French physician  who was instrumental  in the development  of a more humane approach to the custody and care of 
psychiatric  patients.  This is referred  to as moral  therapy 
§ He also made contributions  to the classification  of mental  disorders and has been described by some as "father of 
modern psychiatry" 
§ Philippe Pinel (20 April 1745-25 October 1826) - Patients  engaged in calming  and purposeful activities    Talked with attendants  Small, privately  funded, humanitarian  hospitals  § Moral treatment - Asylums  Brief history of Psychopathology  Crusader for pioneers  and mentally  ill  - Urged improvement  of institutions  - Worked to establish  32 new, public  hospitals  - Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) (American  activists)  Psychological  (delusions and grandeur)  I. Physical symptoms  (progressive  paralysis)  II. Degenerative disorder  with psychological  symptoms  and physical symptoms  - It is a neuropsychiatric  disorder that  affects the brain  - Was originally  considered a psychiatric  disorder  when it was scientifically  identified  around the 19th century.  - Patient usually  presented with psychotic  symptoms  of sudden and often dramatic  onset.  - Since general paresis had biological  cause, other mental illness  might also have biological  causes  Biological  causes of psychopathology gained credibility  By mid-1800s it was known that general  paresis and syphilis  occurred together in some patients,  in 1905 the biological 
causes of syphilis  were found 
- General Paresis (syphilis)  Parents jointly  contribute  one half  I. Grandparents one quarter II. Great - grandparents one eighth….  Etc  III. His law states  that our heritage  is, on average, constituted  from that of our ancestors  according to the following proportions:  - Galton's (1822-1911) work lead to notion that mental  illness  can be inherited  Promotion  of enforced sterilization  to eliminate  undesirable  characteristics  from the population  - Many state  laws required mentally  ill  to be sterilized  - Eugenics The evolution of Contemporary thought Sakel (1930's)  - Insulin-coma  therapy  1938  - Used for schizophrenic  patients  § Induced epileptic  seizures with electric  shock  - Did NOT help them at all  - Does help severe depression  - Electroconvulsive  Therapy (ECT)  Moniz (1935)  - Often used to control violent  behaviors;  led to listlessness,  apathy, and loss of cognitive abilities  - Prefrontal  lobotomy  Early Biological treatments  Treated patients  with hysteria  - Using "animal magnetism"  - Early practitioner  of hypnosis  - Student: Charcot  - Mesmer (1734-1815)  Medical doctor (1825-1893)  - His support legitimizes  hypnosis as treatment  for hysteria  - Charcot  Anna O. was the pseudonym of a patient of Josef Breuer, who published her case study in his book "Studies on 
Hysteria", written in collaboration  with Sigmund Freud. 
§ Her real name was Bertha Pappenheim (1859-1936)  § She was an Austrian-Jewish  feminist  and the founder of the League of Jewish Women.  § Despite the Breuer and Freud's claims,  Anna O did NOT get better  from her treatment  with Breuer and was 
hospitalized  several  times afterward. 
§ She appeared to have neurological  problems  (perhaps epilepsy)  § Used hypnosis to facilitate  catharsis  in Anna O.  - Release of emotional  tension triggered  by reliving  and talking about event.  § Cathartic  method - Breuer (1842-1925)  Breuer and Freud jointly  published, "Studies in Hysteria" in 1895, which serves as the basis for Freud's theory. - Human behavior determined  by unconscious forces  § Psychopathology results  from conflicts  among these unconscious forces  § Freudian or Psychoanalytic  theory  - Composed of biological,  instinctual  drives  I. Innate (born with it)  II. Seeks immediate,  indiscriminant  gratification III. Source of mental energy  IV. Obeys the pleasure  principal:  pleasure is good, and nothing else matters.  V. Libido: biological  force (energy of ID)  VI. Thanatos: The death instinct  VII. Gratifying  urges returns  body to homeostasis  VIII. ID (Primal  desires/Basic  nature) § Organized, rational, reality-oriented  system  I. Develops first  2 years of life as infant experiences  reality  II. Holds id in check until  suitable object  is found  III. Helps id achieve gratification  within confines of reality  IV. Prevents id drives  from violating superego principles  V. Obeys the reality  principle:  Behavior takes into account the external  world  VI. Ego (Reason/Self control) § Learned  I. Inhibits  ("breaks") id urges  II. Strives for perfection  III. "Irrational"  operates on extremes good or bad  IV. Ego ideals - The person we'd like to be  V. Developed through rewards  VI. Conscience - right and wrong  VII. Developed though punishment  VIII. Formed around age 5 via Oedipal complex  resolution  IX. Superego (The quest for perfection)  § Freud's Structural  Model  - Freud (1856-1939) The evolution of contemporary thought Ego generates strategies  to protect itself  from  anxiety  § Defense mechanisms:  Psychological  maneuvers used to manage stress & anxiety  Conflict generates  anxiety  - Id, Ego, & Superego continually  in conflict  Repression: Keeping unacceptable impulses  or wishes from conscious awareness  - Denial: Not accepting a painful  reality  into conscious awareness  - Projection:  Attributing  to someone else one's own unacceptable  thoughts or feelings - Displacement:  Redirecting  emotional  responses from their  real target to someone else  - Reaction formation:  Converting an unacceptable feeling into its opposite  - Regression: Retreating  to the behavioral  patterns of an earlier  stage of development   - Rationalize:  Offering acceptable  reasons for an unacceptable action or attitude  - Sublimation:  Converting unacceptable aggressive  or sexual impulses  into socially valued behaviors  - Selected defense mechanisms  Defense Mechanisms  Understand early-childhood  experiences,  particularly  key (parental)  relationships  - Understand patterns in current relationships  - Goals of psychoanalytic therapy or psychoanalysis  The patient tries  to say whatever comes to mind without censoring  anything  Free Association  - Transference is a phenomenon characterized  by unconscious redirection  of feelings  from one person to another 
(patient  to therapist) 
The patient responds to the analyst  in ways that the patient  has previously  responded to other important  figures  in his 
or her life, and the analyst helps the patient  understand and interpret  these responses 
Analysis of transference  - The Liberation from  the conflict  (effects  of the unconscious material)  is achieved through bringing this material  into 
the conscious mind 
The analysts points out to the patient  the meaning of certain  of the patient's  behaviors  Interpretation  - Psychoanalytic  Techniques  Psychoanalytic  Therapy  Analytical  psychology  - Archetypes  According to Jungian Psychoanalysis,  the Great Mother archetype symbolizes  creativity,  birth,  fertility,  sexual 
union and nurturing.  She is a creative force not only for life, but also for art and ideas 
The mother figure  Collective  unconscious  - Jung (1875-1961) Childhood experiences help shape adult personality  - There are unconscious influences  on behavior  - Continuing influences  of Freud and his followers  Neo-Freudians  Focus on observable behavior  Emphasis on learning  rather than thinking  or innate tendencies  Behaviorism  - Classical  conditioning  Operant conditioning  Modeling  Three types of learning  - John Watson (1878-1958) In behaviorist  terms,  the dog's salivation  is known as an unconditioned  response ( a stimulus- response connection that 
required no learning) 
- Unconditioned stimulus  (Food) > Unconditioned response (salivation)  In behaviorist  terms  it is written  as:  - Pavlov showed the existence of the unconditioned  response by presenting a dog with a bowl of food and then measuring  its 
salivary  secretions 
- Pavlovian conditioning  (Pavlov's dogs)  Meat powder (automatically  elicits  salivation)  Unconditioned stimulus  (USC) - Salivation  (automatic  response to meat powder)  Unconditioned response (UR) - Initial  ringing of bell (does not automatically  elicit  salivation)  Neutral stimulus  (NS) - After pairing the NS and the UCS, the NS becomes a CS (bell  now automatically  elicits  salivation)  Conditioned stimulus  (CS) - Salivation  (automatic  response to bell)  Condition response (CR)  - CS (bell) not followed by USC (meat powder) causes gradual disappearance  of CR (salivation)  Extinction  - Discovered by Pavlov (1849-1936)  Principle  of reinforcement  Behaviors followed by pleasant stimuli  are strengthened  Positive  reinforcement  Behaviors that terminate  negative stimulus  are strengthened  Negative reinforcement  B.F Skinner (1904-1990)  - Operant Conditioning;  behavior that operates  on the environment  Can occur without reinforcement  Learning by watching and imitating  others behaviors  - Modeling reduced children's fear of dogs  Bandura & Menlove (1968)  - Modeling  Used to treat  phobias  Combines deep muscle relaxation  and gradual exposure to the feared condition  or object  Usually starts with minimal  anxiety producing condition  and gradually progresses  to more feared Systematic  desensitization  (imagine  what you fear while in deep relaxation) - Rewarding a behavior only occasionally  more effective  than continuous schedules of reinforcement  Intermittent  reinforcement  - Behavior Therapy or Behavior modification  The evolution of contemporary thought  How we think or appraise a situation  influences  our feelings and behaviors  - Limitations  of behavior therapy  Emphasizes how people think about themselves  and their  experiences can be a major  determinant  of psychopathology  - Focus on understanding  maladaptive  thoughts  - Change cognitions to change feelings  and behaviors  - Cognitive therapy  Importance  of cognitions  Chapter 2 A paradigm is a set of basic assumptions  that influence how you think about data  - Paradigms in psychopathology  Aim for objectivity  Goal: Study abnormal behavior scientifically.  - We can never really be objective;  subjective  factors  interfere Perspective  or conceptual framework  from within which a scientist  operates  Paradigm (Thomas Kuhn)  - Notion of a paradigm  Current Paradigms of psychopathology  Behavioral genetics  - Molecular  genetics  - Gene-environment  interactions  - Genetic paradigm  The Genetic paradigm  Carriers of genetic information  - Ex: relationships,  culture  Impacted by environment  influences  - Relationship  between genes and environment  is bidirectional  - Genes  Proteins influence  whether the action of a specific gene will occur  - Gene expression  Multiple  gene pairs vs. single gene  - A number of gene pairs combine their influences  to create a single (phenotypic)  trait  - Polygenic transmission  Extent to which variability  In behavior is due to genetic factors  - It estimates  range from 0.0 to 1.0, the higher the number, the greater the heritability  - Heritability  Heredity plays a role in most behavior  Ex: siblings  who are raised in the same environment,  by the same parents,  go to the same school, etc…  Events and experiences that family  members  have in common  - Shared environment  Ex: one sibling  might have been in a car accident but not the other Events and experiences that are unique to each family  member  - Nonshared environment  Environmental  effects  Study of the degree to which genes and environmental  factors  influence behavior  Genetic material  by an individual  - They are unobservable  - Consists of inherited genes  Genotype: The total  genetic makeup of a person  - Genotypes (unobservable)  Observable expression of the genes  Expressed genetic material  - Ex: Green eyes  Observable behavior or characteristics  - Depends on interaction  of genotype and environment  - Phenotype (observable)  Behavior genetics  The field of biology and genetics  that studies the structure  and function of genes at a molecular  level  *Remember APOE, allele 4 associated  with AD Different  in DNA sequence on a gene occurring in a population Alleles  - Difference in DNA sequence on a gene occurring  in a population  Polymorphism  - Refers to differences  between people In a single nucleotide  in the DNA sequence of a particular  gene.  One area of interest  in the study of gene sequence involves identifying  what are called single nucleotide  polymorphisms  or 
SNPs 
- A CNV can be present in a single gene or multiple  genes. The name refers  to an abnormal  copy of one or more 
sections  of DNA within the gene(s).
Another area of interest  is the study of differences  between people in gene culture,  including the identification  of what are
called copy number variations  (CNVs) 
- Identifies  particular  genes and their  functions  Molecular  genetics  An example would be if a person has gene XYZ, he or she might respond to a snake bite by developing a fear of snakes. 
Another person without gene XYZ would not have developed a fear of snakes after  being bitten. 
- Another example  would  be depression  - One's response to a specific  environmental  event is influenced by genes Researchers had found that those with either the short-short  allele  or the short-long  allele combinations  of the 5-HTT 
gene  
This shows how it was a combination  of the genes and the environment.  I. and  were maltreated  as children were most  likely to have major depressive disorder  as adults than either those people 
who had the gene combination  but where not maltreated  as children  or those who had the long-long allele  but where 
also maltreated  as children. 
This gene has a polymorphism  such that some people have two short alleles  (short-short),  some have two long alleles (long-
long) and some have one short one long (long-short). 
- Serotonin transporter  gene (5-HTT)  The study of the phenotypic trait  variations  caused by environmental  factors  that switch genes on and off - Epigenetics  Ex: A genetic risk for alcohol use disorder may predispose persons to life events that put them in high risk situations 
for alcohol use such as being in trouble with the law. 
The basic idea is that genes may predispose us to seek out certain  environments  that then increase  our risk to developing a 
particular  disorder. 
- Reciprocal gene-environment  interactions  Gene-Environment  Interaction Examines the contribution  of brain structure  and function to psychopathology  - The neuroscience paradigm  holds that mental  disorders  are linked to aberrant processes in the brain.  Neurons and neurotransmitters  I. Brain structure and function  II. Neuroendocrine system III. Three major  components are:  Cell body  I. Dendrites  II. Axons  III. Terminal  buttons  IV. Four major parts  include:  Neurons: cells of the nervous system  - Nerve impulse:  Occurs when a neuron is appropriately  stimulated  at its cell body or through its dendrites.  It travels down 
the axon to the terminal  endings. 
- Synapse: Between the terminal  endings of the sending axon and the cell membrane of the receiving  neuron.  - Neurons   Chemicals that allow neurons to send a signal across the synapse to another neuron  - Excitatory:  Leading to the creation  of a nerve impulse  in the postsynaptic  neuron  I. Inhibitory:  Making the postsynaptic  cell less likely to create a nerve impulse.  II. Receptor sites on postsynaptic  neuron absorb neurotransmitter  which can either  be:  - Reuptake: Reabsorption of leftover  neurotransmitter  by presynaptic  neuron  - Implicated  In depression, mania, and schizophrenia  Serotonin and dopamine  Implicated  in anxiety and other stress-related  disorders  Norepinephrine  Inhibits  nerve impulses  Implicated  in anxiety  Gamma-aminobutyric  acid (GABA)  Several key neurotransmitters  are:  - Excessive or inadequate levels  Insufficient  reuptake  Excessive number or hypersensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  Possible mechanisms:  - Once they are released, they play a role in adjusting the sensitivity  of postsynaptic  receptors  to dopamine, 
norepinephrine,  or serotonin. 
When a cell has been firing more frequently,  this receptor  releases second messengers.  - Ex: A serotonin agonist is a drug that  stimulates  serotonin receptors  to produce the same effects  as serotonin  does 
naturally. 
Agonist: A drug that stimulates  a particular  neurotransmitter's  receptors.  - Ex: Many drugs used to treat schizophrenia  are dopamine antagonists  that work by blocking dopamine receptors.  Antagonist:  A drug that works on a neurotransmitter's  receptors to dampen the activity  of that neurotransmitter  - Neurotransmitter  HPA axis involved in stress  - Hypothalamus triggers  release of corticotrophin-releasing  hormone (CRF)  - Pituitary  gland releases adrenocorticotropic  hormone (ACTH) - Adrenal cortex triggers  release  of cortisol,  the stress hormone  - The HPA axis of the neuroendocrine  system  Antidepressants  Antipsychotics  Benzodiazepines  Psychoactive drugs alter neurotransmitter  activity  - A neuroscience view does not preclude psychological  interventions  - Neuroscience approaches to treatment  Reductionism:  View that behavior can best be understood by reducing it to its  basic biological  components  - Evaluating the neuroscience paradigm  Current paradigms:  Neuroscience  Roots in learning principles  and cognitive  science  Getting attention  - Escape or avoidance  - Sensory stimulation  - Access to desirable objects  or events  - Behavior is reinforced  by consequences such as:  Strengthens responses  - Ex: Giving a dog a treat after she sits.  Presents something  pleasant after  a behavior is emitted  - Positive  reinforcement  All behavior is determined  by our reinforcement  history  - B.F Skinner  Ex: Time- out, when a child behaves incorrectly  and as a consequence is sent for a period of time to a location  with no 
positive  reinforcement. 
- In order to alter  behavior, one must modify consequences  Relaxation plus imagined exposure  - Important  treatment  for anxiety disorders  - Driving to clinic  1. Entering treatment  room  2. Seeing clinic nurse  3. Train patient to associate alternative  response (ex: deep muscle relaxation)  with these events.  § Construct hierarchy  of events related to original  stimulus  which elicits  the maladaptive  response for each patient  - Systematic  desensitization  A treatment  to systematically  increase exposure to positive activities,  and thereby improve affect  and corresponding 
cognitions. 
- Behavioral activation  (for depression) Behaviorism  criticized  for ignoring thoughts and emotions  - Cognitive science focuses on how people (and animals)  structure  their experiences,  how they make sense of them, and how 
they relate their current  experiences to past ones that have been stored in memory. 
- Perceiving, recognizing,  conceiving, judging, and reasoning  § A mental process that includes:  - Organized network of previously  accumulated  knowledge  § We actively  interpret  new information  § Schema (cognitive schema)  - Anxious individuals  more likely to attend to threat or danger § Role of attention in psychopathology  - Cognitive science  What is important  is the cognitive process, not the behavior  - Learners are not passive responders to the environmental  stimuli  - Learners are actively  making mental  connections between new information  and old information.  - Learners organize their knowledge into categories  and connected networks.  - Cognitive paradigm  Attends to thoughts, perceptions,  judgments,  self-statements,  and unconscious assumptions  - Incorporates  theory and research on cognitive  processes.  - Change a pattern of thinking  § Changes in thinking  can change feelings,  behaviors, and symptoms  § Cognitive reconstructing  - Cognitive behavior therapy  Initially  developed for depression  - Beck developed a cognitive therapy for depression based on the idea that depressed mood is caused by distortions  In the 
way people perceive life  events 
- Attention, interpretation,  and recall of negative and positive  information  biased in depression  § Information-processing  bias  - Help patients  recognize and change their  negative thought patterns - Beck's cognitive therapy  Focus is on current determinants  of disorder  and less on historical,  childhood antecedents.  - Answer is still  unclear  § Are distorted  thoughts the cause or the result  of psychopathology?  - Evaluating the CBT paradigm  Cognitive paradigms:  Cognitive behavioral  Influence how we respond to problems and challenges  in our environment  - Help us organize our thoughts and actions, both explicitly  and implicitly  - Guide our behavior  - Expressive  § Experiential  § Physiological  § Components:  - Emotions Disturbances in emotion is key to several  disorders  Ex: Flat affect in schizophrenia  (a severe reduction  in emotional  expressiveness)  § Most psychopathology includes disturbances  of one or more component  - Americans value happiness more as someone from another culture,  for example East Asian cultures,  like China, 
value calmness more than happiness 
Western vs. Eastern philosophy  § Ideal effect:  Refers to the kinds of emotional  states that a person ideally wants to feel  - Emotional  dysregulation  Gender, race, culture, ethnicity,  and socioeconomics  status  § Ex: Women more likely to experience  depression than men.  May increase  vulnerability  to psychopathology  § Sociocultural  factors  - Factors that cut across the paradigms  Object relations  theory: Stresses the importance  for long-standing  patterns in close relationships,  particularly  within 
the family. 
§ Attachment  theory: The type of style of an infant's  attachment  to his or her caregiver can set the stage for 
psychological  health or problems  later in life 
§ Stresses  the importance  of interpersonal  relationships  - Interpersonal  psychotherapy  (IPT) focuses upon improving  problematic  interpersonal  relationships - Unsolved grief:  Grief which is either  delayed and experienced long after the loss  I. Role disputes:  The patient and significant  people in his life have different  expectations about their relationships  II. Role transitions:  Depression may occur during life transitions  when a person's role changes and he doesn’t know how 
to cope with the change 
III. Interpersonal  deficits:  This may be an area of focus if the patient  has had problems  with forming  and maintaining   
good quality relationships. 
IV. Four basic problems  recognized by IPT  - Interpersonal   theory  Genetic, neurobiological,  psychological,  and environmental  § Integrative  model that incorporates  multiple  causal factors  - May be biological  or psychological  (gene or cognitive  style)  Underlying predisposition  § Increase one's risk of developing disorder  § Diathesis  - May occur at any point after  conception  Triggering event  Environmental  events  § Death of spouse  Divorce  Marital  separation  Jail term  Death of family  member  Personal injury or illness  Marriage  Fired at wok  Most common stressors  include  § Stress  - Diathesis-Stress  Current paradigms:  The factors that cut across paradigms  (trans-diagnostic)  Chapter 3 The classification  of disorders by symptoms  and signs - Diagnosis  Facilitates  communication  among professionals  about cases and research  - Advances the search for causes and treatments  - Cornerstone of clinical  care  - Helps in specifying appropriate  treatment - Advantages of diagnosis include the following  Inter-rater:  Refers to the degree to which two independent observers  agree on what they have observed.  Test-retest:  Similarity  of scores across repeated test  administrations  or observations Alternate form  reliability:  Similarity  of scored on tests  that are similar  but not identical  Internal  consistency:  Asses whether the items  on a test are related to one another Consistency of measurement  is assessed  by these different  types of reliabilities:  § Reliability:  Consists of measurement  - Just because something  is reliable  does not mean it is always valid  § Ex: The item on the test represent  the entire  range of possible items  the test  should cover  Content validity:  Extent to which a measure  adequately samples  the domain of interest  § If both variable  are measured at the same point in time, the resulting  validity  is referred  to as concurrent validity.  Alternatively,  criterion  validity  can be assessed by evaluating  the ability  of the measure to predict some other 
variable that is measured at some point in the future, often referred to as predictive  validity. 
Criterion  validity:  Evaluated by determining  whether a measure is associated  in an expected way with some other 
measures (the criterion) 
§ Involves correlating  multiple  indirect  measures of the attributes.  a) Construct:  An abstract  concept or inferred  attribute,  such as anxiousness or distorted  cognition.  I. Construct validity:  The degree to which a test measures what it claims,  or purports, to be measuring § In medicine  and statistics,  gold standard  usually refers to a diagnostic  test or benchmark that is the best available 
under reasonable  conditions. 
Other times  it is used to refer to the most accurate test possible  Gold standard  § Extent to which clinicians  agree on the diagnoses  Interrater  reliability  § Validity:  Related to whether a measure measures  what it is supposed to measure.  - The concepts of reliability  and validity  are the cornerstones  of any diagnostic or assessment  procedure.  First published in 1952  § Diagnostic and statistical  manual of mental  disorders (DSM) published by American psychiatric  association - Axis I: Clinical  Disorders  § Axis II: Developmental  disorders  and personality  disorders  § Axis III:  General medical  disorders  § Axis IV: Psychosocial and Environmental  problems  § Axis V: Global assessment  of functioning  scale (GAF scale)  § Multiaxial  classification  system DSM-IV-TR and likely  DSM-5  - In DSM-5 they are likely  to be reduced to one axis for clinical  syndrome and one for psychosocial  and environmental 
problems. 
- Classification  and Diagnosis  Either you are anxious or you are not anxious  Presence/absence  of a disorder  § Categorical  (DSM)  - Describes the degree of an entity that is present  How anxious are you from a scale  of 1 to 10?  Rank on a continuous quantitative  dimension  § Dimensional  (not DSM)  - Categorical  vs. Dimensional  systems of diagnosis  Mental illness  is universal  - The persons availability  of treatment  § Willingness  for one to seek help  § Types of symptoms  experienced  § Risk factors  § Culture can influence:  - The DSM includes 25 culture bound syndromes  in the appendix. Culture bound syndromes  are diagnoses that are likely to 
be seen within specific  regions.
- Ethical and Cultural  considerations  Ex: Depression after the death of a loved one  Should relatively  common reactions  be pathologized? (treated  as psychologically  abnormal or unhealthy)  § Too many diagnoses?  - Refers to the presence of a second diagnoses  § Some argue that this overlap Is a sign that we are dividing syndromes too finely.  45% of people diagnosed with one disorder will meet criteria  for a second disorder  § Comorbidity  - Criticism  of the DSM  Construct validity  is of highest concern - For most disorders,  there is no lab test available  to diagnose with certainty    § Diagnoses are constructs:  - Possible etiological  causes (past)  § Clinical  characteristics  (current)  § Predict treatment  response (future)  § Strong constructs validity  predicts  wide range of characteristics  - Construct validity  of diagnostic  categories  Treated differently  by others  § Difficulty  finding a job  § Stigma against  mental illness  - The disorder does not define the person  § She is an individual  with schizophrenia,  not a "schizophrenic"  § Categories do not capture the uniqueness  of a person  - Relevant information  may be overlooked  § Classification  may emphasize  trivial  similarities  - Criticisms  of classification  Described client's problem  § Determined causes of the problem  § Arrived at diagnoses  § Develop a treatment  strategy  § Monitor treatment  progress  § Conducting valid research  § Techniques employed to"  - Interviews  § Personality  inventories  § Intelligence  tests  § Ideal assessment  involves multiple  measures and methods  - Psychological  assessment  In these interviews,  the interviewer  pays close attention  to how the patient  answers the questions, how they don’t.  - They check to see if the response is accompanied by appropriate  emotion  - Informal  / less structured  interviews  - Empathy and accepting attitude  is very important  - Reliability  lower than for a structured  interview  - Clinical  interviews  All interviewers  ask the same questions  in a predetermined  order  - Very structured  - Good interrater  reliability  for most diagnostic  categories § Most symptoms  are rated on a three-point  scale  § Structured  clinical  interview for Axis I of DMS (SCID)  - Structured  interview  Yields profile of psychological functioning  Specific subscales  to detect lying and faking  Personality  tests  § Asses current  mental ability  Wechsler adult intelligence  scale (WAIS) ® Wechsler intelligence  scale for children (WISC)  ® Wechsler preschool  and primary scale for children, 3rd ed. (WPPSI-III)  ® Wechsler scales  Information  (general  knowledge)  Comprehension:  asks questions  designed to measure practical  knowledge and understanding of social rules and 
concepts 
Arithmetic:  requires solving series  of arithmetic  problems.  The examinee  must solve problems mentally,  without 
the use of pencil or paper, and respond orally within a time  limit. 
Used to predict  performance, diagnose learning  disabilities  or intellectual  developmental  disorder (mental 
retardation),  identify gifted  children. 
® Standord-Binet  Intelligence  tests  § The two most common psychological  tests are  - Asses personality  traits  and psychopathology  Primarily  intended to test people who are suspected of having mental  health or other clinical  issues  `Scale 1 - Hypochondriasis:  This scale  was designed to asses a neurotic concern over bodily functioning. 
Items  on this  scale include somatic  symptoms and physical  well being. 
® Scale 2 - Depression: This scale was originally  designed to identify  depression, characterized  by poor 
morale, lack of hope in future, and a general dissatisfaction  with one's own life situation 
® Scale 3 -  Hysteria:  The third  scale was originally  designed to identify  those who display hysteria  in 
stressful  situations.   
® Scale 4 - Psychopathic disorder:  Originally  developed to identify  psychopathic patients:  Originally 
developed to identify  psychopathic patients,  this scale measures  social deviation,  lack of acceptance of 
authority,  and morality.  Can be thought of as a scale of disobedience 
® Scale 5 - Masculinity/Femininity:  This scale was designed by the original  author's to identify  homosexual 
tendencies, but was found to be largely ineffective. 
® Scale 6 - Paranoia: This scale was originally  developed to Identify  patients  with paranoid symptoms  such 
as suspiciousness,  feelings  of persecution,  grandiose self-concepts,  excessive sensitivity,  and rigid 
attitudes. 
® Scale 7 - Psychasthenia:  This diagnostic  is no longer used today and the symptoms  described on this  scale 
are more reflective  of obsessive-compulsive  disorder. Was originally  used to measure  excessive doubts, 
compulsions,  obsessions etc.. 
® Scale 8 - Schizophrenia:  This scale was originally  developed to identify schizophrenic  patients  and reflects 
a wide variety  of areas including bizarre  thought processes and peculiar perceptions,  social  alienation,  poor 
familial  relationships,  difficulties  in concentration  and impulse  control, lack of deep interests,  disturbing 
questions of self-worth and self-identity,  and sexual difficulties.
® Scale 9 - Hypomania: This scale was developed to identify characteristics  of hypomania such as elevated 
mood, accelerated  speech and motor activity,  irritability,  flight  of ideas, and brief periods of depression 
® Scale 0 - Social introversion:  This scale was developed later than the other nine scales, its designed to 
assess a person's tendency to withdraw from social contacts 
® MMPI Scales  ? Scale - Cannot say (MMPI/MMPI-2).  A tally of omitted  items. High scores may be due to 
obsessiveness,  defensiveness,  difficulty  in reading, confusion, hostility,  or paranoia. Twenty or more 
unanswered should be considered significant 
I. Lie scales?  ® K Scale - Defensiveness.  K is a subtle and valuable correction  for defensiveness.  I. Assumes psychopathology. Is someone with a history  of psychopathology problems  scores high, then 
they are being defensive 
II. K scale  ® F scale - Infrequency. Very high possible random, exaggerated,  or mis-scored  profile.  I. Very high scores commonly  found with psychotic patients.  II. High scores best measure of overall  psychopathology, resentment,  acting out, and moodiness.  III. F scale  ® Validity scales  of MMPI  Most common test is the Minnesota  multiphasic  personality  test  § Personality  inventory:  The person is asked to complete a self-report  questionnaire  indicating  whether statements  assessing 
habitual tendencies  apply to him or her. 
- Psychological  test  The subjects perceptions  of inkblots  are recorded and then analyzed using psychological  interpretation    Rorschach inkblot  test  § It is known as the picture interpretation  technique  because it uses a series of provocative yet ambiguous pictures 
and the subject is asked to tell  a story
They are asked to tell  as dramatic  a story as they can for each picture.  What has led up to the event shown I. What is happening at the moment  II. What the characters  are feeling  and thinking  III. What the outcome of the story was  IV. Most of the common things asked are  Thematic apperception  test (TAT)  § Projective  tests  - Responses to ambiguous stimuli  reflect  unconscious processes § Projective  hypothesis  - Psychological  tests  Focus on aspects of environment  § Characteristic  of the person  § Frequency and form of problematic  behaviors  § Consequences of problem behaviors  § Behavioral assessments  are often conducted in lab setting  - Observe behavior as it occurs  - Antecedents and consequences  § Sequence of behavior divided into segments  - Ex: moods, stressful  evets, thoughts, etc…  Self-monitoring:  individuals  observe and record their  own behavior  § Involves the collection  of data in real time  as opposed to the more usual methods of having people reflect back 
over some time  period and report  on recently experienced  thoughts, moods, or stressors. 
Ecological momentary  assessment  (EMA)  § Self observation - Used to help plan treatment  targets  § Format often similar  to personality  test  § Identifies  negative  thought patterns  Dysfunctional  attitude  scale (DAS)  § Cognitive-style  questionnaires  - Behavioral & cognitive assessment  Helps to asses structural  brain abnormalities  A moving beam of x-rays passes a horizontal  cross section of the person's brain, scanning it through 360 
degrees; the moving x-ray detector  on the other side measures  the amount of radioactivity  that penetrates, 
detecting  subtle differences  in tissue  density. 
Computerized  axial tomography (CAT scan or CT) § Superior to the CAT scan because it gives a picture of much higher quality  and does not use even the smallest 
amount of radiation  that the CAT scan uses . 
The person is placed inside a large, circular  magnet, which causes the hydrogen atoms In the body to move. 
When the magnetic force is turned off, the atoms return to their original  positions,  which produces an 
electromagnetic  signal 
Magnetic resonance imaging  (MRI)  § Brain imaging  - Postmortem  studies  (Alzheimer's)  - Metabolite  levels:  Byproduct so neurotransmitter  breakdown found in urine, blood serum, or cerebral  fluid.  § May not reflect  the actual level of neurotransmitter  § Metabolite  assays  - Studies how brain abnormalities  affect  thinking, feeling,  and behavior  § Neuropsychologist  - Reveal performance  deficits  that can indicate areas of brain malfunction  § Tactile performance  test-time  Tactile performance  test-memory  Speech sounds perception test  Halstead-Reitan  battery  § Assesses motor skills,  tactile  and kinesthetic  skills,  verbal and spatial  skills,  expressive and receptive  speech  Luria-Nebraska battery  § Measures developed for one culture or ethnic group may not be valid or reliable  for another  Can lead to exaggerating or minimizing  psychological problems  Increase graduate student sensitivity  to cultural  issues  ® Strategies  to avoid the bias:  Cultural bias in assessment  § Make allowances for variations  in the use of personal space  Respectful of cultural  variations  of touch (hugging, kiss introductions,  etc…)  Adjust the communication  style  Expand roles and practices  as needed  Cultural responsiveness  § Neuropsychological  tests  - Neurobiological  Assessment Diagnosis & assessment  Chapter 4  The systematic  pursuit  of knowledge through observation    § Scientist  gather data to test theories  § Science: comes from the latin scire, "to know" - Means that a hypothesis is testable  by empirical  experiments,  and conforms  to the standard of scientific  method  A good theory is falsifiable § Theory: a set of propositions  meant to explain a class of observations  - Hypothesis: specific  predictions  about what will occur if a theory is correct  - Science and scientific  methods  Great source of hypothesis  § Can provide information  about novel cases or procedures  § Can disconfirm  a relationship  that was believed to be universal  § Cannot provide causal evidence because cannot rule out alternative  hypothesis  § Case study: collection  of detailed biographical  information  - May be biased by observer's theoretical  views  § Widely used because we cannot manipulate  many risk variables  or diagnosis  in psychopathology research  in humans  § Cannot determine  causality  because of the directionality  and third variable  problems  § Correlation:  Study of the relationship  between two or more variables;  measured as they exist in nature  - Best method for determining  causal relationships  § Experiment:  includes a manipulated  independent variable, a dependent variable,  preferably at least one control  group, and 
random assignment  group. 
- Detailed biographical  description  of an individual  § Rich description,  especially  helpful  for rare disorders  Generate hypothesis  Disprove hypothesis  Usefulness § Paradigm may influence observations  Cannot rule out alternative  explanations  Cannot prove hypothesis  Limitations  § Case study  - Ex: Do people who have more stress  have more headaches?  Studies questions of the form "Do variable X and variable Y vary together?" § Variables are measured but not manipulated  § Cannot determine  cause or effect  § The correlation  method  - Varies from -1.0 to +1.0 § Strength:  the high the absolute value, the stronger the relationship § Positive:  Higher scores on variable  X associated  with high score of variable  Y  Negative: Higher scores on variable  X associated with lower scores on variable  Y  Direction  § Large samples  increase likelihood  of significance  ® Can be influenced by number of participants  Statistical  significance § Is the association  meaningful  as well as statistically  significant?  Whether a relationship  between variables  is large enough to matter  Clinical  significance  § Correlation  does not imply causality  We do not know which variable  may cause the other  ® Variable X may cause variable Y  ® Variable Y may cause variable X  ® There may even be a third variable  not taken into account  ® Directionality  problem  Problems of causality  § Cross - sectional:  Causes and effects  are measured at the same point in time.  Follow large population  over time  ® High risk method: With this approach, only people who have the highest risk of developing a disorder  are 
included 
® Longitudinal:  examines whether causes are present  before disorder  develops  Longitudinal  vs. Cross-sectional  design  § Measuring correlation  - Study of the distribution  of disorders  in a population and possible  correlations  § Prevalence:  The proportion  of people with the disorder either  currently  or during their lifetime  § Incidence:  The proportion  of people who develop new cases of the disorder in a period of time, usually a year  § Increased risk of disease or infection  Ex: Obesity is a risk factor for high blood pressure  Risk factors:  Variables  that are related  to the likelihood  of developing the disorder  § Epidemiological  research  - Methods in psychopathology  Family method  § Twin method  § Adoptees method  § 50% shared genes  First degree relatives  (parents,  children, siblings)  § 25% shared genes  Second degree relatives  (aunts, uncles, grandparents)  § Sample of individuals  who psychopathology  Index cases/probands  § Family studies  - 100% shared genes  Monozygotic (MZ)/ Identical  twins  § 50% shared genes  Dizygotic (DZ)/ Fraternal  twins  § Similarity  of diagnosis  Concordance  § Twin studies  - In identical  twins, if one has schizophrenia,  the other has a 50% chance of getting it as well  § In fraternal  twins, it drops to 15%  § Schizophrenia twin method  - Methods to determine  genetic predisposition  (concordance)  to psychopathology  Adoption studies:  Study adoptees who have biological  parents  with psychopathology  - Cross-fostering:  Study of adoptees who have adoptive parents with psychopathology  - Behavioral genetics  Association studies:  Examine the relationship  between a specific  allele and a trait  or behavior in the population  - Molecular  genetics  Provides information  on causal relationships  - Hypothesis  - Null hypothesis:  No difference  between groups  - Random assignment  § Independent variable (manipulated)  § Dependent variable  (measured),  expected to vary with conditions  of the independent  variable.  § Involves:  - Can evaluate treatment  effectiveness  - Experimental  effect:  Differences between conditions  on the dependent variable  - Internal  validity:  Extent to which experimental  effect is due to independent variable  - Would results apply to others besides  the study participants?  § External validity:  Extent to which results  generalize beyond the study  - Treatment  manuals  § Placebo  Control group  § Double blind procedure  § Empirically  supported  treatments  - Exclusion of diverse populations  § Sample composition  - Efficacy:  Whether a treatment  works under the purest of conditions  § Effectiveness:  How well the treatment  works in the real world  § Efficacy and effectiveness  - Experiments  are not always possible  in psychopathology due to ethical  or practical  constraints  § Induce temporary  symptoms  College students who tend to be anxious or depressed  ® Recruit participants  with similarities  to diagnosable disorders  Animal research  Create or observe a related phenomenon - analogue - in the lab to allow more intensive  study  § Analogue experiment  - The experiment  Research methods in the study of psychopathology Abnormal Psychology Friday, February 3, 2017 5:07 PM
background image Exam 1 Study Guide  Introduction  & Historical  preview  Chapter 1  The study of mental disorders  It studies the nature, development, & treatment  of psychological disorders  Avoid preconceived notions  - Maintain  objectivity  - Reduce stigma  - Challenges to this  study include  Psychopathology  Emotional  pain & suffering  - Personal distress  Ex: Poor work performance  or serious  fight with ones spouse § Impairment  in some important  area of life  - Disability  Makes others uncomfortable  or causes problems  - Violation of social norms  The disorder occurs within the individual  - It involves clinically  proven significant  difficulties  in thinking,  feeling, or behaving  - It involves dysfunction in processes that support mental  functioning  - It is not a culturally  specific  reaction  to an event  - It is not mainly a result  of a problem  with society or social deviance  - When thinking of defining a mental  disorder one must also take these things into consideration:  Defining mental disorder  Distinguishing  label is applied  I. Label refers  to undesirable  attributes  II. People with the label  are seen as different  III.